100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 2000 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:

LOCAL/S TATE

The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 3, 2000 -

Ann Arbor Police work to com bat.
e1

c
X

CARRIE MCGEE/Daly
John Cusack speaks yesterday at Hill Auditorium at a Democratic rally
celebrating the 80th anniversary of the women's right to vote.

gang znjue
GANGS
Continued from Page 1
"There is a lot of education in the community as a
whole, starting from our own police department, stuf'
at all the schools, parents to (parent teacher organiza-
tions) on awareness and identification," El-Ayoubi
said.
But even with the high success of these programs
and others like it that combat gang activity in Washte-
naw County and the surrounding areas, some high
school students still say that gang affiliations are com-
mon.
"We're the Diag rats. Anything that goes on in Ann
Arbor, we know about. There are gangs around," said
one 16-year old Ann Arbor high school student, who
requested that his name not be printed.
The student, who wears baggy jeans and clothes like
those prohibited from Pinball Pete's, said he was at one
time affiliated with a gang.
Steve Nawojcsyk, a juvenile justice consultant locat-
ed out of Little Rock, Arkansas, said looks can be
deceiving.
"I always tell people that it is very difficult to look at
an individual and tell that, because of movies or TV,
that they are in a gang. Baggy pants and bandannas are
just what kids wear now."
Nawojcsyk added that Pinball Pete's dress code is an
approach to curbing gang related behavior that is simi-
lar to those of many schools across the nation.
"A lot of schools try to institute a no-gang attire pol-
icy but it's so difficult to tell what is gang-related cloth-
ing," Nawojesyk said. "The only way to do that is to
make kids wear uniforms."
Considering that this approach is not feasible for
stopping gang affiliation on city streets, El-Ayoubi said
she meets with officers from other jurisdictions to dis-
cuss the appearance of trends and sort through written
information confiscated from gangs.
"A lot of times, because gang members are not per-
manently situated, they tend to be transient from neigh-

WOMEN
Continued from Page 1
} "I don't want to wake up Wednes-
day morning and say I didn't lend my
name, or whatever little I could do, to
stop a Bush presidency," he said
before the event.
Cusack made unfavorable com-
ments about Republican Texas Gov.
George W. Bush on several issues.
"To me, underneath this nice,
warm frat boy kinda thing is a bunch
of arch conservatives just waiting to
get the country back," Cusack said.
Admitting that he reveres Ralph
Nader, Cusack said in the situation of
the tight election he feels the Green
Party candidate is "dead wrong" by
campaigning in swing states.
Even though the event celebrat-
ed 80 years of women having the
right vote in federal elections,
speakers last night focused less
on women's issues and more on
pcampaigning for the Democratic
ticket.
Michigan Supreme Court Justice
candidate Marietta Robinson
invoked boos from the crowd when
she talked about the Republican
Supreme Court majority.
"Our courts have been taken over
by Engler's politicians," she said.
Robinson appears without par-
tisanship on the ballot and urged
voters to remember her name and
er colleagues Edward McCall
Thomas and F. Thomas Fitzgter-
ald.
"There's no excuse for forgettin"
me, I'm the only woman there,"
Robinson said.
When Lieberman took the stage,
she received several standing ova-
tions and a rendition of "Happy
Birthday" celebrating her 86th birth-
ay on Wednesday.
After her speech, Lieberman said

