100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 27, 2000 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 27, 2000

NATION/WORLD

YANKEES
Continued from Page 1
At the stroke of midnight, Piazza flied out to the edge of the
warning track in center field with a runner on base to finish it.
The Yankees fans in the sellout crowd of 55,292 went
wild after having been outshouted all evening.
Unlike the overmatched San Diego Padres in 1998 and
the overwhelmed Atlanta Braves in 1999, the wild-card
Mets were in it all the way. Their best chance, however,
really may have ended when closer Armando Benitez could
not hold a one-run lead in the opener.
These Yankees went into the playoffs with seven straight
losses, and also dropped the opener in their AL series against
Oakland and Seattle. In the end, though, manager Joe Torre's
team showed what October experience is all about.
Even with so much at stake, there was room to have a lit-
tle fun - with a broken bat, no less. Kurt Abbott shattered
his bat on a foul ball in the Mets fourth, and the jagged barrel
skittered out toward Jeter at shortstop.
With the crowd starting to hoot, mindful of the Clemens-
Piazza encounter in Game 2, jeter made a nice show in
defusing any hint of trouble. He fielded the broken piece
with his glove, laughed and handed it to a Mets batboy.
On the Mets bench, Piazza chuckled. But in the Yankees
dugout, Clemens just stared straight ahead as the crowd
chanted "Rah-ger, Rah-ger."
Had it gone to Game 6, Clemens would have started
tomorrow night at Yankee Stadium.

While Jeter and Williams hit the solo homers for the Yan-
kees, the Mets scraped out two runs that left it tied at 2
through the seventh.
Williams put the Yankees ahead 1-0 when he homered
leading off the second. The cleanup man had been 0-for-15
through four games and hitless in his last 22 Series at-bats
overall.
Trying to ensure that the skid was behind him, he singled
and walked his next two times up.
Jeter, who homered on the first pitch of the game the pre-
vious night, made it 2-all by hitting a shot into the Yankees'
left-field bullpen in the sixth off Leiter.
The Mets had to work much harder for their runs.
Bubba Trammell, starting because of his career success
against Pettitte, walked with one out in the second and Pay-
ton singled. The runners moved up on a groundout and
Leiter, an .053 hitter this season, dragged a perfect bunt past
the mound.
First baseman Tino Martinez bobbled the ball for a
moment and made an underhanded flip to Pettitte, but the
pitcher dropped the throw. Pettitte was charged with an
error - denying an RBI to Leiter, who had none this year
- but a run scored and the Mets were satisfied.
Benny Agbayani followed with a slow roller that third
baseman Brosius tried to play with his bare hand, but the
ball escaped his grasp and went for an RBI single that gave
the Mets a 2-1 lead.
Pettitte helped himself with his second pickoff of the
Series, trapping a wandering Abbott off first in the fourth.

I II

% Off
Sale
October 3o-November 3

THE MICHIGAN
DAILY.
ARTHUR MILLER
WROTE FOR US.
You SHOULD T OO.

MILLER
Continued from Page 1
economy, politics and society. It's
mixed up with the way we live," Miller
said.
Audience members were then
allowed to ask Miller questions,
although only a few were able to do
so.
One man called Miller "an
a authentic American hero," and then
asked how Miller found the courage
to stand up to the McCarthy hear-
ings.
Miller was called before the
House Committee on Un-American
Activities and was found guilty of
contempt.
But the decision was reversed a year
later.
Miller responded to the question
by saying he was self-employed and
as a result was not at risk of losing
a job.
Miller added that he was "a con-
firmed anti-fascist. I felt the world
could go under if we had a dictator-
ship."
When asked what advice he had
for aspiring playwrights, Miller said
"the theater only needs love and
attention, and I would not discour-
age people from writing. The more
stuff that's put out,. the more pres-
sure is put on to produce. It would
be a shame if this great civilization
killed off one of the most vital parts
of itself."
Art and Design sophomore Ollie
Uberti said even without Miller's
physical presence at Rackham, he
enjoyed the event.
"Seeing him on a big screen really
set him apart and made it all the more
special" Uberti said.
The symposium will continue today
and tomorrow with a number of videos
and discussions.
Events today include "Miller's
Recent Work for the Stage" at Rack-
ham Amphitheater at 10:30 a.m. and
"Miller and Autobiography" at the
Rackham West Conference Room
beginning at 3 p.m.
Mel Gussow of the New York
Times will deliver an address at
10:30 Saturday morning at Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
All events will be broadcast live
on Channel 22.
For a complete listing of events
visit -wit-. Unich. edu/pres/arhur-
i//fller.

