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February 15, 2001 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February

2001-

- --.

* RESEARCH
Researcher touts
workload managers
wto aid busy drivers
Instead of setting safety standards
for the use of electronics in cars,
Transportation Research Institute
senior research scientist Paul Green
suggests using a computer to deter-
mine the demands and capabilities on
a driver at a given time called "work-
load managers," which would then be
sent to the driver.
Distractions, including radios, cell
phones and navigational devices, cause
numerous accidents, according to evi-
dence from Japan that Green studied.
Following a ban on the use of cell
phones while driving in 1999, the
number of cell phone-related crashes
dropped 75 percent in Japan.
Another study also showed that cell
phones make the risk for a crash four
times greater than without a phone.
Soot a top cause
of global warming
Soot is one of the leading causes of
the rise in temperatures around the
world, according to Mark Jacobson, a
civil and environmental engineering
professor at Stanford University.
The study, which appeared in the
journal "Nature,' shows that the num-
ber two cause of global warming
could be soot, behind carbon dioxide,
the greenhouse gas.
According to Jacobson's article,
reduction in the emission of soot, pro-
Wduced during the use of fossil fuels
and burning of wood, could lessen the
effects of global warming.
Jacobson's findings closely follow a
report by the United Nations Intergov-
rernmental Panel on Climate Control,
which predicted that the average tem-
perature on the Earth's surface will
~ increase by 10.4 degrees by the end of
this century. This increase would melt
W glaciers, flood shorelines and cause
massive drought periods.
According to the IPCC, byproducts
of fossil fuel burning are to blame for
global warning not soot.
In Jacobsons' studies, he shows that
mixtures containing black carbon,
such as soot, release two times the
heat as pure black carbon molecules,
which could significantly effect global
-warming.
Researchers have proposed comput-
er models for further exploration.
":Scientists develop
-' powersave device
Researchers at the University of
Florida are currently looking at a new
device to combat power crises such as
the recent blackouts in California.
According to an article published
in "Applied Physics Letters," the
team of engineering researchers are
- building a rectifier, an electronic
switch composed of galium nitride,
which can withstand 10kV of ener-
gy. The minimum for the switch to
be used in residential power lines is
13.8kV.
The current power lines use
mechanical switches, causing prob-
f lems, including the transmission of
electrical spikes, which can cause
electronics to shut down.
To avoid this shutdown, cities oper-
ate at a lower capacity, and power
lines carry less electricity, which can
cause blackouts in areas where the

power supply is small.
Advantages to the new switches
include providing more electricity to
people in power-starve~d areas, short-
ening outages and assuring people of
~uninterrupted electricity.
fPhilosophy profs.
Sstart online journal
In the hope of extending journal
accessibility, philosophy Projfs.
Stephen Darwall and J. David
Velleman will act as editors of a
. free online journal, titled "Philoso-
phers' Imprint," which will be pub-
lished by the University of
Michigan's Digital Library.
The site, created due to a signifi-
cant rise in journal subscription
costs, features a prototype article,
titled "The Dear Self" by Princeton
University philosophy Prof. Harry
.. Frankfurt.
The journal plans on publishing
journals at irregular intervals and to
apply high standards to submissions
before they are published.
- Comnpiled by Daily Staff Reporter
Lisa Hof inan.

Going out

Prof. withdraws
candidacy for job
after bomb scare,

3A

KALAMAZOO (AP) - An Israeli
professor has withdrawn his candidacy
for a job at Western Michigan Universi-
ty after he was accused of telling an air-
port official that a bomb was in his
luggage.
The 56-year-old professor of
medieval history flew from Haifa,
Israel, on Sunday to Kalamazoo. He
was to interview Monday for the posi-
tion of history department chairman.
When he arrived at Kalamazoo-Battle
Creek International Airport, an official
there told him one of his bags was left
behind at Chicago O'Hare International
Airport.
The professor later said he was tired,
irate and only joking when he allegedly
responded that a bomb was inside the
bag. But he was detained for question-
ing and local and federal officials
opened investigations.
His comment led to the activation
Sunday of O'Hare's bomb squad and the

closure of an entire section of the air-
port. Bomb experts and bomb-s mi'fing
dogs located the professor's luggagc.
and no bomb was inside.
The professor was released.t jjie
custody of a Western Michigan o1Iicial.
The FBI has not charged the pro1 s-
sor with any crime while it continuesto
look into the matter.
Sgt. Ron Lee of the Kalamazoo
Department of Public Safety has said
his agency will ask the U.S. attorney's
office to charge the man regardlessdof
what the FBI decides. Making a-boimb
threat at an airport is a federal -rinse
punishable by up to four years in pison
and a fine of S2,000, Lee said.
A telephone message seeking com-
ment was left yesterday at the U.. ar-
ney's office in Grand Rapids.
Western Michigan officials said tiny
had accepted the professor's req ucst to
withdraw his candidacy for the job. rhe
Kalamazoo Gazette reported yesterd i.

r
E
I

SAM HOLLENSHEAD Daily
LSA freshman Sara Stock walks past a Cenetaur on one of the columns of Angell Hall yesterday afternoon.

