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September 08, 2000 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-09-08

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12 - The Michigan Daily -- Friday, September 8, 2000

Improvements should be.
completed by October 2002

HAVEN
Continued from Page 1
healthier person," she aaid.
"After two years of renovations, I expect
Haven Hall to be quite grand," she added.
Assistant history Prof. Stefanie Siegmund
said she also can see the plus side of the
changes.
"There's enormous time lost in packing and
unpacking, but it's all for a good cause," she said.
Siegmund pointed out that the University
Towers offices all have air conditioning, which
wasn't the case in Haven Hall.
History department Chair Fred Cooper said
he hopes students won't get frustrated with the
change.
"Hopefully, it will only be a minor inconve-
nience. They just have to walk further to talk to
faculty" Cooper said.
All political science offices that were formerly
housed in the Haven Hall complex are located in

"It's a little bit of a
longer walk each day,
but it will make me a
healthier person."
- Margaret Howard
Assistant political science professor
the Church Street building.
Siegmund said students should head to
University Towers for history faculty office
hours and Tisch Hall for the history advising
office and paperwork concerning majors and
minors.
"The faculty has been very cooperative,"
Jones said.
"I'm sure some don't want to be three blocks
from main campus, but they've had consistently
positive attitude," Jones added.

Construction begins for the the Mason and Haven Hall renovations. The improvements req
history and political science departments to relocate to off-campus venues.

1:JOBSOTOTI*

American Express to
o er disposable card

FALL TERM

Apply now at the
w Library-
ion-Law Students
Law Students
SS.L Students
ly in person: Room S-180

NEW YORK (AP) - American
Express said yesterday that it will
offer disposable credit card numbers
for safer online shopping.
The initiative, called Private Pay-
ments, will be offered free next
month to American Express cus-
tomers and small business cardhold-
ers in the United States.
The program is part of a series of
products the New York-based cornpa-
ny will be launching to address priva-
cv and security issues that have
discouraged many people from online
shopping.
Private Pavments allows customers
to buy online without transmitting
actual card numbers over the Internet.
For each online purchase, the cus-

torter obtains from an American
Express Web site a random number
that expires after the transaction.
"Consumers have a real fear of
having their credit card stolen," said
Alfred Kelly, Jr., group president of
U.S. consumer and small business
services at American Express. "This
fear is the biggest obstacle for a real
boom in e-commerce.
American Express has made sever-
al moves to address privacy and secu-
rity, including its offering of its Blue
card. The card, introduced a year ago,
is embedded with a chip that allows
coinsuiers to transfer credit card
information directly to online mer-
chants via a card-reading device that
is attached to PCs.

-Ii

Rebecca Blank, dean of the School of Public Policy, addresses a crov
than 90 yesterday at a welfare reform forum in the Michigan Union.

REFORM
Continued from Page 1
the current success of various govern-
ment programs under TANF cannot be
guaranteed under the pressures of an
unstable economy.
Mead disagreed with Blank's
emphasis on the correlation between
the success of welfare reform and the
growth of the economy, arguing
instead that it is only part of a larger
picture.
"I would judge that half (ofTANF's
success) is due to balk employment, a
third is due to the economy and the
rest is due to other factors," Mead
said.
Mead stated that it is necessary to
promote employment of those on and
off welfare, saying "unemployment is
important not only in changing peo-
ple's lives, but in changing the tone of
welfare."
Danziger introduced statistics indi-

eating a dominant link between non-
working recipients and psychiatric
problems, a circumstance he referred
to as a type of "barrier."
The panelists argued whether such
recipients could be taught certain job
skills despite their debilitating condi-
tions.
The argument led the panelists to
discuss the issue of term limits applied
to TANF programs.
Blank argued that barriers could
legitimize limits of 15 to 20 years for
recipients.
The panelists agreed that if states
continue to have fiscal surpluses dur-
ing the continuation of the program,
the money Congress allots to states for
TANF will be relatively small.
They concluded unanimously that in
the end, the economy will determine
the fate of TANF, but inevitably policy
makers will fail to make any changes
until the economy itself takes a turn
for the worse.
SICK OF
CLASSES
ALREADY?.
JOIN THE
DAILY.

