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October 13, 2000 - Image 20

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-10-13
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October 14, 2000 - Th

6 - The Michigan Daily- FOOTBALL SATURDAY - October 14, 2000

'M' SPORTS SPOTLIGHT

WHEN MICHIGAN
HAS THE FOOTBALL

NO CONSOLATION - ICE BREAKER ENDS IN TIES
"ALL TIED UP"
Facing two of the nation's best, including top-ranked and defending national champion
North Dakota in the Ice Breaker Tournament, No. 2 Michigan (0-0-2) came out of the
opening weekend with two ties.
FRI., OCT. 6 - No. 16 COLGATE 2, No. 2 MIcHIGAN 2 (COLGATE ADVANCES IN SHOOTOUT)
Despite going 1-12 on the power play, Josh Langfeld's second tally of the game came
with the man-advantage - and it mattered the most as it tied the game, 2-2, late in the
second period. The game was sent into a deciding five-man shootout to find out who
would advance to the championship game the following night.
Colgate took full advantage of their shots, putting two past Michigan goalie Josh
Blackburn to win the shootout, 2-0.
SAT., OCT. 7 - No. 1 NORTH DAKOTA 2, No. 2 MICHIGAN 2
It was the matchup everyone wanted, only three hours earlier.
In a penalty-ridden consolation game between the top two teams in the nation, the es came
back from a two goal deficit in the third period to tie the Fighting Sioux, 5-5. A sheotout was deemec
unnecessary by both coaches, and each team tied for a third-place finish in ourney.
UP NEXT
The second-ranked Wolverines will take the cross-continent flight to rage, Alaska, to face Merrimack
and Alaska-Anchorage in the Johnson Nissan Classic this weeken in

I

32 Thomas TB
23 Perry

He's just a junior, but
he's known as the 'old
man' on the Michigan
roster. After two season
behind the scenes,
Mar uise Walker is
final y making ...

/

I

Te

04

FB 35 Askew
44 Armstrong

I Terrell
5 Bell.
SE
54 williams
77 Pape
RT

7 Henson
16 Navarre
QB
6? Brandt
78 Goodwin
C

72 Mast
78 Goodwin
RG

76 Hutchinson;
73 Denay
LG

79 Backus
74 Solomo
LT

s5

4 waiker
19 Bellamy
FL
83 Joppru
>n 81 Seymour
TE
RC
22 wallace
24 Floyd

Wa

DE
99 Barnett
94 Brown

LC
42 Stone
9 Spencer

DT NG
98 Smith 73 Mandina
83 Dielman 64 Williams
)0 Ge
.0. -~F

DE
92 Rasmussen
85 Anthony
WLB
7 Smith
43 Rodgers
S

By Mark Francescutti
Daily Sports Editor

SLB
8 Schaffer
49 Brown
sSS
15 Bethe
25 Gonza

WNIIISIJ YOGACIII/Daily

lIez

r:

13 Anderson
29 Young

Goalie never alone on ice

I

By Joe Smith
I ioly Sports Wnter
Junior Colgate netminder Jason
Lefevre lightly taps the crossbar four
times, kneels down and starts to pray just
before the shootout begins.
One might think that the goalie is just
begging that the pipes that surround him
will help deter the barrage of penalty
shots that the Wolverines will fire.
But to Lefevre, this display is nothing
out of the ordinary - -and its meaning
transcends any game he plays or any save
he makes.
His father died suddenly of an
aneurism this past spring, on the day
before his final exams started.
The man who had introduced him to
the game he loves at the age two - and
coached him on and off the ice through-
out his entire childhood - was gone.
Colgate coach Don Vaughan was
impressed with how Lefevre handled the
situation and "the way he responded-
the suminer that he had having to deal
with that."
This fall, Lefevre had to deal with
another tragedy close to him, as his best
friend's father died suddenly.
"So he's had to go back over all the
emotions again," Vaughan said. "But he's
trying to manage, even though it's some-
thing he definitely won't get over."
Instead of getting down and letting the
tragedy consume his life, Lefevre decid-
ed to make a statement, dedicating this
season in his father's memory.
So every time he takes the ice, he takes
the time in between periods to reflect and
communicate with his dad, whom he
feels is always there with him.
"I just talk to him," Lefevre said. "I tell
him how things are going and see if he's
going to be there for me. Sometimes he
wants me to let a few goals in just so that
I don't get too confident. It's a comforting
thing to know that he's there with me."
In his first game since his father's death
this past Friday against Michigan,
Lefevre was one of the only reasons
Colgate sent the game to overtime. The

HIoosiERs
TO WATCH
QB Antwaan Randle El
Passing.
62-131, 873 yds, 7 TD
Rushing:
85 rushes, 478 yards
5.6 yds per carry, 6 TD
RB Levron Williams
46 carries, 363 yds, 4 TD
WR Jerry Dorsey
14 rec, 321 yds, 3 TD
WR Versie Gaddis
11 rec, 218 yds, 1 TD
SS John Anderson
47 tackles, 1 blocked
kick
LB Justin Smith
34 tackles, 5 sacks
K Andy Payne
4-5 FG, 1 kick blocked