she felt that she was friends with the
audience. "You will do right by Joe's
mother," she said.
Serving as emcee and speaker,
Rivers (D-Ann Arbor) - who is
running for re-election against
Republican Carl Berry -- spoke
about the reversal of Roe v. Wade.
Many Democrats are saying they
fear the loss of abortion rights if
Bush is elected Tuesday.
Rivers retorted against com-
ments she said Nader made on
television within in the past few
days, accusing him of trivializing
the abortion issue.
"Ralph Nader is free to build a
third party ... but he is not free to
build it on the backs of women,"
Rivers said.
The last speaker on the roster was
Senate candidate Debbie Stabenow,
who spoke on several issues facing
the nation.
"I wish I had a dollar for every
time somebody said to me 'Educa-
tion is the most important thing'
and then they go off and do some-
thing else," she said.
Returning to the night's theme,
Stabenow said, "There are only
nine women (in the U.S. Senate)
and I think there ought to be at
least 10."
Stabenow is one of three
women running for the U.S. Sen-
ate alone with fellow Democrats
First Lady Ilillary Clinton in New
York and Maria (artwell in Wash-
ington.
If elected, Stabenow would be
Michigan's first female U.S. senator.
The senate hopeful also cam-
paigned for Gore.
"It's not about if you want to have
a beer with somebody," she said.
"Have a beer with George Bush and
elect Al Gore the President of the
United States."

nces among yout
"It's easy to take the kid out of the gang but hard to
take the gang out of the kid."
- Adele EI-Ayoubi
Ann Arbor Police crime prevention specialist

borhood to neighborhood. It's not uncommon to have
gang members move from one area to another," El-
Ayoubi said.
Gang specialists refer to these members as "trans-
fers." Nawojcsyk said that transfers are one of the
ways that gang culture spreads.
"The first way is recruitment. Hard-core gang mem-
bers recruit kids to become gang members and drug
dealers, these are synonymous. The second way is
transfers. It's easy to take the kid out of the gang but
hard to take the gang out of the kid," Nawojcsyk said.
Nawojcsyk's point can be illustrated by an 18-year
old Ann Arbor resident who calls himself Shotgun.
Shotgun said he grew up in Detroit where he was
part of a Los Angeles-based gang. Shotgun still bears
a tattoo branding and scar that he received as a mem-
ber of that gang.
"I was an innocent bystander. I was standing
next to a house where there was a drive-by. I
started to run because the crackheads next door
started shooting. I got shot in my left wrist with a
shotgun," he said.
Though he still has the physical reminders of the
gang, he said he would not use his real name because
he had left the gang and was planning to enter the
army so that he could go to college.
Nawojesyk said it is not totally uncommon for for-
mer gang members like Shotgun to attend college.
"Usually it goes dormant in college because
they move away from their respective homes," he
stid.
But Nawoicsyk also said these students may still

affiliate themselves with their gangs while at cdlege
even ifthey are not active members.
"There's still students who associate withgangs
before they go there and still have a feeling that they
are in the gang because the gang becomes like family.
That feeling can be displaced by a fraternity or sorority
or club or school," he said. "I'm not saying they're
organized, but there are people who were involved in
gangs in all walks of life now, be it in academia, the
military or in work settings."
El-Ayoubi said some gangs go as far as se Oing
their members to college.
"Some gangs will keep their members clean of all
criminal activity and send them to college so that they
would maintain ties and later put to use the knowledge
they attained in college to help better their gang,' she
said.
She added that the little gang activity Ann Arbor
does have may be a result of the Ann Arbor's diverse
University atmosphere.
"Our gangs are very loosely knit. But because we
are a college city, we attract people from all over the
world. Our gangs are as diverse as our city, they cross
all ethnic and racial backgrounds, socio-economics
and gender," El-Ayoubi said.
Because of the strides taken in the past Ann
Arbor isn't facing the problems that other cities
are having with gangs. But El-Ayoubi added that
this shouldn't make residents think that there is no
problem.
"Never say never. If we close our eyes and are not
aware, we won't see it coming," she said.
WteVOTERS
Continued from Page 1
will turn out.
"Wouldn't that be wonderful ifowe
y year all were wrong?" Boyd said.
igh profile Boyd said the projected increase -.'4
igott said. percent - is so low because they are
sing mas- expecting this election to be the catalyst
nd spend- for a gradual increase in voter turnout.
,w York is "We're hoping to reverse the drop in
turnout by seeing a slight increase from
elieve the 1996. 1 think we simply have to look at
favor. this as ground we're making up," she
s lead is a said.

