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October 17, 2000 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-10-17

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12 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 17, 2000

Caughlan runs final home race

Extra crowd benefits
sluggish 'M' women

By Steve Jackson
For the Daily
Senior Tom Caughlan said goodbye
to the Michigan golf course Sunday at
the Wolverine Interregional.
After a week of hard preparation
and Sunday's meet, Caughlan had
seen more than enough of that course,
"I'm not going to miss this course at
all," Caughlan said immediately after
the race. "It's really tough ... these
teams came here to prepare for the
tough courses ahead, like at
Nationals."
Although Caughlan may not hold
the course close to his heart, the Iowa
native has really come to appreciate

competing for Michigan.
"Mv last home meet ... now that is
something really special," Caughlan
said. "Running in blue has been a
really great experience. It just doesn't
feel like four years have gone by."
Caughlan was the third Michigan
finisher (30th overall) on Sunday with
a time of 26:06.
He ran 26 seconds faster than his
time on the same course at the
Wolverine Invitational in early
September. This was the first time this
season that Cauglan finished in the
Michigan's top five.
"I feel like an old man," Caughlan
said after the race. "I'm the oldest guy,
maybe the most mature, and that does-

n't say much for our team in terms of
maturity. All the young guys are great,
they don't give me and Nate
(Hoffman) any grief for being 'the old
guys.'"
Fellow senior Nate Hoffman red-
shirted his freshman year and he plans
on returning to run again next fall.
Even though he said the team "got
waxed" this weekend, Caughlan is
looking forward to the rest of the sea-
son.
"We have some big races coming
up," Caughlan said. "We have one
more week of hard practice before we
prepare for the Big Tens. And then it
will be District time in just two more
weeks."

By Jeff Phillips
D)aily Sports Writer
Last weekend, the Michigan -
women's soccer team once again fell
victim to sluggish starts, something that
has plagued the team all year .
The Wolveines fell behind 2-0 iii'-'
tially to No. 6 Penn State before they
notched a goal and nearly cappcd off
the comeback.
Michigan again needcd to come from
behind against last place Ohio State,
after the Buckeyes drew first blood.
The Wolverines. finally scored 10
minutes into the second half after;press-
ing the Ohio State defense the entire
game.
Ohio State was basically bunking
in," Michigan assistant coach Scott
Forrester said.
After about 20 minutes of light
attacking, a unique situation was creat-
ed.
For the first time all year, the
Michigan men's soccer team was given
the opportunity to play on the Michigan
Soccer Field following the women's

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Stephanie Chavez and the women's
soccer team got a boost from the
men's fans in their win over Ohio State.

~_... 1

game, and fans arrived early. In addi-
tion to the fans that remained from the
women's game, the crowd was now the
loudest and largest home crowd all sea-
son.
"Any time you have this kind of an
atmosphere and get people in the stands
it is a lot of fun to play in," Michigan
coach Debbie Belkin Rademacher said.
Added to the already explosive
crowd were blue horns, which were
brought to the men's game for Steve
Burns, who liked the additional noise
that the horns brought. The crowd
erupted and the women's squad
responded by scoring two spectacular
goals.
Kacy Beitel, who scored one goal
and assisted on another, was influenced
by the crowd.
"I love it when the crowd is loud,"
Beitel said. "I can hear them and it gets
me excited."
The crowd could help the
Wolverine's push for an NCAA tourna-
ment berth as their next three games are
home, including a showdown with No.
1 Notre Dame.
WOLVERINES
Continued from Page 10
the running game. That was th
Wolverines downfall in last season's loss
- they finished the game with only six
rushing yards.
The Wolverines already have as many
rushing yards this season as they did all
of last year. And Anthony Thomas is
currently ranked seventh in the nation in
running.
But he will be up against some stiff
competition in Michigan State's T.J.
Duckett this Saturday.
"Duckett reminds me of Ron Dayne,"
Foote said. "But he can move better lat-
erally than Dayne."
But with everything that was talked
about or at least asked yesterday, one
item barely came up. Michigan State's
0-3 record in conference play.
Everyone knows that doesn't matter
this weekend.
"You throw out all the records," offen-
sive lineman Maurice Williams said. "Its
who wants to win mst."
DUPREY
Continued from Page 10
For all those who want someday to
see a football player dive under center
and intercept a quarterback trying to
spike the ball, Saturday's clash offered
something close. SAE's Marcus Badger,
with the game winding down, penetrat-
ed the Delta Sig backfield on a blitz and
actually intercepted the shotgun snap.
Football aside, Mud Bowl 2000 did-
n't do much for interfraternity goodwill.
Because of the physical nature of the
blocking and tackling - despite the
official rule of the game being "two-
hand touch"- unpleasantries arose
between the sides.
On three separate occasions, punches
were thrown and the officials - clearly
hired from professional boxing, or per-
haps, CCHA hockey - did nothing to
discourage the fisticuffs. They let the
players go after each other until the
benches cleared and peace finally pre-
vailed.
In that way, this year's Mud Bowl had
a little bit of everything - some good
football; a messy stage that would have
made Double Dare proud; and two
teams that hated each other enough to
make things entertaining.
An enjoyable afternoon, to say the
least.
- Chris Dupre' ca be reachled at
cduprevyaumnickeduW

New York blanks St Louis
and heads to World Series
NEW YORK (AP) - Mike Hampton
did what he was brought to New York to
do: Pitch the Mets into the World Series
- and a possible subway one at that.
Hampton pitched a three-hitter and
the Mets started their clinching party
early with a three-run first inning
Monday night as they beat the St. Louis
Cardinals 7-0 and won the NL champi-
onship series 4-l.
The game got testy at the end when
Dave Veres hit Jay Payton in the helmet
with a 1-2 pitch with two outs in the
eighth inning.
Payton, bleeding over l' left eve,
charged the mound and the dugouts and'
bullpens emptied as police in riot gear
lined the field.
That was the only thing that could
dampen this night for the Mets. New
York won its fourth NL pennant and first
since 1986, joining the 1997 Florida
Marlins as the only wild card teams to
--- ,. , r.~ I~ .J a.

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