Photograf
Bob Kaim
dies of di~a

I

r-

By Jacquelyn Nixon
Daily StaffReporter

After half a century of capturing the
glamour of' the University's history,
photographer Bob Kalmbach died ear-
lier this week after many years of suf-
fering from diabetes.
Kalmbach began his tenure at the
University as a
photographer dur-
ing the 1950s and t
was later hired by X X
News and Infor-
mation Services
in 1972.
His portfolio
includes photos of
Arthur M iller,
Walter Cronkite Kalmbach
and former presi-K
dents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.
Kalmbach has also published photos
in Sports Illustrated and National
Geographic.
University spokeswoman Julie
Peterson said the marks of Kalm-
bach's unique vision of the communi-
ty will'always exist.
"In his extraordinary career with
the University, he captured the most
intimate moments in the University's
life - our triumphs or trauma, as
well as the joy and accomplishments
of individuals in our community," she
said.
Associate Athletic Director for
Media Relations Bruce Madej said
Kalmbach was a major contribution
to the University's athletic program,
as he was responsible for photograph-
ing each sports team.
"He was just an individual who
could capture action," Madej said.
Madej said Kalmbach was dedicat-
ed to his work and did everything

necessar
"lie was,
positive -
away," he
Univer
Jane Elg
Kalmbac
she's ever
"We re
everythi
through,r
might hav
John V
editor of1
Kalmbac
the latterr
"I wou
hard for1
in the pas
was repla
would h
assignmer
Evenu
such asc
Kalmbac
work.
"We w
want toz
would go
Last JlU
his health
Despite hi
bach coat
events un
"The I
Michigan
lie was s
January,"
Peters
touched t
"Peopl
images th
are his,"
us as par
of remer
from."

)fler
bach
betes
y to get the job done well.
always a happy guy, always
- he was only a phone call
said.
sity Record Executive Editor
sass said she considered
h the most affable person
known.
elied on him for virtually
ng and he always came
no matter what our deadline
e been," she said.
Voodford, also an executive
the University Record, said
h suffered from diabetes in
portion of his life.
ild say his ailments made it.
him to get around as he did
t. Even when part of his leg
ced because of diabetes, he
ardly ever turn down an
nt," Woodford said.
under difficult conditions
climbing and bad weather.
h remained dedicated to his
ould ask him, You really
go out there?' and off he
," Woodford said.
ly, Kalmbach's concerns for
h brought him to retirement.
is progressing illness, Kalm-
tinued to photograph athletic
til last month,
last game he did was the
n/'ndiana basketball game.
till working in the middle of
Madej said.
on said Kalmbach always
hose around him.
e may not always realize the
hat they have the University
she said. "They will be with
t of our history, and as a way
nbering where we've come
Is over
drilling
o the lakes and sensitive coast-
gler, however, said Monday he
dent no harm would be done if
were followed.
e probably got some of the
, if not the very toughest,
equirements" in the nation, he
n interview with The Associ-
s.
eps. David Bonior of Mount
and Bart Stupak of Menomi-
Democrats, are preparing to
legislation that would outlaw
ce.
ling is allowed in our lakes,
could poison our drinking
I our fish and have catastrophic
nces to our tourism industry,
iid in a statement Tuesday.
.R
gFRVI'.

Presented by:
WOMEN' AKEBAL
Thursday, Feb. 15
vs. Iowa
7pm Crisler Arena
"Senior Night"
* B
Saturday, Feb. 17
vs. Minnesota
12:17pm Crisler Arena
Saturday, Feb. 17
vs. Southeast Missouri State
4pm Cliff Keen Arena

THIS WEEKEND IN
MICHIGAN ATHLETICS '

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Feb. 17-18 All Day
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Friday, Feb. 16
vs. Notre Dame
7:35pm Yost Ice Arena
Friday, Feb. 16
vs. Penn State
7pm Cliff Keen Arena
#2mET
Sunday, Feb. 18
vs. Oklahoma & UMass
1pm Cliff Keen Arena
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27,2001
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Food, Drinks and Fun!
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Parties at od
Great Lakes

TRAVERSE CITY (AP) - A fight
is brewing over a proposal to resume
leasing Great Lakes bottomlands for
land-based oil and gas drilling.
Michigan law prohibits drilling into
the lake bottoms from water-based
rigs. But since 1945 the state has
leased its bottomlands for oil and gas
production from onshore wells, a
process known as directional drilling.
Gov. John Engler and Mindy Koch,
head of the Department of Natural
Resources Land and Minerals Divi-
sion, said this week that they support-
ed new leases allowing such drilling.
But no final decision has been made,
Koch said Tuesday.
The state stopped issuing the leases in
late 1997, as critics warned of potential

damage t
lines. Eng
was confi
the rulesv
"We 'v
toughest
drilling r
said in am
ated Pres
U.S. R
Clemens
nee, both
introduce
the practi
"If dri
one spill
water, kil
conseque
Bonior sa

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