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October 25, 2000 - Image 12

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-10-25

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12 The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 25, 2000

HORN
Continued from Page 10
didn't put too much stock in the lat-
est talk coming out of Columbus.
"Young people are young people
and sometimes they say things the
way they want them said, and some-
times they are misinterpreted along
the way," Tiller said.
He was referring to an Associated
Press report yesterday that quoted
Ohio State captain Joe Cooper chal-
Ienging Drew Brees.
"No matter what (Brees) does in
the game, we want to make him feel

it," Cooper told the AP. "Anything
that's legal, we're going to hit him."
"I don't think he. likes getting hit
as hard as we hit people," Cooper
said.
Tiller tried to downplay the com-
ments. "I really don't know what he
said,"'Tiller said. "Nor is it relevant
to the game."
Yesterday, Ohio State coach John
Cooper had nothing but good things
to say about the Purdue signal caller.
"Drew Brees in my opinion is the
best quarterback in college football
and has a really good chance to win
the Heisman," he said.

Not all penalties 'bad,'.
hockey players claim

JEFF HURVITZ/Ooiiy
Michigan captain Geoff Koch has been doing a lot of pleading with refs this
season to keep his teammates out of the penalty box. But as several Wolverines
have pointed out, not all trips to the "sin bin" are necessarily bad.

By Arun Gopal
Dailv Sports Writer
The linesman raises his arm and
puts his whistle in his mouth.
Instantly, everyone in the arena
knows what's coming - a penalty.
The offending team finally gets
control of the puck, and with a shrill
"TWEET!" play is stopped.
Someone is headed to the penalty
box for 2, 4, 5 or - if the infraction
is particularly serious - ten min-
utes.
Go to a hockev game, and a fan is
sure to see this scene repeated at
least a dozen times. Penalties can
instantly change the momentum of a
rgame - a team can be ahead by two
goals, get hit with a double-minor
penalty, and before the squad knows
what has happened, the score can be
tied.
So far this season, penalties
and, as a result, special teams -
have played a major role for the
Michigan hockey team. Time and
again, the Wolverines have found
themselves either shorthanded or
with a man-advantage, and the
results have sometimes been drastic
- witness Michigan's 5-5 tie in the
Ice Breaker Tournament against
North Dakota, when eight of the
game's 10 goals were scored with
one team on the power play.
Since penalties can have such a
negative impact on the offending
team, one might think that there is no
such thing as a "good" penalty. But,
as Michigan senior defenseman -
and team penalty minutes leader -
Dave Huntzicker points out, this is
not necessarily true.
"You don't want to give up a good
scoring opportunity," Huntzicker
said. "If you have to take a penalty,
sometimes you have to take a penal-
tv. If they've got a breakaway, and

Player
Dave Huntzicker
Jay Vancik
Andy Burnes
Jeff Jillson
Mike Komisarek
Scott Matzka

Pen.
6
7
5
5
4
4

Min.
20
14
10
10
8
8

First in fight
The Michigan hockey team has
taken its share of penalties - good
and bad - this season. But a few
Wolverines have spent more time in.
the box than others.
Here are Michigan's penalty minute
leaders through 6 games:

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you get a good piece of the guy and
he doesn't get a good play off, then
that's probably a good penalty."
Another Wolverine defenseman
who has spent his fair share of time
in the penalty box is senior Bob
Gassoff. Fans may recall Gassoff's
role in the infamous brawi a
Michigan State at midseason last
year - Gassoff was subsequently
suspended and forced to miss two
games.
Gassoff found himself in a similar
situation two seasons ago during a
lopsided home playoff win over
Bowling Green, when he jumped off
of the bench to confront a Bowling
Green player who was arguing with
the Wolverines' Bobby Haves.
But the incidents against Michigan
State and Bowling Green were situa-
tions where Gassoff was defending a
teammate.
In the unwritten rules of hockey,
any punishment received while
standing up for a teammate falls
under the category of a "good"
penalty and is therefore, in most
cases, excusable.
"There comes a point where you
have to stick up for your teammates*
in certain situations," Gassoff said,
"It's unfortunate, in a way, that col-
lege hockey punishes people when
they do stuff like that.
"But, if a situation comes up like
Michigan State last year with
Swistak or the Bobby Hayes situa-
tion with Bowling Green. I don't
think twice. That's the role some
guys have to take on the team.
Don't be fooled there are "bad"
penalties.
For the unfortunate player who
commits such an infraction - any
penalty in the offensive zone would
qualify -- the skate 'o the "sin bin"
can be long and lonely, and the time
in the box can be even worse.
"If it was a bad penalty, you hope
to hell that the other team doesn't
score, because it may be your last
shift," Gassoff said. "When you stick*
up for your teammates and you know
you're not going to get harped on
when you get back to the bench, it's
a great feeling.
"But when you know you've taken
a bad penalty, it's the worst two min-
utes of your life."

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