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November 08, 2000 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-11-08

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E~WEDNESDAY
LET. NOVEMBER 8,2000 5
Hieftje wins A2 mayoral race over Rapundalo

By David Enders
and Caitlin Nish
Daily StaffTReporters
After eight years of Republican leadership, the
city of Ann Arbor will have a Democratic mayor
next year. City Councilman John Hieftje defeated
Republican Stephen Rapundalo in a landslide victo-
ry last night.
Hieftje carried Ann Arbor Mayor
all of Ann Arbor's Hieftje Dem. 34,120
five wards, and as Rapundalo GOP 13,948
of 11:50 p.m. had Goodman Ub. ,849
p' As or 2 an.
30,033 votes to
Rapundalo's 12,516. Libertarian candidate Charles
Goodman had received 1,664 votes.
"I am ecstatic," Hieftje said. "It has been a
grass-roots effort. We had people out there on the
streets during the summer and all fall. We had a
very large number of people that wanted to help
us. This is a victory for people in the neighbor-
hoods, because I am a neighborhood person. We
now need to do everything we can to live up to
their expectations."
Rapundalo was undaunted by the loss in his first

run for elected office.
"For me, this is the beginning," Rapundalo said.
"This is my first campaign. We knew we were going
up against two well-oiled machines - the Democ-
rats and the Sierra Club. I'll see Mr. Hieftje two
years from now.
"It was a lot of fun," Rapundalo said. "It was a
great learning experience to go for the top job in the
first campaign."
A real estate agent, Hieftje's platform included
making housing more affordable in Ann Arbor.
"I would think his real estate connections would
help as far as reaching the goal of more affordable
housing," said University Social Work second-year
student Karen Parker, who attended a gathering of
local Democratic candidates at Arbor Brewing Com-
pany last night.
In addition, Hieftje said he plans to address on-
campus housing.
"He's said for a long time now that there needs
to be better cooperation between the University
and the city," said Bill Hamson, Hieftje's commu-
nications manager. "For instance, he has said
many times the University needs to build more
student housing. I bet as mayor, if he champions

that issue, it will be hard for the University not to
listen."
"I am delighted, I think he has a good green con-
sciousness -- an unusually green consciousness -
given that he's a realtor," Ann Arbor resident Tom
Fricke said.
Ingrid Sheldon, Ann Arbors' Republican mayor
for the past eight years, ran Rapundalo's campaign.
"Looking at the results that are coming in tonight,
I'm glad I retired," said Sheldon, who decided not to
run for re-election. "You always know Ann Arbor is
going to be predominantly Democratic, (as a Repub-
lican) it's just whether you can get your message
across.
Sheldon said she thought the campaign was run
fairly by both sides and the next two years will be
challenging for the Democratic majority.
"I think it's going to be difficult for the majority
realizing that this is a diverse city to have policies
that balance all these competing needs," Sheldon
said.
Goodman remained focused on his Libertarian
platform following the loss.
"People can run their own lives better than the
government can run it for them," he said.

JUSTIN FiTZPATRICK/Daily
John Hieftje, Ann Arbor's newly elected Democratic mayor, celebrates his victory
at Arbor Brewing Company last night. Hieftje carried all five of the city's wards.

Rivers wins fourth term in Congress

By Anna Clark
and Lisa Hoffman
Daily StatiReporters
Lynn Rivers secured her fourth term in
Congress yesterday by defeating Republican
challenger and political newcomer Carl Berry.
As of 2 a.m., with 63 per-
cent of precincts reporting, U.S.
Rivers led in the race for
Michigan's 13th District seat Bery G
with 66 percent of the vote
over Berry's 33 percent.
Rivers said she was comfortable enough
with her position in the race to spend elec-
tion night with other local Democratic can-
didates who had "a harder time."
"This was a low-key race for me," Rivers
(D-Ann Arbor) said. "It wasn't even partic-
ularly negative, which was wonderful.
These things usually get pretty ugly."

