100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 25, 2000 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10A=- The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 25, 2000

ARTS

SINGH
Continued rm Page 9A
importance of secrecy and how it
plays an essential role in this record
of cryptography; secrecy drives one
to make codes, similarly, it impels
another to break codes.
An engaging tale of buried secrets
and the techniques of solving them,
"The Code Book" absorbs the reader
and actually gives you something to
think about, beyond the mystery, past
the suspense, its teachings linger in

your mind and dwell in your psyche.
After reading this book, you'll never
leave a puzzle unsolved. And Singh's
promise of S15,000 from his own
pocketbook as a prize for solving the
code at the finale of the book only
offers further incentive for breaking
another code.
So when Simon says solve, we
solve. And if Simon says clap your
hands, we would undoubtedly
applaud Simon for successfully
engrossing us in his games and puz-
zles.

Jarrett: Blahing the blues away at Hill

By John Uhl
Daily Music Editor
Saturday night, the troll of Hill Audi-
torium lurked beneath the stage.
The haughty imminence of Hill
quells nearly a block of North U. Pastel
blue and glimmer gold, its halo arc hov-

The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan
announces
TH ETANNER LECTURE ON
HUMAN VALUES
2000-01
Partha Dasgupta
Frank Ramsey Professor of Economics
University of Cambridge
Valuing Objects and Evaluating Policies:
Economic Well-Being and the Natural
Environment
Friday, October 6, 4:00 p.m.
Rackham Amphitheatre, 915 East Washington Street
SYMPOSIUM ON THE TANNER
LECTURE
Partha Dasgupta
Debra Satz
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Stanford University

Keith
Jarrett
Hill Auditorium
Sept. 23. 2000

ers over azure
organ pipes with
the puritanical
precedence that
elevates Hill
above lesser Ann
Arbor venues:
The maize and
blue crown jewel
of the Universi-
ty's auditoriums.
Yet under the
perfect echo of its
veering dome,
the impish

Courtesy o fUM
Jack DeJohnette, Keith Jarrett and Gary Peacock lulled Hill to sleep.

rious for humming along with his
improvising, a fairly common fetish
among jazzers. But Jarrett squirms over
his piano bench like a bored child,
shrieking like a pig in a slaughterhouse.
The irony of this distraction is that
Jarrett is very fickle about the acoustics
accompanying his playing situations.
Ann Arbor was one of only five stops
for the pianist this fall. And as Jarrett
has cataloged over fifty albums for
ECM (a label that is renowned for sap-
ping the life out of recordings by many
fantastic jazz musicians), the choice of
Hill's cavernous dry hall as a perfor-
mance space is rather apt.

squeaks of an animated gargoyle,
unaware of the concert above by Keith
Jarrett, Gary Peacock and Jack
DeJohnette, were audible. At least that's
the way I'd like to think of it.
What I was really hearing was the
awful whine of Jarrett singing along
with his piano. The jazz pianist is noto-

More than anything, it's indicative of
the misguided sentiment that jazz
should be regarded as "America's clas-
sical music." The green idea of Wynton
Marsalis and a few other uncreative cats
from the '80s, neo-classicism and the
modern trend of featuring blockbuster
jazz names (like Jarrett, Peacock and
DeJohnette) on expensive tickets seems
bent on removing everything that's
dirty about jazz from the music.
Jazz used to be written about in dirty
books. White jazz musicians were for-
saken by their families for playing the
music, which was spawn in whorehous-
es. The word jazz itself originally held
sexual connotations. A pianist used to
be able to groan to his music without
seeming odd. Now it costs S35 to get
into the Blue Note and Lincoln Center
is building a whole complex for the
promotion of its jazz program.
Now, a bunch of tight-assed Ann
Arborites sit in Hill Auditorium in utter,

painstaking silence. (After commenting
on the performance, I was actually
shushed by one woman, a gesture that
is such the antithesis of jazz's social ori-
gins that it nearly made me sick enough
to puke on her.) And what they hear
was one of the most soulless, borin
performances I've ever witnessed.
Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette have
been interpreting standards, the body of
American popular songs from the '30s-
'50s, since 1983. Unfortunately, an
extended vamp ending to "Autumn
Leaves," a one-key piece that is a lot
like a long vamp anyway, was last
night's only product from 20 years of
tinkering with form. Most of the tunes
featured extensive piano introductio
and piano solos with brief additions b
Peacock's bass or DeJohnette's drums.
Occasionally they traded fours.
That Peacock and DeJohnette didn't
play more was particularly disappoint-
ing, since their pithy contributions were
generally more inspired than the solip-
sistic meandings of Jarrett, whose end-
less phrases rarely build to any
definable climax or denouement.
I left in disgust when the tri
kicked off their encore of "When
Fall In Love," a song that never hear-
ing again will help me die as a happy
man (save for the Miles Davis Quintet
rendition).
Basically: The sound of my own uri-
nation would have been more musical-
ly stimulating than what was played.
Keith Jarrett took two and a half hours
away from my life that I'd like back.

JOIN. TH E MOST PROMISING
PROFESSION OF THE 21ST CENTURY
BECOME A TEA CIIRB
Prospective Teacher Education Meeting
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
6:00 P.M.
Schorling Auditorium
Room 1202 School of Education Building
For more information call 764-7563

!'

Personal...
Focused...
Effective...
With a maximum of 8 students per
instructor, The Princeton Review's GRE
class is almost like having a private
tutor!
Classes starting soon.
Spaces are limited.

Samuel C.

T.N. Srinivasan
Parks, Jr. Professor of Economics
Yale University

Jeremy Waldron
Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law
Columbia University Law School
Saturday, October 7, 9:15 a.m.
Vandenberg Room, Michigan League
All events open to the public without charge

1.800.2 REVIEW
www.review.com

Eton.
Review

Life is a series of choices.

I.

:' ..

ill
"U
L~j

0
0

'J

We suggest ON.

,_ * : *.*.w "CAREER FAIR
suiabmjo.rnwhs wud Tuesday, September 26
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
EECS BUILDING
We will be interviewing for the following positions:
gu"us n hn uiDESIGN ENGINEERS
yorpteta,"o-ar rm-h"es n t .-FIELD APPLICATION ENGINEERS
tug wat-edge"eader, thenTEST ENGINEERS
wtbtrpetsttyraerhneSYSTEM ENGINEERS
PRODUCT ENGINEERS
PROCESS ENGINEERS
APPLICATION ENGINEERS
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS
s"s- "ennvvadtvdON Semiconductor offers highly competitive compensation and outstand-
ing benefits, including a supportive and growth-oriented environment,
industry-leading training, comprehensive healthcare, retirement savings

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan