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January 23, 2001 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-01-23

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 23, 2001- 7

Protesters mark Roe, march on Supeme Court

WASHINGTON (AP) --- Buoyed by support
from a new president, tens of thousands of
abotion opponents marched to the Supreme
Court yesterday in a yearly protest ritual to
mark the landmark 1973 ruling that guarantees
*oman's right to abortion.
Under sunny skies, protesters young and old
gathered at the foot of the Washington Monu-
ment before the march, one contingent carry-
ing a banner that read, "Michigan Loves Our
Pro-Life President." Many others carried red
placards that read, "Face It: Abortion Kills
Children," and blue signs that said, "Defend
Life:"
The march - from 15th Street and Constitu-
tion Avenue NW to the Supreme Court -
which took about 35 minutes last year, took I
hours yesterday.
"There's no doubt about the enthusiasm from

the elections and that people were hoping very
much there would be an announcement (from
President Bush) regarding executive orders,"
said Nellie Gray, president of the March for
Life Fund, which has sponsored the annual
rally to protest the Supreme Court's 1973 deci-
sion in Roe v. Wade.
The crowd got both: A personal message
from Bush read by U.S. Rep. Christopher H.
Smith (R-N.J.) and a message from the White
House that the president would sign an execu-
tive order barring federal funds to international
family planning groups that offer abortion ser-
vices and counseling. The announcement came
eight years to the day that former President
Clinton suspended the measure by restoring
federal funds to such clinics worldwide.
Bush's message to the crowd was read by
Smith, one of the most outspoken abortion

opponents in Congress.
"Governor Bush wouldn't be President Bush
without pro-life Americans like you," Smith
said before reading Bush's statement, which
said, in part:
"Two days ago, Americans gathered at the
Washington Mall to celebrate our nation's
ideals. Today, you are gathered to remind our
country that one of those ideals is the infinite
value of every life.
"We share a great goal: to work toward a day
when every child is welcomed in life and pro-
tected in law. We know this will not come easi-
ly or all at once," Bush said. "But the goal
leads us onward: to build a culture of life,
affirming that every person, at every stage and
season of life, is created equal in God's image."
The president's words moved Renata Grzan,
of Laurel, Md., to tears as she stood on the

muddy Ellipse.
"This is a person who uneands, who has
integrity. You can tell he has/art that really
knows what's true," saidzan, a former
teacher at Mount deSales Ademy in Balti-
more County.
"I'm moved to finally I something from
the White House, to heatme acknowledg-
ment of us. He used ticords 'culture of
life,"' she said. "I feel'e again. This is a
grace-filled time."
The statement was tprst delivered to the
annual anti-abortion ralince then-Presidents
Ronald Reagan and frge Bush spoke to
marchers via loudspeanook-up.
The younger Busplnnouncement drew
immediate criticism n pro-choice groups,
which call the poli/he "global gag rule"
because it prohibitsrseas family planning

organizations that receive any U.S. aid from
even providing information on abortions. Many
abortion foes call it the "Mexico City policy"
because Reagan announced it at a 1984 popu-
lation conference there.
"If the president on Day One is willing to go
so far to violate the rights of women living out-
side the borders of this country, we are
extremely concerned with what's in store for
our 30,000 patients and the women throughout
the metropolitan area," said Jatrice Martel
Gaiter, president and chief executive officer of
Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washing-
ton, D.C.
Protesters proceeded from the Ellipse to the
Supreme Court, many praying the rosary aloud
or singing "God Bless America" and "Ave
Maria." There appeared to be no hecklers or
counter-demonstrators.

AMTRAK
Continued from Page 1
which also has its effects. "If you want
the service to stay, people have to ride
the train. From 1999 to 2000 there was
a 6.8 percent drop in the number of
Wengers on the Detroit to Chicago
~.e," Foran said.
The state has also taken steps to
attract high-speed trains - a possi-
bility that both Amtrak and the state
hope will increase train ridership.
According to MDOT, both the state
and Federal Railroad Administration
have each spent $11 million and
Amtrak, along with corporate partners,
have spent $9 million to improve the
railroad's infrastructure in Michigan
ittprovements believed to be neces-
y to bring the high-speed trains to
Michigan.
Testing of the high-speed trains has
already begun on test tracks near
Niles.
PRISONERS
Continued from Page 1
Authorities said a weekend tip
*mpted by the show "America's
Most Wanted" led to the capture.
The show had featured the convicts
four times since the escape, includ-
ing the last three Saturday nights.
Undersheriff Kevin Dougherty
said authorities were told about the
fugitives by the manager of the
Coachlight, a combination motel
and RV park where the motor home
was located. The park, tucked away
t d pine trees, was put under sur-
lance at 2 a.m. Monday, authori-
ties said.
Rivas and two others were arrest-
ed not at the RV park but as they
pulled up for gasoline at a conve-
nience store near Woodland Park.
the michigan daily
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SCOREKEEPERS PUB & GRILL is
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Please join Starcom
Word wide at the
Multicultural Career Fair
TODAY
Toesd~oy4, January 23rd
n0-4 pm
Michigan Union
ALL STUDENTS ARE
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Storom Woddids kathe Madios dn of
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Up in smoke