....
Th
't1P

Berry conceded Rivers' victory at 10:30
p.m. last night while gathering with friends,
family and community members at a restau-
rant in his hometown of Plymouth.
"The numbers don't look good, but
tomorrow morning could be a different
story," Berry said during his concession
speech last night. "If I get 20
louse percent or better, I will feel
(i) 91,286 like winner.,"
45,824 Rivers said she ran on the
Asam. campaign issues she has
always won with because
they reflect her and her constituents' views.
Since her election to Congress in 1994,
Rivers has worked for advancements in
higher education, campaign finance reform,
improving Social Security and Medicare
and protecting people's financial, medical,
genetic and Internet privacy.
"Education is far and away my number one

priority," she said, adding that the environ-
ment and women's right to have an abortion
were also important.
Rivers said that during the upcoming term
she hopes to continue the progress she has
made and remain faithful to her constituents
in the 13th District, which includes Washte-
naw County and western Wayne County.
Berry, a retired Plymouth police chief,
said he had a lot of respect for Rivers after
conceding the race.
"I will be around and make sure she is
socially and fiscally responsible," he said. "I
always look forward to next time."
Patricia Skrobe, the Washtenaw County
Democratic Party chairwoman, said she was
satisfied with Rivers' victory.
"Lynn Rivers is one of the great people
that we send to Washington," Skrobe said.
"She's got a proven record and she cares
about her community. You can't find a per-

son as good as Lynn."
Teresa Folino, vice chairwoman of the- 13th
Congressional District Republican Commit-
tee, said Berry made a strong showing.
"I had no doubt that Lynn Rivers Was
going to come out victorious;' Folino said.
"I also feel very strongly for a man to :go
out there and work a grass-roots campaign,
and to take 30 percent of the vote says a lot
for the true importance and voice of the
grass-roots.
Ann Arbor resident Betsy Aulier said she
voted for Rivers based on the congress-
woman's campaign issues.
"She's the pro-choice candidate, she
spends people's money wisely and she's a
very dedicated public servant," Aulier said
during a gathering for local Democratic
candidates at Arbor'Brewing Company. "In
addition, she's very supportive of civil
rights and the environment."

JUSTIN FITZPATRICK/Daly
Newly re-elected Congresswoman Lynn Rivers (D-Ann Arbor)
celebrates her victory over her opponent, retired police chief
Carl Barry, last night.

Kolb takes Brater's
seat in state House

Dems sweep
4 races for
City Counci
By Robert Gold
and Rachel Green
Daily Staff Reporters
Democrats kept a stranglehold in the Ann Arbor city
council following last night's election as party members
won the four contested races. Republican incumbent Joe
Upton ran uncontested in Ward II.

By Jodie Kaufman
and James Restivo
Daily Staff Reporters
University alum Chris Kolb will make
the leap from the Ann Arbor City Council
to the Michigan Legislature after easily
defeating Republican challenger Bob
Bykowski last night to retain Rep. Liz
Brater's 53rd District seat for
the Democrats.
As of 2 a.m., Kolb had 76 Stat
percent of the vote, with 53rd
Bykowski taking the remain- Kolb
ing 24 percent. Bykowski
"If I can even fill Liz's
shoes that will be a major
accomplishment," Kolb said.
Brater, who must leave Lansing after
three terms due to term limits, said she is
happy Kolb will be her successor.
"I am very, very deli-hted Chris is tak-
ing my place in Lansing," Brater said. "He
will do an excellent job continuing to
work on the issues I have been working
on, including the environment, health care
and education."
"I look forward to seeing him articulate
progressive issues in Lansing, which is so
sorely needed there," she said.
Kolb, who has made unsuccessful bids
to unseat Ann Arbor Mayor Ingrid Shel-
don, credited his victory last night to his

D
G

multitude of experience, including his four
years on the City Council, his work as an
environmental consultant and his time as a
legislative assistant to Rep. John Hansen
()-Dexter) in Lansing.
"I feel I am uniquely qualified, and I hope
to combine all of the assets of my experi-
ence to help to pass good laws to address
the issues we all care about;' Kolb said.
Bykowski said
although his first run for
House political office didn't turn
istrict out in his favor, he
em 21,000 wouldn't rule out a sec-
OP 6,688 ond shot down the road.
AS of4 2aO He said he knew his inex-
perience in the public
arena put him at a disadvantage so his
campaigning was based on going out into
the community and meeting the voters.
"I knew it was going to be an uphill bat-
tle uoin_ into it," Bvkowski said. "I ran
because I wanted to take part in communi-
ty service. It felt good going from door-to-
door and actually meeting people."
Bykowski said he and his team met
about 9,000 people through grass-roots
campaigning.
Kolb said lie hopes to make a quality
education a realistic opportunity for all.
"I am going to work to increase support
for public education including higher edu-
cation, making it more affordable," Kolb