Dems look to win back the Sent

SENATE
Continued from Page 1
Abraham, Conrad Burns of Mon-
tana, Rhode Island's Lincoln
Chafee, Washington's Slade Gor-
don, Rod Grams of M innesota,
Delaware's William Roth and John
Ashcroft of Missouri.
The circumstances surrounding
Ashcroft's vulnerability are particu-
larly unusual.
Ashcroft was being challenged by
Democratic Missouri Gov. Mel Carna-
han, who was killed in a plane crash
last month. Because Carnahan's name
cannot be removed from the ballot, he
could still win the election.
In this case the state's new gover-
nor would appoint someone to fill
the seat. Carnahan's wife, Jean, has
announced she would be willing to
fill her late husband's seat and the
governor has indicated he would
appoint her.
The appointment of a deceased

politician's wife to his post is not an
uncommon move, University political
science Prof. Michael Traugott said.
"What's unusual is that the candidate
died before the electionl," he said.
Adding an even more bizarre twist
to the Missouri race, recent polling has
shown the deceased Carnahan with a
slight lead over Ashcroft.
"We're glad she decided to accept
the appointment should Governor
Carnahan win. We feel she'd be the
best person to accept the job,"
DiMartino said.
The closest watched Senate race
in the country is the New York
showdown between first lady
Hillary Clinton and Republican
Rep. Rick Lazio.
This race, much like the one in
Michigan, is anything but amicable
and is characterized by massive
;amounts of advertising spending.
According to the Federal Election
Commission's latest figures, Clin-
ton and Lazio have spent a corn-

billed S59 million.
"This is a big money
around ... and this is a h
race in particular,"Train
"Both candidates are rai
sive amounts of money a
ing massive amounts. Ne
an expensive place to run.
Democrats say they b
race is tilted in Clinton's f
"We think the first lady
confident one. We feel h
will register with New Y
more than Rick Lazio's ca
personal attacks," DiMart
Overall, Republican
they have the upper hand
the Senate races but in a
races this year.
"Republicans are enthi
around the country," H
"We're seeing party lo
intensity we haven't seen
days of Ronald Reagan
bodes well for candidat
down the ticket."

ier agenda
'ork voters
impaign of
no said.
s contend
in not only
ill national
usiastic all
Holt said.
yalty and
since the
n and this
es up and

Jackson Rd.@Wagnerw734-82-2837
One Mile West of Webers Inn
$5.00 Matinees til 6pm & all dayTuesday
$4.75 Kids & Seniors ali shows
$5.75 with Student ID
$5.75 Late Shows Fri & Sat ' ' '
No asses or Tuesday discounts"
Unlimited Free Drink Refills &.25c Corn Refills

I

LL MATINEES!
fURDAY & SUNDAY 10&11 AM
POKEMON 2000 (G)

NEED EXTRA INCOME? Earn money THE CHOP HOUSE/ LA DOLCE Vita is *** FREE Spring Break Trips *** Book
easily ss selling sprint PCS Wireless or MCI now hiring a pastry server. Someone creative 15 or more to Cancun, Mazatlan, Acapulco,
rele your classmates! Contact Brad to design and plate our world class desserts. Jamaica, Florida, or S. Padre and you go
@intemtn5934aling.co email to brad Exp. not necessary. Apply in person daily FREE! Reliable TWA flights. Best Prices.
after l0am @ 322 S. Main. Enter through Call Now! 1.800.SURFS.UP
NEF SOnME QUICK MONEY? back door. wwwstudentexpress.com