list day of trial nears;
)ean Lehman testifies

SAWSUIT
3ntinued from Page 1
iticism."
Also testifying yesterday was law
:ducation expert Kent Syverud,
ho is dean of Vanderbilt Law
School.
Syverud testified that he had ini-
tially been skeptical of admissions
policies which take race into
account but throughout his 14 years
of teaching has changed his mind.
Diversity, he said, is educational-
ly beneficial and a critical mass of
minority students is crucial to creat-
ing that diversity.
If a minority student is alone or
among few of his or her race, he said,
they may be hesitant to contribute to

the class lest they be labeled as a
spokesman for their race.
Racial diversity, he continued, is
something that he takes into account
when counseling prospective law stu-
dents on where to attend school.
"A law school without significant
representation will provide a signifi-
cantly poorer education," he said.
The intervenors will begin their
case today with testimony from
educational policy and race expert
Ken Orfield. Two LSA undergradu-
ate students, Erika Dowdell and
Agnes Aleobua, are also scheduled
to testify.
Massie said today's proceedings
are "a historic opportunity for us to
present the truth behind the lies
about meritocracy."

FRESHMEN
Continued from Page 1
study habits, University professors
have not noted a significant change
in students performance.
Economics Prof. Janet Gerson
said she has "not noticed any
upward trend in students grades."
The only trend Gerson said she has
detected throughout her experience
with incoming freshman is that they
consistently work hard.
Political science Prof. Ronald
Inglehart said he has not seen any
significant change in freshman
either. The only academic variation
he has witnessed has been stricter

grading by graduate student
instructors.
"Over the last 10 to 15 years the
GSIs have spontaneously become
tougher in their grading," Inglehart
said. He attributed this change not
to any departmental or University
influence, but to political views on
grading.
As for students, many at the Uni-
versity agreed with the UCLA
study. "The type of studying was
more of an adjustment than the
time," LSA freshman Chris White
said.
"I came to college knowing that
you are going to have to study a lot
more," he said.

The Popocatepetl Volcano spews a massive cloud of ash above the city of Puebla, Mexico yesterday. The eton nas
forced the evacuation of thousands of people from nearby towns.

SCOREKEEPERS PUB & GRILL is now
hiring part-time short order cooks. No
experience needed. 310 Maynard. 995-0100.
STUDENT WANTED TO WORK in
molecular biology research lab on the
Medical Campus. P/T (10-12 hr/wk.) position
that pays $8/hr. Call Sherry at 615-9712.
SUMMER MANAGEMENT positions.
Competitive pay. Flexible hours. Resume
builder. Now hiring for summer.
www.collegepro.com. 800-327-2468.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE needed for
website development. Earn a percentage of
unlimited revenues. Call for details
(810) 773-2953 or axmasterl@home.com
WORK STUDY POSITION IN SCHOOL
OF NURSING business and finance office.
Develope interpersonal, organizational,
professional, office, and computer skills.
Responsibilities include light typing,
copying, filing, telephone coverage, mail
sorting, and providing occasional assistance
to Dean's executive staff. 1-2 students
needed. $8-10 per hour. Contact Reva Frye at
764-8153.
WORK STUDY POSITIONS in
Neuroendocrinology lab. Animal care or
laboratory work. $8/hr. Contact Peter at 647-
2604, email pschluet@biology.lsa.umich.edu

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Everyone Welcome- No Experience Necessary!
Practices Monday 8:30-10 Wednesday & Friday 7-830
Held in the Martial ,pits room of the CCRB- Drop Ins Welcome
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BABYSITTER NEEDED for 21 mo. old in
my W. Plymouth home (10 min. from N.
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day/eve. Trans. and refs. req. Call Katie at
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B3ABYSITTER WANTED M, W,
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SPRING BREAK STILL AVAILABLE! - '
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LOWEST PRICE! Do you like your voice to be heard? Do you love performing in
front of crowds? Would you like to get paid for making people
laugh, think, learn? Res Rep Theatre Troupe (AKA Summer Troupe)
BOXING CLUB is looking for a Scriptwriter, an Assistant Director and Actors for
Attention Underclassmen! Athletes wanted to
try out for a new sport! We meet at the this summer's orientation theatre program. This program performs
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and heavier weights who played competitive
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If you are interested in the Scriptwriter or Assistant Director posi-
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BIGGEST POOL pK PA RTIES *TIf you are interested in being an Actor, auditions will be held Tues-
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