Democratic incumbents.
Steve Hartwell (Ward IV)
won easily. Carlberg
defeated Republican candi-
date Gary Vandermade and
Hartwell beat Republican
Jeff Harshe.
"I thought Jeff gave a
good run," Harshe said.
"The fourth ward is always
a swing ward. It's always a
nailbiter."
Around 9:30 p.m.
Harshe was not ready to
concede defeat, but he said.
"It was a good experience,
just bad results."
Harshe said he plans to

Jean Carlberg (Ward Ill) and

City
Ward I
Robinson I
7Ramirez I
Ward III
Carlberg
Denoyer I
Vandermades
Ward Ill
Ha4rtwell
Harshe
Nowak
Saletta I
WLard V
Easthope
Hagopian +
Purdy

Council
Dem. 5,688
Ind. 1565
Demt.(i) 6,594
Lib_ 2,322
GOP 380
Dem. (i) 5,190
GOP 3,746
Green 910
Lib. 198
Dem. 8,648
GOP 2,587
Lib. 441
A$, D 2a.

JUSTIN FITZPATRICK/Daily
Newly elected State Rep. Chris Kolb applauds as he watches election results last night at
Arbor Brewing Company. Kolb won a seat as the 53rd District representative.

said. "I am going to make sure U of M
gets a fair shake up in Lansing, and I will
fight for more funding to the University."
Kolb also said he wants to improve the
quality of the environment, "so we can
breathe clean air and drink clean water."
In his acceptance speech last night at
Arbor Brewing Company, Kolb said his
new position is about "opening up doors

of opportunity for everyone, making
everyone an equal partner in society."
Bykowski said he is simply pleased that
he made the effort to run for office.
"I would rather lose a seat by fighting
for it rather than just giving it away,"
Bykowski said. He said he plans to return
to his profession as a commercial real
estate appraiser.

a:.v

Hansen cruises to victory for
two more years in Legislature

return to his job as a commercial real-estate broker.
"I'll go back to work and just try to help the private sec-
tor," he said.
Two ward contests featured newcomers as longtime council
members Toni Hanna-Davies (D-Ward 1) and Elizabeth Daley
(D-Ward V) stepped down. Democrat Jean Robinson defeated
independent Anthony Ramirez while Chris Easthope (D-Ward
V) beat Republican candidate Todd Hagopian.
During his term Easthope said he wants to concentrate on
affordable housing and the city's infrastructure.
Hagopian said he was pleased with his double-digit results,
although he did not win. "I had a good campaign," he said.
"For running a campaign for $500, that's the best we can do."
Ramirez said he wanted to run on the Democratic ticket
but he lost the primaries earlier this year.
"I can take these defeats," Ramirez said. "It's no big thing.:
Following the elections nine Democrats and two Republi-
cans compose city council and the mayoral seat. Currently,
eight Democrats and three Republicans hold these positions.
The new council is not complete, however. The council
must vote in two new members following the departure of
Democrats Chris Kolb and John Hieftje. Hieftje replaces
outgoing Republican Mayor Ingrid Sheldon. Kolb will leave
the council in January to serve in the State House.
Harshe said he was concerned with the liberal slant in Ann
Arbor. "Ann Arbor's a very partisan city and there's a lot of

By Lindsey Alpert
and Jacquelyn Nixon
Daily Staff Reporters
Democratic incumbent John
Hansen won a landslide victory yes-
terday over Republican candidate
Scott Wojack in his bid for re-election
to the 52nd District seat in the Michi-
gan Legislature.
As of 2 a.m., Hansen State

wards I, 11 and V in Ann Arbor.
Ann Arbor resident Chad Bailey
said Hansen's campaign slogan, "For
Kids of All Ages," contributed to the
representative's victory and fairly rep-
resented his commitment to his con-
stituents.
Bailey also said Hansen's general
perspectives on life make him a good
representative for the
louse general community.
1 -JL.1. "Ftce honnitahleto

he gained in the education system
was all he took to the Legislature two
years ago.
"It took me a while to get used to
the partisanship," Hansen said.
"Now I'm used to it, but I don't
like it."
His Republican challenger, Scott
Wojack, finished his first campaign
last night. He placed his primary
focus on education, supporting
school vouchers and hrainstormint

1

-v i

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