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September 22, 2000 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ne miencgan uany -- rnaay, aeptemoer zz, zuu - r

Ford and Firestone appear
before House committees

WASHINGTON (AIP) - The
public finger pointing between cen-
tury-long business partners Ford
otor Co. and Bridgestone/Fire-
stone Inc. resumed yesterday with
the tire maker charging that Ford's
lower tire pressure recommendation
for the popular Explorer model
makes the vehicle less safe.
Officials from both companies went
before two House subcommittees
investigating the recall of Firestone
tires that have been linked to 101 U.S.
traffic deaths. The tires are standard
equipment on the Explorer, the world's
*st-selling sport utility vehicle.
Bridgestone/Firestone Executive
Forever young
-i I

Vice President John Lampe said the
tire maker sent a letter to Ford on
Wednesday requesting that it raise the
recommended pressure for the tires
from 26 pounds per square inch to 30
pounds - the level already suggested
by Bridgestone/Firestone.
"We now know that at 26 psi there is
a low safety margin for the Explorer as
compared to some other SUVs,"
Lampe said. "Running an Explorer on
low tire pressures, overloaded, in hot
climates appears to be a part of the
problem that we're now facing."
Helen Petrauskas, Ford Vice Presi-
dent for environment and safety engi-
neering, countered that "for the better

part of 10 years Firestone agreed and
repeatedly supported and certified to
the recommended tire pressure of 26
psi."
"All the requisite testing which
needs to be done at the recommended
customer tire pressure was done," she
said.
Bridgestone/Firestone last month
recalled 6.5 million ATX, ATX 11 and
Wilderness AT tires, most of which
were original equipment on Explorers.
Thousands of people, most of them
Explorer owners in warm-weather
states, have reported tread separations,
blowouts and other problems with the
tires.
FUNDRAISER
Continued from Page 1
Calling the University "the most
wonderful thing that ever happened to
me," Rogel described the need for
more funds for scholarships, especial-
ly for those paying out-of-state
tuition.
After his presentation, Rogel said he
believes Bollinger and the administra-
tion will develop a successful cam-
paign.
If (the University) were a public
stock, I'd buy it," Rogel said.
Feagin avoided questions about the
final goal for the fundraiser, simply
saying "it really is too early to talk
about that"
Regent Dan Horning (R-Grand
Haven) immediately responded, "but
we're still going to ask."
"We're going to try to raise more
money than before," Feagin said.
Feagin, Bollinger and Rogel all
stressed that statirg a goal prema-
turely could possibly hurt the cam-
paign because in setting any
campaign goal, Bollinger said, "you
must not fail."
Feagin added that there is not only a
danger of setting a goal that is too
high, but also setting a goal that is too
low.
If earlier campaigns, including
Campaign for Michigan are any
indication, the University should
not have any problem meeting that
goal.
From 1998-1999, the University
ranked sixth in the nation for private
donations with gifts totaling S76.9
million.
Today's healthy economy, said Fea-
gin, makes this an ideal time to start
another campaign.
The current record is held by Har-
vard University, who in 1999 raised
S2.1 billion.
Feagin worked on that campaign
before coming to Michigan.
Regents Andrea Fischer Newman
(R-Ann Arbor) and S. Martin Taylor
(D-Grosse Pointe Farms) both said
they were excited about the new cam-
paign and would be happy to lend their
support.
"We'll do whatever we possibly
can," Newman said.
"I don't like to speak for all the
regents, but I think it was pretty obvi-
ous that the regents support the cam-
paign," she said.

Steelcase, Inc. is a successful compary that promotes a healthy balance between
career and personal life. As the preeminent designer and manufacturer of over 540
different lines of products used to create high-performance working environments,
it Is by no coincidence that we know what it takes to accommodate our own
employees. We are now making it more convenient than ever to learn more about
us by coming to visit you! Take the first step towards a rewarding new career by
stopping by to see us at the
U of M Engineering Career Fair
Tuesday, September 26
We are currently considering new graduates for positions in:
Engineering and Information Systems
At Steelcase, we won't try to mold you into something you're not. Instead we'll
nurture and develop the talents you already have. We hope that you will stop by
our booth and learn more about the advantages and benefits that Steelcase has to
offer. If unable to attend the Career Fair, we are still willing to accommodate you.
Just visit our Web site at www.steelcase.com or send your resume to:
Steelcase, Inc., CR2001, P.O. Box 1967, CS-3E, Grand Rapids, MI
49508; Fax: (616) 246-4603; E-mail: staffing@steelcase.com
Steelcase strongly supports a diverse workplace and welcomes all appliccnts.