ACOSScTHE NATION
Retiree testifies against Firestone
DECATUR, Ill. - A retired tire maker testified yesterday that while Bridge-
stone/Firestone Inc. managers preached quality, they frowned on workers who
did not quickly move tires down the assembly line.
Lonnie Dart, one of four former workers deposed by lawyers suing Bridge-
stone/Firestone, said quantity was the priority during his 32 years working vari-
ous jobs inside the Decatur plant. "They preached quality, but if you didn't m
the numbers, you was in trouble," Dart said.
Dart's testimony was somewhat tempered by other former workers who said
tires ran a gauntlet of quality control checks and inspections before being
deemed roadworthy.
All four ex-workers offered tidbits that the plaintiffs' attorney, Bruce Kaster,
said helped him establish problems in every stage of the production process it
the company's tire plants.
"More of the same," said Kaster, who was questioning witnesses on behalf pf
plaintiffs in a handful of personal injury and wrongful death cases tied to
allegedly faulty tires.
Jan Wagoner Sr., like Dart, recalled that there were quotas, saying repair work-
ers were reprimanded for not keeping up.
Wagoner said he complained to managers about changes in procedures that
called for him to poke an awl completely through the sidewall of new tires.

Crime, weapons in
schools diminish
WASHINGTON - Attorney Gen-
eral Janet Reno said yesterday that the
crime rate in schools continued to
drop last year - mirroring the drop in
the nation's crime rate - but empha-
sized that considerable work remains
to be done to make schools across the
country safer,
The third Annual Report on School
Safety found that the percentage of
high school students who reported
carrying a weapon to school declined
to 7 percent last year from 12 percent
in 1993. Reno said in response to
questions that the 7 percent rate -
roughly one in 14 students - is still
too high and that no one in law
enforcement or education should be
satisfied until students feel safer.
The attorney general said high-pro-
file shootings at some schools, and
recent incidents, including one this.
week in which a student brandished a
gun in school, contribute to the feel-
ing of uneasiness among many Amer-
icans.

"I think if you have seen some of
the tragedies that have been reported
they strike so close to home. You
think, 'Could it be my son's school?",
Reno said.
Experiment yields1g
Parkinson's relief
WASHINGTON - A gene ther-
apy experiment relieved severe
symptoms of Parkinson's disease
in monkeys and experts say;the
technique offers promise for treat-
ing the 1.2 million Americans who
suffer from the disease, experts
say.
A virus that had been join
with a gene that prompts produ;
tion of dopamine, a chemical neu-
rotransmitter, was injected into the
brains of monkeys who had chemi-
cally induced Parkinson's disease.
Three monkeys that had severe
symptoms of Parkinson's were
restored to near normal by the gene
therapy, said Jeffrey Kordow e-
first author of a study appearing
today in the journal Science. 6

Used Office Furniture:
* Desks " Chairs * Files
* Tables * Bookcases

-TAnn Aroor
Student Guide

Mon:
Noon-S:5Spna
Tues.-Thurs:
Noon-3:SSpm
Fri:
7:30am-Il:3Oam

--..

0.
C
0a
1..

L.

Plymouth Rd.

iw -

N
Baxter

WWt.AASTUDENTGUIDE.COM
W W W. A A F LIX. O M
W A P. A A FL I X. C 0 M
diamondbullet.com
USAS1i T FIRST
$18!! CAP AND GOWN
at GRADWEAR.COM
NO TAX!
U. of Michigan $35 plus tax
Same Quality, Better Price
Money Back Guaranteed

AROUND THE WORLD

C-I
/T',:

764-2470

No coupons accepted with this sale. Sale excludes $1 items.
Only applies to merchandise at PD warehouse.

ONo sCssor Tuosday discounts]

Note confirms men
survived explosion
MURMANSK, Russia - Huddled
in a destroyed submarine on the sea
floor, a Russian sailor wrote a terse
account of how he and 22 comrades
tried in vain to escape, then scrawled a
last message to his family, Russian
naval officials said yesterday.
The note was found in the pocket of
Lt. Dmitry Kolesnikov, whose body
was one of the first to be recovered
from the nuclear submarine Kursk
that sank Aug. 12 with 118 men
aboard. The message was the first
firm evidence that any of the crew ini-
tially survived explosions that shat-
tered the submarine..
Written a few hours after the sub
plunged to the bottom of the Barents
Sea, the note tells a horrifying story in
eerily straightforward sentences.
"All the crew from the sixth, sev-
enth and eighth compartments went
over to the ninth. There are 23 people
here. We made this decision as a
result of the accident," Russian navy

Kuroyedov said.

chief Adm. Vladimir Kuroyedov quoted
the note as saying. "None of us can.get
to the surface,"the message continued.
Kolesnikov's handwriting in the first
part of the note was neat but scrawl
after emergency lights went ou,

Gbagbo sworn in;
ethnic battles erupt
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - Long-
time opposition leader Laurent Gbag-
bo was sworn in as preside
yesterday at the heavily guarded pre6
dential palace, as political officials
appealed for an end to the violence-
that has wracked Abidjan and other-
cities in this West African nation.
"I feel in this moment the renais
sance of the Ivory Coast, the birth of a
modern, prosperous, democratic and
united nation," said Gbagbo, who was
swept to power Wednesday in a popu-
lar uprising that forced junta leadei 1
Gen. Robert Guei to flee.
- Compiledfiom Daily wire reports.

:

UALL MATINLES !
ISATURDAY &. SUNDAY 10&.11 AM
STUART LITTLE (PG)

O LUCKY NUMBERS (R)
12:30, 1:00, 2:45, 3:15, 5:00, 5:30,
7:15, 7:45, 9:30, 10:00
FRI/SAT LS 11:30, 12:00
0 BOOK OF SHADOWS: BLAIR WITCH
2 (R) FRI 12:05, 1:00, 2:00, 2:50, 3:50,
4:45, 5:40, 6:45, 7:30, 9:00, 9:30
SAT/SUN 11:00, 12:05,1:00, 2:00,
2:50, 3:50, 4:45, 5:40, 6:45, 7:30, 9:00,
9:30 FRI/SAT LS 11:00, 11:30
o THE LITTLE VAMPIRE (PG)
FRI 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:05, 8:55
SAT/SUN 11:15, 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:05,
8:55 FRI/SAT LS 10:45
o LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER (R)
12:35, 2:55, 5:15, 7:25, 9:45
FRI/SAT LS 11:40
O PAY IT FORWARD (PG-13)
FRI 11:35,1:40,2:15,4:15,4:50, 7:00,
7:30, 9:30, 10:00
SAT/SUN 11:05,11:45,1:40,2:15,
4:15,4:50, 7:00,7:35, 9:50, 10:00
LADIES MAN (R)
12:45, 3:00, 5:05, 7:10, 9:20
FRI/SAT LS 11:05
DR T. AND THE WOMEN (R)
11:45, 2:10, 7:10, 9:45
FRI/SAT LS 12:00
BEST IN SHOW (R)
11:50,2:10,4.20,6:40, 9:05
FRI/SAT LS 11:15
THE CONTENDER (R)
11:30, 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:55
LOST SOULS (R)
11:55, 1:55, 3:55, 6:35, 9:25
FRI/SAT LS 11:35
MEET THE PARENTS (PG-13)
12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40
FRI/SAT LS 11:50
WINDING ROADS (NR)
12:00, 4:30
REMEMBER THE TITANS (PG)
12:10, 2:25, 4:35, 6:55, 9:10
FRI/SAT LS 11:10
EXORCIST (R)
1:50, 6:40, 9:25 FRI/SAT LS 11:55

The M chgan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during thefall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term. starting in September. via U.S. mail are
$100. Winter term (January through April) is $105, yearlong (September through April) is $180. On-campus
subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily. 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor. Michigan 48109-1327. a
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 734): News 76-DAILY: Arts 763-0379: Sports 647-3336: Opinion 764-0552:
Circulation 764-0558: Classified advertising 764-0557: Display advertising 764-0554: Billing 764-0550.
E-mail letters to the editor to dadly.letters@umich.edu. World Wide Web: www.mrichigandaly.com.

