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October 16, 2000 - Image 14

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-10-16

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4B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - October 16, 2000

GAME STATISTICS

Team Stats
First Downs
Rushes/Yards
Passing Yards
Offensive Plays
Total Offense
Return Yards
Comp/Att/Int
Punts/Avg
Fumbles/Lost
Penalties/Yards
Time of Poss

IND
15
33/85
101
63
186
112
14/30/1
9/30 9
3/2
4/32
28:41

MICH
26
52/282
280
74
562
94
17/22/0
1/67,0
2/1
6/45
31:19

I N 0 A NA

Cameron's program left behind
Tiller, Turner, Mason all miles ahead of Indiana football

PASSING
Player
Randle El
Jones
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Randle Ea
L. Wiliams
Lewis
Jones
Myles
J. Johnson
Hogan
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Gaddis
Lewis
Dorsey
Brandt
Dielman
Graham
L. Williams
Myles
Totals

C-A
13-27
1-3
14-30

A"t
11
7
7
1
2
2
1
33
No.
5
2
1
14

PUNTING
PlayerI
Hamre
Payne
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Carter 5
Graham 3
Totals 8
PUNT RETURNS
Player No.
none
Totals O
DEFENSE
Player
Wallace
J. Smith
Anderson
Schaffer
Fowler
Stone
Rasmussen
Frink
Genord
Floyd
Rodgers
Barnett
Gonzalez
Anthony
Goodman
Moat
Brown
Mandina
S. Williams
Frost
J Johnson
Myles
Spencer
Young
PASS DEFENSE
Player Int

Yds
39
30
16
9
9
8
3
85
Yds
77
13
12
8
4
-1
-2
-10
101
No.
6
1
9
Yds
74
38
112
Yds
0
Solo
7
7
5
5
4
3
3
3
3
3
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
Yds
O
O
0

Yds
111
-10
101
Avg
3.5
4.3
2.3
9.0
4.5
4.0
3.0
2.6
Avg
15.4
6.5
12.0
8.0
4.0
-1.0
-1.0
-10.0
7.2
Yds
246
32
278
Avg
14.8
12.7
14.0

TD
0
0
O
Lg
20
14
6
9
6
6
3
20
Lg
17
8
12
8
4
0
0
0
17
Avg
41.0
32.0
30.9
Lg
27
21
27

int
1
0
TD
O
O
0
0
0
O
0
O
TD
0
0
O
0
0
0
0
0
0
Lg
51
32
51
TO
0
O
0

By Chris Duprey
Daily Sports Editor
The look of the losing coach
coming out of the lockerroom after
the game is sobering. Hair mussed,
drained of energy, seemingly in
immediate need of intravenous flu-
ids, the losing coach is quite simply
a beaten man.
Barry Alvarez played that part
after Wisconsin lost a late lead to
Michigan on Sept. 30. That defeat
dropped the Badgers to 0-2 in the
conference, unthinkable for what
had been a preseason top-10 team.
Alvarez was the picture of a man
who had failed to live up to expec-
tations of his team. The picture
painted by Indiana coach Cam
Cameron on Saturday after the 58-
point defeat was in stark contrast --
a man who has failed to establish
program expectations in his four
years on the job.
"There's only one guy that's total-
ly accountable for that kind of per-
formance - and that's the guy
you're looking at," Cameron said
quietly.
Cameron knew there would be
bumps and bruises along the way
when he assumed control of the pro-
gram before the 1997 season.
Indiana is the losingest football
program in Big Ten history. No
coach has departed Bloomington
with a winning record since Bo
McMillin in '47.

"There are places that are tougher
to win at than Indiana," Cameron
said. "Nowhere in my contract did it
say this was going to be easy."
The weight of expectations stem
from the success of his Big Ten
brethren. At the same time Indiana
introduced Cameron, Purdue
brought in Joe Tiller, Minnesota
made the move to Glen Mason and
Illinois did the same with Ron
Turner.
They were the class of '97. And
given how their programs had per-
formed prior to their arrival, no one
was taking any bets on who was
Most Likely To Succeed.
Bit by bit, three of those coaches
have raised the standards within
their program. Tiller's five-wide
offense has flourished in West
Lafayette; Minnesota won eight
games last season and appeared in a
bowl, as did Illinois.
More evidence: Purdue and
Minnesota are currently tied for the
Big Ten lead, achieving that posi-
tion after crucial road victories this
weekend.
Cameron's program, meanwhile,
has been stagnant. His 12-27 record
at Indiana includes 4-7 seasons in
each of the past two years.
lie appears to be headed for
another subpar year. Indiana has
just two victories this season, and
picking up another two will be a
stretch, given that Cameron himself
said that the Hoosiers "can't beat

Bo McMillin
Clyde Smith
Bernie Crimmins
Bob Hicks
Phil Dickens
John Pont
Lee Corso
Sam Wyche

6348-11
8-27-1
13-32
1-8
2041-2
31-51-1
41-68.2
3-8

Avg Lg TD
0.0 0 0

Candid Cam
Former Michigan assistant Cam Cameron
is finding life at Indiana tougher that life in
Ann Arbor. Here's how his predecessors
did.

Asst
2
1
3
1
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
'1

Tot
9
8
E3
6
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
'2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1

Rasmussen
Wallace
Totals

.
0
0

Lg
O
O
0

Brk-up
2

Td
0
0
0

M I C H I G A N

PASSING
Player
Totals
RUSHING
Player
I{ eard
Perry
Cross
H itnsort
Motindros
Askew
M jnery
Navarre
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Terrell
Walker
Seymour
Cross
Joppru
Bellamy
Rosel
Askew
Totals

C-A
14 3
17-22

Yds TO
2:3, 2
. ? 0
280 2

Art
1S
10
1}
10
2
4
1
3
52
No,
6
2
2
2
2
17
17

Yds
95
68
45
30
19
14
6
4
1
282
Yds
101
90
28
25
3
18
11
4
280

Avg
6.3
68
90
3.O
9.
3.5
6.0
1.3
0.5
5.4
Avg
16.8
45.0
14.0
12.5
1.5
18.0
11.0
4.0
16.4

L
22
17
15
4
6
3
1
22
Lg
43
75
19
20
10
18
i1
4
75

Int
0
0
0
TO
3
0
U
0
0
0
0
0
4
TD
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

anybody playing like" they did
against Michigan.
In each season, Indiana has fallen
victim to a catastrophic defeat. Last
season's was a 59-0 loss at
Wisconsin.
But even that game wasn't as self-
destructive as Saturday's, where the
Hoosiers gave away possessions on
fumbles, interceptions, blocked
punts and downs.
Cameron is bearing the losing-
coach look more often than a for-
mer Michigan assistant is accus-
tomed to.
More and more, his program
befuddles him. Progress is harder to
chart, faith harder to keep.
"This is my fourth year here and it
seems like (losing) is getting routine,"
defensive end Kemp Rasmussen said.
That's exactly what Cameron
should be afraid of.
HOOSI ERS
Continued from Page 1B
Tack on two more for prosperity,
and the Wolverines led 38-0 with
2:19 to go in the half.
"There was good intensity right
from the beginning," Michigan coach
Lloyd Carr said. "We still have to
prove a lot of things."
And perhaps there was no conclu-
sive proof, but there was certainly
evidence of something different with
the Wolverines in those last two min-
utes of the half.
Having already amassed the most
points in a quarter this season, the
Wolverines of an earlier era (possibly
last week) might have chosen to burn
the clock down to halftime.
Saturday, things were different.
After receiving a punt at the
Indiana 43-Yard line, Drew Henson
took the field, rolled out, and gave
the bomb to David Terrell. One play.
Seven points. Eight seconds.
"We finished the game today,"
Carr said. "We've got to prove that
we're a consistent football team."
The Wolverines were able to con-
tain Randle ELI in the second half's
opening drive, forcing the Hoosiers
to go three and out. Michigan picked
up the ball and composed a 64-yard
touchdown drive that put the
Wolvernes up 52-0.
"Randle El is a guy nobody is
going to stop, " Carr said. "What we
wanted to do was force him to.
throw.,
But once Michigan had reached
the 50s, it really didn't matter. John
Navarre took control of the offense,
and mental dejection on the Indiana
sideline seemed to be working as a
second defense.
"When things go badly, you find
out a lot about the people around
you," Carr said, seemingly referring
to last week's collapse at Purdue.
"And you find out a lot about your-
self.
Should the Boilermakers suffer
just one more Big Ten loss, Michigan
will once again be controlling its
own fate in the Rose Bowl race.