Marquise Walker looks ... mature. From the
dark-haired beard that covers his face to his deep
father-like voice, the 6-foot-3, 212-pound
Walker looks and sounds like an adult.
"I guess it's because rve got the beard,"
Walker said. "I get teased every day all day.
( David Terrell) teases me too.
'hey say, 'Old man, you're going pass out
while you're running a route you'd better ice
up after the game."'
Fven those who don't knobw Marqiuise as wvell
thinik he's 41.
"A couple guys, recruits, thought 1 was some-
body's father;" Walker said laughing.
But on the football field, Walker is anything
but old. In fact, he's a young 21-year-old wide
receiver that's trying to get older.
Ever since he shunned Syracuse, his home-
town school, to play for the Wolverines, Walker
has tried to outlive the shadows of other
Michigan receivers and break out for himself.
Coming to Michigan instead of Syracuse
posed a difficult proposition for Walker. Would
Michigan, a running team that likes to power the
football down the field, have enough ro i for
another wide receiver -even a top-five
prospect like Walker?
H is freshman year, he caught just four passes.
Playing among. six true freshmen is both an
honor and a statement of Lloyd Carr's impres-
sion of Walker, but things still weren't right.
Sophomore season came around, but the
headlines didn't. The excitement once again sur-
rounded Drew Henson and Terrell. Henson, afte
all, had encouraged Terrell to go to Michigan.
They were the future combo-to-be.
But where was Walker?
Walking among four receivers, that's where
He eventually caught 37 passes and earned time
over Diallo Johnson to grab the third receivei
spot. Still, this top prospect hadn't even startec
to climb the mountain, as there were too many
climbers ahead of him -- first there was Tai
Streets and then Marcus Knight - now, it's
Dave Terrell.
"Last year, 1 thought it was a learning experi-
ence playing behind Marcus and learning fron
Diallo," Walker said.
Well, the learning is now over for Walker
Now a junior and seen more as a leader than a
learner,-Walker is the No. 2 receiver with
plenty of chances to excel.
Walker only caught 37 passes last season, bu
already has 24 this year. But playcalling, ever
with Henson and a plethora of passing options
has remained grounded at times. Walker jus
hopes that the ball is thrown more - and he says
he'll be there when it does.
"When the ball comes to us were going t
catch the ball and if it comes seven eight timer
that means I'm going to catch the ball,' Walke
said. "If it comes one time to me in the game
I'm going to catch the ball that one time."
The frustration of a less-than-diverse offen
sive attack culminated in the first half of the
WNUI Day Wisconsin game and the second half of Purdue
And there's little Walker can do. unless h<

BRANDON SEDLOFF/Daily
Colgate goalie Jason Lefevre stoned all five of Michigan's players in last Friday's
shootout, including center Mike Cammalleri.

Antwaan Randle El

Red Raiders' goalie was constantly under
attack, as Michigan pelted 32 shots at
him, including eight in the extra session.
His quick glove save on Michigan
winger Scott Matzka's slapshot with just
a minute remaining in overtime kept
Colgate going and forced a five-man
shootout to decide who would play in the
championship game.
Lefevre was "unbelievable," Vaughan
said. "lie's been waiting patiently for this
chance and he answered the bell."
While Michigan consistently attacking
during the third period and the entire five-
minute overtime, the ice became a bit
chippy and rough in the Red Raiders
zone. Snow buildups around the crease
gave Lefevre an advantage, because it
inhibited the Wolverine snipers to cleanly
deke and make their best moves on the
Colgate netminder.
Lefevre still had to contain Michigan's
top scorers, trying to execute their best
moves in five penalty shots in order to
advance to the title game --- with the only
ones on the : ice being a Wolverine,
Lefevre and his father's memory.
The Red Raiders goalie proved up to

the challenge, shutting out all five of
Michigan's shooters.
"That's probably up there with one of'
the greatest moments I've had," said
Lefevre. "It was a great feeling to take a
win from them."
It was especially bittersweet for
Lefevre and the Red Raiders, since
Michigan ended their season in an over-
time thriller at last year's NCAAs.
Lefevre wasn't the starting goalie then.
Ile split duties with Shep Harder, who
graduated this past spring- as Colgate's
all-time leader in shutouts and goals
against average.
But it is now Lefevre's team, as he
takes the primary responsibility as start-
ing goaltender for No. 16 Colgate --- and
he doesn't mind the added pressure that
comes with it.
"I think I'm more confident in myself
now that I'm the guy' Lefevre said. "It
makes me step it up a little more."
And it helps that he knows he'll never
be alone on the ice.
"My dad's in my heart right now"
Lefevre said. "He never missed a game
and still will never miss a game.",

WHEN INDIANA
HAS THE FOOTBALL

5 Williams R
39 Dorsey
6 Frazier
WR
70 DeMar 75 Ohaufi
69 Taylor 52 Schwegmnan

IB

FB 26 Hogan
1 Johnson

11 Randle EF
14 Joe
7265 Genasci
C LG LT

RT
SCB
5 Whitley
12 Williams

RG

2 Gaddis
19 Graham
FL
81 Brandt
83 Dielman
TE
CB
3 Howard
21 LeSueur

DE
92 Rumishek
90 Coleman
OLB
6 Hobson
42 Spytek 4

NT
60 Bowman
90 Rose

DT
96 Wilson
97 Petruziello
~RLB
t 139 Kashama
1 95 Stevens

17 F
26 Curry
24 Drake

FS
15 Patmon
34 Fargas

Marquise Walker has caught more passes (16) in the past. two games than he did in his first four.

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