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October 06, 2000 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-10-06

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 6, 2000 - 5

Gore campaigns in Grand Rapids

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) - Vice President Al
Gore brought his presidential campaign back to this city
yesterday as he tried to convince undecided voters in politi-
cally conservative western Michigan to cast their ballots for
him on Election Day.
It was Gore's second campaign trip here in less than Il
weeks. While he focused on environmental issues during a
visit on July 24, he spoke yesterday of reforming health
care and providing tax relief to make child care more
affordable.
Gore's day started with a visit to United Methodist Com-
munity House, an inner-city daycare center, before heading
downtown to Calder Plaza for a campaign rally that drew sev-
eral thousand people. He planned to be in Lake Buena Vista,
Fla., last night:
"Too many families cannot afford the high-quality child
care that their children deserve and need," Gore said during

the rally. "I am proposing child-care tax credits that are
refundable that pay half of the cost of child care for all fami-
lies in this country, middle-class families."
The Democrat's visit to Grand Rapids on the same day
that his Republican rival, Texas Gov. George W. Bush,
stumped in the Detroit suburb of Royal Oak underscored
Michigan's importance as a battleground state in this year's
presidential election.
In all but one of the presidential elections since 1972,
Grand Rapids residents have mirrored those in Michigan
and the United States in voting for the winning presiden-
tial candidate, The Grand Rapids Press reported yesterday.
In 1976, Grand Rapids voters favored Gerald R. Ford,
who grew up in the city, over election winner Jimmy Carter.
Gore's return trip to a longtime GOP stronghold
intrigued political observers. Doug Koopman, a professor
of political science at Calvin College, said there potentially

could be strong support in the region for Gore and his run-
ning mate, U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman.
"There are a lot of votes up for grabs in western Michi-
gan," Koopman said. "I think the Gore-Lieberman ticket is
more appealing than some previous Democratic tickets."
Fence-sitters may opt to support Gore because of the
nation's robust economy during his more than seven years
as vice president. Meanwhile, Bush is far less appealing
than Gore to local unionized laborers, despite Gore's pro-
posal, outlined in his 1993 book, "Earth in the Balance:
Ecology and the Human Spirit," to someday eliminate the
internal-combustion engine.
"Maybe eight years ago what Gore has said about the
internal-combustion engine and the environment might
have worried those folks, but there's not another option
this year, and the labor-union base will stick with Gore,"
Koopman said.

Democratic presidential candidate Vice President Al Gore
shakes hands with supporters in Grand Rapids yesterday.

.Sotheby's
official
admits to
gonspiracy
NEW YORK (AP) -- The venerable
Sotheby's auction house and its former
chef executive pleaded guilty yesterday
to fixing commission prices and fees
with rival Christie's, admitting they had
ripped off clients for years.
Sotheby's, which controls virtually
the entire S4 billion worldwide auction
market along with Christie's, admitted
to an antitrust conspiracy uncovered
Sing a three-year investigation by the
ustice Department.
Former CEO Diana Brooks, the first
woman to head a major auction house
and one of the most powerful figures
in the art world over the past decade,
faces up to three years in federal
prison when she is sentenced Jan. 5.
Christie's, which earlier confessed
to its role in the scheme and cooperat-
with investigators, will not face
inal charges.
Federal prosecutors also promised
not to charge against any current or
former employee of Sotheby's'other
than Brooks and her one-time boss,
former Sotheby's chairman A. Alfred
Taubman. Both resigned in February.

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FALL MTINEES!
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9:50 FRIiSAT LS 11:50
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SAT'SUN 11:15, 1:10. 1:50, 4:15, 6:4(.
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2:40,4-45, 6:45, 9:00
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BRING IT ON PG-1:3
FRI 1:20, 3:25. 5:35, 7:330 9:30
SATSUN 11:10, 1:20, 3.25,5:35, 7:30
9:30 FRIUSAT L3 1125
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FRI 2:05,44 72 9:55
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CHICKEN RUN fG; IAl 12:50

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