New polli
puts Bush,
Gore in
dead heat.
The Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Al Gore and
George W Bush are locked in a dead-
even race for the White House,
according to a new Washington Post-
ABC News Poll, with Gore having
consolidated gains he made at is con-
vention and enjoying the edge on who
is best equipped to handle the issue
voters say are most important to them.
The Post-ABC poll reveals an elec-
torate that is sharply divided over the
choice for president in November but
relatively contented with both major
party candidates. With two months
remaining before election day, the poll
foreshadows a fiercely competitive
contest ahead as Gore attempts to cap-
italize on the strong economy and
Bush seeks to make a compelling ca*
for changing parties after eight years
of Democratic control.
In a four-way matchup, Gore and
Bush each received 47 percent support
among likely voters, with Green Party
nominee Ralph Nader at 3 percent and
disputed Reform Party nominee Pat
Buchanan an asterisk. In a hypotheti"
cal two-way race, Bush led Gore 49
percent to 47 percent.
The polls taken immediately afte,
Labor Day this year are considere
especially important by presidential
candidates because they are the first
that measure the lasting impact of the
summer political conventions, and
they mark the moment in the race that
many Americans begin to pay seriou$
attention to the candidates.
In the past four elections, the candi
date ahead at Labor Day has gone on
to win the White House. Twice sinc
World War Il - in 1960 and 1980
the races were statistically tied at this
stage. The 1960 race stayed close until
the end, with John F. Kennedy narrow
ly defeating Richard M. Nixon. Th
1980 contest broke open in late Octo
her, with Ronald Reagan easily defeat-
ing incumbent Jimmy Carter. Both
campaigns said they expect this race t
remain competitive until the end.
The new Post-ABC findings repre-
sent a slight narrowing in the ra
since the weekend immediately afte
Gore's convention last month, when
the Democratic nominee led Bush bh
48-44 percent. But more important,
the polls shows the clear shift that has
occurred since Julyjust before the two
major party conventions were held,
when Bush led Gore by 8 percentage
points.
Unlike Bush, who surged to a dou-
ble-digit lead at the time of the G
convention, only to see it begin to
evaporate the following week, Gore
has retained most of the support he
acquired at his convention.
The race has polarized along classic
lines. Men support Bush by 52-38 per-
cent, while women support Gore by an
identical margin. Gore enjoys the sup-
port of about eight in 10 Democrats,
while Bush has the backing of almost
nine in 10 Republicans. Independent
voters narrowly favor Bush. G*
holds a clear lead in the Northeast, but
in every other region, including the
battleground Midwest, the poll finds

the race i statistically tied.poe nr
The poll is based on telephone inter-
views with 1,065 registered voters
nationwide, including 738 likely voters
and was conducted Sept. 4-6. The
margin of sampling error for the over-
all results is plus or minus 3 perce-
age points and 4 percentage points
results based on the sample of likely
voters.%
After trailing most of the year, Gore
not only has wiped out Bush's overall
lead, but also has seized the advantage
on a number of key questions of char-
acter and on issues.
Gore currently leads Bush as the
candidate voters say is best able to
deal with nine of the 17 issues tested
in the survey, including educati -
health care and prescription drug -
efits for the elderly, the econdmy and
Social Security - issues that votets
said are critically important to then
this election year.
Bush currently holds a clear lead on
only two: taxes and defense. Six weeks
ago, Bush led Gore on seven issues
while the Democrat was favored on
only two: health care and the-environ-
ment.
Some of these shifts have beendra-
matic. Five weeks ago, Bush main-
tained a 13-point advantage as the
candidate best able to manage the fed-
eral budget; today, Gore leads by 5
points, an 18-point swing.
The vice president has turned a
nine-point deficit into an five-point
lead on the issue of the candidate best
able to handle the national economy
and has gone from being even with
Bush on education to a 12-p*t
advantage.
The candidates are tied on six
issues, including the traditional
Republican issue of crime, where
Bush had a 20-point lead over'Gore in
July.
Neither candidate is seen as better
able to reform campaign finance laws,
an area where Republicans believe that
Gore is vulnerable.

Food For Thought
What DestroyedVietnam's
Past-War Economy?
Truong Nhu Tang was a founder
of the National Liberation Front
(Viet Cong); later Minister of
Justice and a diplomat. In his
book, "A Viet Cong Memoir he
does not blame the American
embargo in Vietnam, but instead
blames the post-war bloodbath,
plus the greed and corruption of
the North Vietnamese victors.
Gary Lillie & Assoc., Realtors
www.garylillie.com

MASS MEETING
TUESDAY AT
7 P.M.

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the need for Doctors of Pbdiatric Medicine has never been greater.
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Win a $1,000 scholarship Enter the Sole Seching Eissy Contest
Enter online at wwe-ole-eer--'-'Y."ho"n, but hurry, the contest endl Septenibe.r30th.
a 1

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