w CARRIE MCGEE/Daily
Gene Wilson, an Ann Arbor resident since 1972, sits in his house on
Hamilton Street. Wilson said he and his wife enjoy living near students.

that the Michigan
ment Corporation
Continued from Page 1 with the tobacco
governor decided to distribute such a Wondergem, vice
large amount of funding for research munications at the
because of the nigh quality of research Wayne State Res
already being done in Michigan. Michael Anderso
University President Lee Bollinger will also give sma
WdMichigar State President M. Peter ing in cooperation
ScPherson fushed for more funding the funding neced
this summer lruscott said the opening projects.
of the Van Andel Institute in April also "It will provide
influenced Frngler's decision. opportunity) to e
"They have Nobel laureates from developments," An
around the world," Truscott said. Truscott said lam
"There's a lot of brainpower over tions like pharma
there," he said, referring to the four may benefit as we
participating institutions. "We really the universities and
laan on building on that." the funding.
He added that the governor's goal is Jennifer Kopp, s
to make the corridor one of the leading MEDC said once
research areas in the country. on which of the 60
Truscott said the 20 year effort hopes als will receive fur
to model itself after the "Research TI- details will be avail
angle" in North Carolina, which "We want to dev
includes facilities at Duke University, ical corridor, clu
University of North Carolina and North and universities
Carolina State University. where students can
"We hope to collaborate with all in the life science
three universities, and we are delighted Ann Arbor or Mich
&recn Party ticke
REGENT
Continued from Page 1
Republicans Suzy Avery, state tourism director, and
Wendy Anderson, long-time GOP activist, are also vying
for a seat on the board, along with several other third party
candidates.
Trudeau, who is funding his campaign on his own, said
believes he has a chance of getting onto the board.
"I don't think it's completely impossible, but the odds
aren't in my favor. But I would love to sit on the Board of
Regents:' Trudeau said.
For many years, the Michigan Student Assembly has
fought to be able to have a student representative on the
board, but to no avail.
Michigan Student Assembly Vice President, Jim Secreto
said a student sitting on the board of regents would give stu-
dents direct say in what goes oii at the University.
"Right now students have an indirect say in what happens
the University. But if we get a regent, we ca push a bit,"
creto said.
Secreto said the assembly is not currently working on
getting a student representative appointed to the board.

Economic Develop-
decided to do this
money," said Casey
president for com-
Van Andel Institute.
search Grant Officer
II said the money
11 btusiiiesses, work-
with the university,
ed for life science
organizations (the
Xplore a lot of new
dhersoni said.
rge private corpora-
ceutical companies
,1 if they work with
I supply a portion of
pokesperson for the
the MFDC decides
0 submitted propos-
iding, more specific
able.
elop an actual phys-
sters of businesses
working together
intern or get a job
es without leaving
higan," Kopp said.

Transforming the ways people work

tfeatures student
Regent Olivia Maynard (D-Goodrich) said she doesn't
like the idea of just putting a student on the board.
"It's OK if he runs, but just having a student doesn't nec-
essarily change much." Maynard said.
Maynard said there may be !egal issues that Trudeau will
face if he makes it on the board.
"After I made it, I had to resign from being a professor
because I couldn't be both a faculty member and a regent,"
Mayird said. "It would b: a conflict of interest. Some of
the things regents do impact students, like fees and tuition."
"A governing body must be objective. If students are on the
board, some votes may impact them personally," she said.
Secreto said he doesn't think Trudeau has much of a
chance of winning the election.
"As a third party candidate, he has no chance. It's
admirable and his heart is in the right place, but very rarely
does a third party candidate win," Secreto said.
Maynard also said she thought Trudeau's biggest weak-
ness would be that he is running with a third party.
"If Ralph Nader and the Green Party carried the state of
Michigan in the presidential elections, he would win,: May-
nard said. "But he's running on a party that won't get a lot
of votes."

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