I

I EDTOIA.SAF ikeSahEdtr nChe

NEWS Jewel Gopwani, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Nick Bunkley, Michael Grass, Nika Schulte, Jaimie Winkler
STAFF: Lindsey Alpert. Kristen Beaumont. Anna Clark. Laura Deneau. Lizze Ehrie. Whitney Elliot. David Enders. Jen Fish. Robert Gold.
Krsta Gullo. Rachel Green. Lisa Hoffman. Elizabeth Kassab. Jodie Kaufman.. Yael Konen. Lisa Koivu. lane Kruli. Hanna LoPatn. Susan Luth.
Jacquelyn Nixon. Caitin Nish. Jeremy W. Peters, Natalie Plosky. James Restivo. Karen Schwartz. Tara D. Sharma. Maria Sprow.
Camre Thorson. Johanna Wetmore.
CALENDAR: Lindsey Apert: GRAPHICS: Scott Gordon
EDITORIAL Emily Achenbaum, Managing Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Peter Cunniffe, Ryan DePietro, Josh Wickerham, Nicholas Woomer
STAFF: Dane Barnes. Ryan Blay. Kevin Clune. Chip Cullen. Sumon Dantiki. Seth Fisher. Lea Frost. Rob Goodspeed. Jessica Guerin.
Aubrey Henretty. Henry Hyatt. Patrick Kley. Cortney Konner. Chris Kula. Thomas Kulurgis. Christine Lambert. Erin McQuinn. Del
Mendez. Manish Raili Branden Sanz. Rachael Smith. Waj Syed. Katie Tibaldi.
SPORTS David Den Herder, Managing Editor
SENIOR EDITORS: Chris Duprey, Mark Prancescutti, Geoff Gagnon, Stephanie Offen
NiGHT E.DiTORS Raphael Goodstein. Arun Gopal. Michaci Kern Ryan C. Moloney. Jon Schwartz. Dan Williams.
STAFF Roit Bhave. Michael Bloom. Chris Burke. Kareem Copeland. Sam Duwe. Kristen Fidh. Rnonda Gilmer. Richard Haddad. David
Horn. Steve Jackson. Nick Kacher. Shawn Kemp. Albert Kim. Nathan Linsley. Peter Lund. James Mercier. David Mosse. Jeff Phillips. David
Roth. Naveed Sikora. Beniamin Singer. Jeb Singer. Joe Smith
ARTS Gabe Fajuri, Chris Kula, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITOR: en Goldstein
WEEKEND, ETC. EDITORS: Jenni Glenn, Elizabeth fentIer
SUB EDITORS Mat aietl 'Filmi. Robyn Metaned ifine/Pe forming Arts. Gina Hamadey iBooks. Jennifer Fogel ITV/New Medial. John Uhl iMusicI.
STAFF: Gautam Baks. Ryan Blay. Lese Boxer. Rob Brode. Jet Chang. Christopher Cousino. Katie Den Bleyker. Rick Derns. Jeff Dickerson. K ran
Divvela. Melissa Gollob. Joshua Gross. Lyle Henretty. Crstian Hoard. Elena .ipson. Jenny Jeites. Matt Manser. W. JacaI Melton. Shannon
o Sullivan. Lisa Ralt. Darren Ringel. Jim Schiff. Jacquelene Smith. Luke Smith.
PHOTO Louis Brown, Jossica Johnson, Ed
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: David Katz, Marjorie Marshall
ARTS EDITOR: Peter Cornue
STAFF: Peter Comue. Rachel Feierman. Justin Fitzpatrick. Sam Hollenshead. Jeff Hurvitz. Michael Hynes. Joyce Lee. Carrie McGee. Danny
Moloshok. Norman Ng. Brendan O'Donnell, Joanna Paine. Brad Quinn. Abby Rosenbaum. Brandon Sedlaff. Ellie White, Alex Wolk. Alyssa Wood.
ONLINE Rachel Berger, Paul Wong, ManagingEd S
STAFF: Kiran Divvela. Dana M Goldberg, Sammy Ko. Mark McKinstry Vince sust.
CONSULTANT ,Satadru Pramani

' BUINES SAFFMarkJ. homord Busnes Maage

E31

P

F--.... W.W* - L I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan