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September 28, 2000 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-09-28

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2A - TheMichigan DaIly -- Thursday, September 28, 2000

NATION/WORLD

APA
Continued from Page :IA
heart of what we're doing."
He said while the Asian Pacific American, Latino/a and
Native American divisions are all housed within American
Culture, African American studies is a separate but related
department.
To celebrate the revisal of the APA division, the fac-
ulty is hosting a celebration today in Stillman's office,
2443 Mason Hall, now the central office of the APA
division.
The "event is a celebration to meet the programs faculty
and to celebrate the efforts of students, staff and faculty to

make it materialize," Stillman said.
Emily Lawsin, a lecturer ittAmerican Culture and
women's studies, was hired this year by the University to
teach classes in the APA division.
This semester Lawsin teaches two classes in Asian Pacif-
ic American studies, one dealing with Filipino American
literature, the other an oral history of Asian Pacific Ameri-
can women.
"I think that we live in a society where there are
many different cultures and races and backgrounds,
whether it's sex, class," she said. "All these different
backgrounds that make up our identity and we don't
always learn about these. Michigan is at a forefront of
doing that now."

FENCES
Continued from Page 1A
the long-term benefits in mind during
the years of renovation.
"One has to work at balancing
short-term impacts with long-term
impacts," she said.
While many students are frustrated
with the inconvenience of the fences,
others don't foresee major problems.
"It's going to be like everything else,
though, we'll just get used to it," said
Adelman.

ACROSS TH E NATION
Hollywood won't guarantee a change
WASHINGTON - Hollywood executives refused to guarantee to lawmaker
yesterday that they would end all marketing of R-rated films to underage auO
ences. Some acknowledged trying to market to children movies made for adults
an effort one studio chief called "a judgment lapse."
A day after the industry released its 12-step plan to stop "inappropritely
specifically" targeting children in advertising R-rated movies, lawmakers derid-
the effort as insufficient and pressed for firmer commitments.
"I don't understand this language. It is filled with loopholes," said Senate
Commerce Committee Chairman John McCain (R-Ariz.), who convened thi
hearing of eight top studio representatives.
Both the Democratic and Republican presidential campaigns weighed in, urg
ing movie makers to take more action.
o put it as bluntly as I can, they have not done enough," said Democratic
vice presidential nominee Joseph Lieberman. "They would not say explicitly tha
they would stop marketing adult-rated products to our children."
Lynne Ceney, wife of GOP vicempresidential candidate Dick Cheney, tqo
aim at both the industry asd the Democratic ticket, for its fund-raising eforts is
Hollywood.duig
Vice President Al Gore and Liebermans decry the industry's practicesduig
day, hut "antother message is delivered at night with a wink and a nudge' she said.,

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FDA poised to rule
on abortion pill
WASHINGTON - With a deadline
fast approaching, the Food and Drug
Administration was poised to decide,
perhaps as early as today, the fate of
the long-awaited abortion pill RU-486.
Abortion-rights advocates said
yesterday they expected the pill to be
approved under certain restrictions
designed to ensure women take it
safely.
If so, it would be a long-awaited vic-
tory for abortion-rights groups. Anti-
abortion organizations have battled to
keep RU-486 out of the United States
since the drug debuted in France in
1988 - and they pledged Wednesday
to continue fighting the drug if it is sold
here.
Approval has been long expected.
The Clinton adninistration in 1994 per-
suaded French manufacturer Roussel
Uclaf to give U.S. rights to the pill to
the nonprofit Population Council,
shich hired a U.S. marketing company
to apply for FDA clearance. In 1996,
the FDA declared RU-486, now known

by its chemical name mifepristone, safe
and effective for early abortion. Bu
problems passing manufacturing ane
labeling requirements delayed fina
approval. The FDA had set Saturday am
its deadline to decide, and could accep
or reject the drug or request more infor
mation.
Farners feud over
value of livestock
VERMONT - The conflict nyc:
the potential contamination of sheep a
two Vermont farms is pitting fart el
against farmer. Linda and Larry Fail-
lace estimate that if their sheep art
seized, they should be compensate
SI1.3 million, or more than $100,4
per sheep. "If you look at it on a pe
aninal basis, that's a really high num
ber," Linda Faillace said. "But if.yo
look at it, this is what we've put our la5
seven years into."
Houghton Freeman's farm, whici
has twice the number of sheep as th
Faillaces', estimate its loss between $
million and S2 million, including fare
facilities such as their milking parlo4

8, 5 i ""
£ s '
f
i a y '
sa p
S f Z 'QSb l 4 Cc

AROUND THE WORLD
MiloSeviC op onents would recognize th
truth," Kostunica s
claim election victory w e would recognize
man, Slobodan Mil
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - More than the will of the e
than 200,000 joyful opponents of Slo- The opposition, w
bodan Milosevic swarmed the capi- poll watchers, claim
tal's downtown district yesterday, 52 percent to Milosc
supporting an opposition claim of an enough for a first-ri
electoral triumph over the Yugoslav five-candidate field.
president.
The biggest demonstration ever Greek
against Milosevic completely blocked Cre
Ielgrade's main streets and Republic in ferry dr
Square. Much of the downtown area
emed with people waving flags and ROME - Greek
chmantmimg. a sea captain and
Throughout Serbia, the main criminal negligenc
Yugoslav republic, thousands drowning deaths of
streamed into city streets, celebrating after their ferry str
what seemed an overwhelming oppo- rocky islet in the Ae
sition victory at last weekend's presi- ly as most of the crc
deusmial, parliamsentary amnd nunsicipal vised soccer match.
elections. After 24 hours off
Vojislav Kostunica, who the opposi- hampered by gale-f
tion claims defeated Milosevic in officials reportedsthat
Sunday's vote, told the crowd there into the waterTuesda
will be no runoff.
"if we bargained with them, then we - Compiled f oit

e lie instead of th
uid. "If we hargair
that the will of ont
osevic, was strongc
ntire nation."
sing figures frorm
ted Kostunica wo
evic's 32 percent
ound victory in th,
w nameI
rownings
authsorities accem
four cresvmenn
e yesterday in th
at least 62 peopk
uck a well-mark(
gean Sea, reported
ew watched a tele
fiantic rescue efforit
orce winds, Greg
t 448 people throws
y had been saved,
Dai/v wire reprls

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