A late lunge: Thomas sees his destination and dives forward at the goal line,
capping his touchdown run.

PUNTING
Player
Epstein
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Cross 1
Total 1
PUNT RETURNS
Player No.
Bellamy 3
Walker 1
Bell 1
Totals 6
DEFENSE
Player
Howard
Pa tmoii
Hobson
E. Brackins
Drake
Spytek
D. Wiliarras
Curry
Foote
Jordan
Kashama
W~hit ley
Lazarus
Shaw
Casseus
Hose
Wood
Bowman
Epstein
Rumishek

No. Yds Avg Lg
1 67 67.0 67
1 67 67.0 67

DAVID KATZ/Daily
Junior Larry Foote and the Michigan defense rebounded after last week's debacle
to record their first shutout of the year. Antwaan Randle El was able to move the
ball against the Wolverines, but untimely blunders kept Indiana off the scoreboard.

Yds Avg Lg
26 26.0 26
26 26.0 26

TO
0
0
TO
0
1
0
1

Yds
26
41
68
Solo
6
6
4
3
2
3
3
2
'2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
Yds
0
0
0
0
0

Avg
8.7
41.0
1.0
1 1.3

Lg
13
41
41

Asst
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Tot
8
5
5
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1

OFFEN
Continued from Page 1B
Carr finally got some guts. And
it's about time. No score in the first
half of Saturday's game could have
been high enough. With just 12 sec-
onds left in the second half, the
Wolverines chose to run the ball
instead of just running out the
clock.
Some may call that unnecessary
-just take the knee and go into the
lockerroom. But the Wolverines
needed to capitalize on all the
opportunities they could,

111ev hlave learned that over tihe
past four games.
It may take a little extra beating
or minutes in practice to learn how
to pad a lead, but whatever it takes
it is worth it.
It's worth going through "hell" to
finally have win (or lose) a game
that didn't come down to the last
second of play.
- Stephanie O/efn was gd/at hat
/he verines took a large lead
earlil so that the A ichi an funs
could ge/ tth reverse-double wave
gointi at the bg(inning of the second
half She cat he reached at
.so1n(uich.edit.

Celebrate good times, come on: Thomas and the boys celebrate the run with a
group hug.

PASS DEFENSE
Player
E. Brackins
Foote
Paton
Totals

Int
0
0
0
1

Lng
0
0
0
0
0

Brk-up TO
1 0
1 0
10O
1 0
40a

STAFF PICKS
WEEK 6 SELECTIONS
ALL PICKS MADE AGAINST THE SPREAD.
HOME TEAMS IN CAPS.
MICHIGAN (-16) vs. Indiana
Wisconsin (-2.5) vs. MICHIGAN STATE
ILLINOIS (-12) vs. Iowa
Purdue (-4) vs. NORTHWESTERN
OHIO STATE (-10.5) vs. Minnesota

MARQUISE WALKER: The "old man"
came through with a couple of big
plays as Michigan trounced Indiana.
Walker's biggest play was slightly

David
Den Herder
Michigan
Wisconsin
Illinois
Purdue
Ohio State

Chris
Duprey
Indiana
Wisconsin
Illinois
Purdue
Ohio State

Michigan
Wisconsin
Illinois
Purdue
Ohio State

Mark
Francescutti

I

W vashington 21, ARIZONA STAT15 1.

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