Campusfundraiser.com is the answer!
Pledge classes earn $1,000-$2,000 with the
easy Campusfundraiser.com three hour
fundraising event. No sales required.
Fundraising dates are filling quickly, so call
today! Contact Campusfundraiser.com at
(888) 923-3238, or visit
www camousfundriser.com
:I W ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for
VT supervisors @ $12/hr. for the school
year. Please call Honey Creek Community
School at 994-2636.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for
lunch supervisors and a certified lifeguard @
$12fhr. for the school year. Please call Honey
Creek Community School at 994-2636.
PAI{T TIME LEASING/OFFICE HELP
University Towers is a 240 unit student
housing property, looking for office help on
the weekends. Must be people oriented and
dependable. Saturday 10-5, Sunday 12-5
,responsibilities include general office work
some leasing. $8.00 per hour plus
mmission.
Send or fax resume to:
University Towers
Leasing Director
536 S. Forest Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Fax: 734-761-2027
PLAY A GAME, GET PAID $15-$30.
Paid subjects needed for experiments this fall
and winter. Guaranteed $10/hr. or more for
1-2 hour experiments. Flexible scheduling
including evening and weekend times. Get
our mailing list for dates and times! Send
ur name and phone number to:
experiments@umich.edu.
SCOREKEEPERS is now hiring part-time
short order cooks. No experience necessary.
310 Maynard. 995-0100.
SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS needed at all
levels, 90 hrs. college credit required, $71.64
per day to start, 15 minutes north of Ann

WAITERS, WAITRESSES, Bartenders,
Cooks, and Managers Wanted for local
restaurants. Fax resume to (734) 629-0345 or
log on to www.needwaitstaff.com
WAITSTAFF
HOSTS
BARTENDERS
BUSSERS
FT/PT. All shifts, days, dinners,and late
nights. Great place to work. Apply at Pizza
House, 618 Church. 995-5095. For more
information contact Dana or Cathy.
WANTED: DO SOME OF YOUR family
members smoke while others do not? If so,
join a study at UofM on genetics & smoking.
Earn $$. Call 734-763-9000, #6311. Travel to
Ann Arbor not necessary!
WEBSITE DESIGNERS WANTED.
Experience with HTML and Photoshop
required. Part-time, Very Flexible Schedule.
Salary Negotiable. Call 248-882-7015 or
email jobs@igdsolutions.com
FEMALE NON SMOKING student pref.
for occas. childcare in my home. Exp,
references, and transportation necessary.
Evenings and weekends. 975-8901.
RELIABLE CHILDCARE person.
References requested. To care for 3 children
as needed. 662-0070.
tikes traeve l

***ACT NOW! GUARANTEE THE
BEST SPRING BREAK PRICES!
SOUTH PADRE, CANCUN, JAMAICA,
BAHAMAS, ACAPULCO, FLORIDA &
MADRIGRAS. REPS NEEDED...
TRAVEL FREE, EARN $$$.- GROUPS
DISCOUNT FOR 6+. 800-838-8203/
WWW.LEISURETOURS.COM.
*EARLY SPECIALS! Spring Break
Bahamas Party Cruise! 5 Days $279!
Includes Meals, Parties! Awesome Beaches,
Nightlife! Departs From Florida! Get Group -
Go Free!! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386.
2 SEASON Michigan Basketball Tickets:
Available in blue section with 30yr. priority
for $550. If interested send letter to:
John PM.B. #200
221 E, Market
Iowa City, IA, 52245
4 NORTHWESTERN tickets for sale. If
interested please call Matt at 214-5706.

BUY/SELL all Penn State vs. U
football tickets at 517-351-1992
www.jamestheticketman.com. All
credit cards accepted. 734-260-6760.

of M
or
Major

Acapulco
Jamaica.
Bahamas
Florida
Europe
Conact STA Tei
Michigan Union Ground floor
323-937.1150
A S52 South Stott St.
T 734-769-2555

Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 Days . Most Meals . Free Parties. -Includes Taxes
Jamaica $439
7 Nights - Air & Hotel.- Save $150 on Food & Drinks
Cancun $399
7 Nights . Air & Hotel - Free Food & 30 Hours of Drinks
springbreaktravel.com - Our 14th Year!
1-800-678-6386
GO DIRECT=Savings! #1 Internet-based
company offering wholesale Spring Break
packages (no middlemen)! Zero traveler
complaints last year! 1-800-367-1252
www.springbreakdirect.com
OpebSeats.com. For UM football,
basketball, and bowlgame tickets. Buy or
sell your tickets on openseats.com. It's fans
helping fans online-and it works!
NOBODY DOES BREAKS BETTER!
Fob 24-Mar 31, 2001
Panama City FL:

t

TRAVEL
SERVICES
1-800-648-4849
www.ststrovel.com

On Campu ftoMa
Nic Bogo. r734)2221017
Eic Duboys (734)222.0528
Rcl Glman (734)222-0981

1p'i4 br'&k
Panama City Beach
Florida
from $99 per person
Sandpiper Beacon beach
resort the "fun place"!
Home of the world's
on gest keg party!
Drinkdraft beer all week
long e Tiki beach bar .

SELLING: 3 U of M football tix @
Northwestern Nov 4. Call 213-6555 ext. 893.
SPRING BREAK 2001
Acapulco, Cancun, San Juan. Get a group,
you could go free!! Call Francis at Regency
Travel, A2, 734-665-6122. Check for our low
air fares to everywhere.
3 PEOPLE seek 4th for roommate in 4
bdrm. hse. Large room, great loc! $375/mo.
incl. utils. 747-8339. Ask for Barbara.
ROOMMATE needed to share 2 bdrm. apt.
Close to campus and downtown. $399/mo. +
elec. & phone. Avail. now-Aug. 332-7841.

O CHARLIES ANGELS (PG-13)
11:30,12:10,1:10,1:50,2:30,3:20,
3:50, 4:40, 5:30, 5:50, 6:45, 7:30, 7:50,
9:00, 9:35, 10:00
FRI/SAT LS 11:30,12:05
O LEGEND OF BAGGER VANCE (PG-13)
FRI 11:40,1:45,2:15,4:15,4:50,7:00,
7:20, 9:30, 9:45
SAT/SUN 1110,11:40,1:45,2:15,
4:15,4:50, 7:00, 7:20, 9:30, 9:45
FRI/SAT LS 11:50, 12:00
0 LUCKY NUMBERS (R)
11:45, 12:30, 2:00, 3:00, 4:10, 5:10,
7:10, 7:35, 9:25, 9:50
FRI/SAT LS 11:55
F BOOK OF SHADOWS: BLAIR WITCH
2 (R) FRI 12:20, 1:20, 2:20, 3:25, 4:20,
5:20, 6:55, 7:25, 9:05, 9:30
SAT/SUN 11:20,12:20, 1:20, 2:20,
3:25, 4:20, 5:20, 6:55, 7:25, 9:05, 9:30
"FRI/SAT LS 11:05
O THE LITTLE VAMPIRE (PG)
FRI 1:00, 3:05, 5:00, 6:55, 8:50
SAT/SUN 11:05, 1:00, 3:05,5:00, f:55,
8:50
LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER (R)
12:35, 2:55, 5:15, 7:30, 9:55
FRI/SAT LS 11:50
PAY IT FORWARD (PG-13)
12:00, 2:25, 5:00, 7:25, 9:45
FRI/SAT LS 12:00
LADIES MAN (R) FRI/SAT LS 11:35
DR T. AND THE WOMEN (R)
FRI/SAT LS 11:25
BEST IN SHOW (R)
11:35, 2:00, 4:25, 6:40, 9:10
FRI/SAT LS 11:15
THE CONTENDER (R)
11:30, 2:05, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40
LOST SOULS (R)
FRI/SAT LS 11:00
MEET THE PARENTS (PG-13)
12:15, 2:35, 4:45, 7:05, 9:20
FRI/SA LS 11:35
REMEMER THE TITANS (PG)
11:50, 2:10, 4:35, 7:15, 9:40

h PadreTX ~ 7food & entertain,,
____________ _ ,: 5]

i

y

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan