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November 08, 2000 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-11-08

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NATION/WORLD~--------

2 --The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 8, 2000

Crane cited in jet crash

TAOYUAN, Taiwan (AP) - One week after the deadly
crash of a Singapore Airlines jetliner, the airport runway
remains an eerie memorial: Melted suitcases, crumpled
shirts, a Hello Kitty doll, scattered pink and purple socks
and a mangled construction crane.
Investigators confirmed for the first time yesterday that it
was the crane that ripped open the belly of the jumbo jet as
t hurtled down the wrong runway.
Eighty-two people died in the fiery takeoff attempt.
"Bodies just began to fall out," David Lee, an investigator
with Taiwan's Aviation Safety Council, told reporters at
Chiang Kai-shek Airport during the first close public look
at the runway wreckage.
Last week, when crash experts disclosed the contents of
the 'black box' cockpit recorder of Flight SQ006, they
would only confirm that the pilot picked the wrong runway

and that there was a series of collisions as the plane sped
down the airstrip.
Investigators offered the most detailed account yet of the
crash yesterday. Seconds after the jet began its takeoff, a
front wheel hit a concrete barrier about 4,950 feet down the
runway. Then the plane slammed into a crane that peeled
open its underside, Lee said.
"Bodies just began to fall out," David Lee, an investigator
with Taiwan's Aviation Safety Council, told reporters at
Chiang Kai-shek Airport during the first close public look
at the runway wreckage.
Last week, when crash experts disclosed the contents of
the 'black box' cockpit recorder of Flight SQ006, they
would only confirm that the pilot picked the wrong runway
and that there was a series of collisions as the plane sped
down the airstrip.

Palestine
ask for
protection
force
JERUSALEM (AP) - The Pales-
tinians pressed for an international
protection force despite U.S. objec-
tions as new clashes erupted in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip yesterday.
A Palestinian was killed by Israeli
fire.
A second Palestinian died yester-
day of injuries sustained last week.
The two deaths bring to 175 the
number of people killed in Israeli-
Palestinian fighting since Sept. 28.
Most of the victims have been Pales-
tinian.
Israel's navy said a suicide
bomber apparently was aboard a
fishing boat that exploded overnight
near an Israeli patrol boat off the
Gaza Strip,
The Israeli vessel was not dam-
aged. The fishing boat came from
Egypt but the assailant apparently
was Palestinian, an Israeli security
source said on condition of
anonymity.
Also yesterday, Israel permitted
Gaza International Airport to reopen
during daylight hours. Two flights
landed, including a German military
plane taking 23 Palestinians serious-
ly wounded in recent clashes to Ger-
many for treatment.
Israel had closed the airport short-
ly after Israeli-Palestinian fighting
broke out and a bus carrying Israeli
workers came under fire.

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Setting air-quality limits under questii
WASHINGTON I Hearing arg~uments in a rmajor clean-air case, sgV
Supreme Court justices expressed doubts yesterday about requiring the gov
A lawyer for industry groups asked the justices to rule that federal Clean
Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to weigh the cost of reduc
harmful emissions against the benefits of irmproved air quality.
"This agency wishes to regulate every nook and cranny of this environm
for air pollution reasons" without a clear standard for doing so, said Edw
Warren, representing the American Trucking Associations, U.S. Chamber
Commerce and other business groups.
Justice John Paul Stevens said Warren appeared to be seeking at rule that
EPA must set air-quality standards "to protect the public health, provided it dd
n't cost too much."
Justice Antonin Scalia questioned whether requiring an analysis of e
would create a clearer standard for setting air-quality limits. "Why doe
give you a standard to address the economic effects of the thing?"
asked.
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor told Warren, "I've listened to a lot of vagu
guage from you and I don't understand what it is that you're saying."
EntreM ed cancer The case for endostatin remains
from proven, and the studies wh
drug shows promise results are being reported this w
were designed mainly to test whet
WASHINGTON -- A much- the drug can be administered saf
watched drug under development by a Still, shares of EntreMed have been
Rockville, Md., company shows bio- ing for weeks on speculation abo
logical effects that may make it useful Amsterdam conference.
in the treatment of cancer, according to
preliminary evidence made public this
week in Europe. Group challenges
Data from early human tests of r op ach al es
the drug, endostatin, are to be pre-
sented Thursday at a scientific con- WASHINGTON - Some of t
ference in Amsterdam. Limited data nation's largest information servi
released late Sunday to scientists want a federal judge to overturn n
registering for the conference show privacy regulations that they say co
that the drug appears safe, at least at disrupt the growin'g market for peop
relatively low doses, and has biolog- names, addresses, Social Security
ical effects in humans that indicate bers and other personal information.
some anti-cancer potential. Last week's request by the Individt
Results for the drug are being Reference Services Group is part of
watched closely on Wall Street. Shares legal battle regarding the privacy pro
of EntreMed Inc., the Rockville compa- sions Congress wrote into the financ
ny sponsoring its development, have services deregulation bill last year.
been wildly volatile, selling for as high Credit bureaus sold "credit headc
as S98.50 and as low as $12.88, since reports containing personal data
endostatin and another drug were the information brokers, who then tei
subject of a report in the New York them to private investigators,
Times in 1998. enforcement authorities and others.
AROUND THE WORLD
Yugoslav protests solid vitory for Kostunia Demo
is Opposition of Serbia in the Dec
turn ugly under fire elections, his camp is woied thei.
port could erode as pro-democr
NIS, Yugoslavia -- Protests at two euphoria is replaced by disencha
prisons in Yugoslavia turned ugly yes- over price increases, energy shot
terday with shots fired, buildings set and other hardships. While the cc
ablaze and a female inmate reporting an my was destroyed under Milose
orgy of rape" as Serbs went on a ram- there is fear his successors will har
page to demand better jail conditions the blame.
and amnesty for certain convictions.
The unrest, which began Sunday Russia gives up on
with a riot at a third prison, presented Kursk recover
the latest challenge to new President
Vojislav Kostunica. Even as his gov- MOSCOW ---The Norw
ernment tries to consolidate its authori- seagoing platform Regalia dep
ty, it faces a decade of pent-up yesterday from the scene of the sunk
discontent accumulated nider the pre- Russian submarine Kursk after recov
vious regime that now threatens to spill ing 12 of the 118 victims and shedi
over into growing anarchy. light on vessel's massive damage.
Kostunica and his supporters control Divers today abandoned efforts to
governmnent on the federal level but not deeper into the the living quarte
in the two Yugoslav republics. With because damage was so severe and th
elections in Serbia six weeks away, could not move. They inserted
allies of ousted President Slobodan remote-control device into the fif
Milosevic will remind voters that the compartment, where the nuclear react
disorder would not have been tolerated is located.
while he was in charge.
Although opinion polls now project a - Compiedfom Daily ire repor
(Jl : a I .

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students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term. starting in September, via U.S. mail ar
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily. 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor. Michigan 48109-1327.
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E-mail letters to the editor to daily.letters@umich.edu. World Wide Web: www.michigandailycom.
NEWS Jewel Gopwani, Managing Edi
EDITORS: Nick Bunkley, Michael Grass, Nika Schulte, Jaimie Winkler
STAFF: Lindsey Alpert. Kisten Beaumont. Anna Clark. Laura Oeneau. Lzze Eihre. Whitney Eliot. David Enders, Jen F:sn. Robert Gold.
Kista Guilo. Rachei Green. Lisa Hoffman. Eizabeth Kassab. Jodie Kaufman. Yael Kohen. Lsa Koivu. Jane KrulL Hanna LOi4aO'n. Susan L
Jacquelyn Nixon. Catlin Nish. Jer my W. Peters. Nataie Plosky. James Restivo, Karen Schar tz. Tara D. Sharma. Mana Sprow.
Came Thorson. Johanna Wetmore.
CALENDAR: Lndsey Alpert: GRAPHICS: Scott Gordon
EDITORIAL Emily Achenbaum, Managing Edi
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Peter Cunniffe, Ryan DePletro, Josh Wickerham, Nicholas Woomer
STAFF: Dane Barnes. Ryan Bla . Kevmn Clune. Chip Cilen. Sumon Dantrki Seth Fishe. Lea Frost. Rob Goodspeed jJessic Guein.
Aubrey Henretty. Henry Hyatt. Shaina Khator. Patrick Kley. Cortney Konner. Cns Ka. Thomas Kug'rgs Cnr e w atye,
Erin MCQuno Del Mende,. Manish Rap Branden Sant. Rachael Smith, Wj Syi. Katie Tibald-
SPORTS David Den Herder, Managing Edil
SENIOR EDITORS: chris Duprey, Mark Francescutti, Geoff Gagnon, Stephanie Offen
NIGHT EDITORS: Raphael Goodstein. Arun Gopal Michael Kern. Ryan C. Moloney. Jon Schwartz. Dan wilams
STAFF: Rohit Bhave. Michael Bloom. Chris Burke. Kareem Copeiand. Sam Duwe. Kristen Fidh. Rhonda Gmer. Richard Haddad. David
Horn. Steve Jackson. Nick Kacher. Shawn Kemp, Albert Kim. Nathan Lnsley. Peter Lund. James Mercier. David Mosse. Jeff Phliips. D
Roth, Naweed Sikora. Benjamin Singer. Jeb Singer. Joe Smith.
ARTS Gabe Fajuri, Chris Kula, Editc
ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Ben Goldstein
WEEKEND, ETC. EDITORS: Jenni Glenn, Elizabeth Pensler
SUB-EDITORS: Matt Barrett iFiii mRobyn Meiaied Fine'Per foiming Ar. lGina Hamadcy i Books. Jennifer fogel iTVt New Media. Jon l MuCic.
STAFF: Gautam Oaks. Ryan Bia. Leslie iBoxer. Rob Broide. lee Cirang. Chrrslopier Cousino, Katie Den iceyker. Re-k Dems. JIcC De-keison K.r
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McClear. W Jacarl Melton. Shannon 0 Sulhvan. Lsa Ra .il Darren Ringel. Jim Schiff. Jacuelene Smith. Luke Smith. Andy Taylor-Fabc K c
PHOTO Louis Brown, Jessica Johnson, E
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: David Katz, Marjorie Marshall
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STAFF: Peter Conue. Rachel Feieriian. JustOn Iitzpainc -Sam Hollenstaid. Jeff Hurvitz. Michael Hynes. JoCe Lee " Carr .r e Dan
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ONLINE Rachel Berger, Paul Wong, Managing Editc
STAFF: Kiran Ducela. Dana M. Goldberg. Sommy Ko. Mark McKinstry Vince Sust
CONSULTANT: Satadru Pramank
r 7 l/ M.I' 11 II 1 T. 1 - l l cU lffl7 U

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