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December 11, 2000 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-12-11

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 11, 2000 - 7A

. , _.

(bodes scholars include wide array of students'

e Associated Press
Matthew Baugh knew he was making an
impact on public health in rural Haiti when he
overheard someone in the local marketplace
Singing a song Baugh had penned about hyper-
tension.
ICI Creole swing time, it went: Don't get
dehydrated. Don't smoke or drink too much
coffee. Get frequent checkups. An inexpensive
Thedication is available.
On Saturday, Baugh was named one of 32
Arrierican students chosen to receive Rhodes
scholarships for two to three years' study at
Oxford University in England.

Other recipients include an AIDS researcher, a"
prison tutor, a theater director and students who
have worked with people in need around the
globe.
"This is my first attempt at songwriting," said
Baugh, a Duke University senior from Raleigh,
N.C. ie also wrote a lullaby about breast-feed-
ing and short programs on health issues from
parasites to prenatal care for a radio audience of
about 40,000.
The Rhodes scholarship, created from the
will of British philanthropist and colonialist
Cecil Rhodes, is the oldest international study
award available to American scholars. Winners

achievement, personal integrity, leadership
potential and physical vigor, among other
attributes.
Winners this year were chosen from 950
applicants endorsed by 327 colleges and
universities; Yale led with three recipients.
So far, 2,918 Americans have won the schol-
arships.
Expectations are high for the scholars, who
follow in the footsteps of President Clinton,
Supreme Court Justice David Souter, three
members of the Senate and four members of
Congress, said Elliot Gerson, American secre-
tary of the Rhodes Scholarship Trust.
"We look for people to play an influential

part in the future of society, wherever their
careers might lead them," Gerson said. "As
every year, it's an extraordinary group of young
people."
Indiana University senior Raju Raval, of Fort
Wayne, Ind., said he may follow his studies at
Oxford by seeking a career as a cancer
researcher or a role in public health policy. He
said the death of his mother, Chandrika, four
years ago, helped focus his interest in medi-
cine.
"I don't look at it as an achievement," Raval
said of the Rhodes scholarship. "I look at it as
an opportunity."
When he found out he'd won, Luke Bronin, a

Greenwich, Conn., resident and Yale student,
called his parents, who were driving to pick:him
up.
"They tried not to crash and screamedhe
said.
The history and philosophy major started a
tutoring program in the New Haven Cofrec-
tional Center.
"It's difficult every time I go in there" Bronin
said, noting that many of the inmates are his age.
"But it's also been really rewarding in a fot of
ways.
Another Yale recipient, Brian Mullin of Mil-
ton, Mass., has directed six plays and written and
performed another.

are selected

on the basis of high academic

INIMUMS
ontonued from Page 1A
it fo transactions. Besides, policies against having mini-
mums benefit companies that accept credit cards, Lowe
said.
"There are some patrons who won't come unless they can
tzsc their credit card," she said.
,Lpwe said in the event that establishments are violat-
ing these policies, MasterCard "works with their
acquiring bank to get that to stop." After more than one
Astance of not adhering to the policies, fines can be
mpcsed.
New York Pizza Depot, located at 605 E. William
St., has a 50-cent surcharge for credit card purchases
under S4. NYPD manager Marco Telemaco justified
the surcharge by saying that on "every (credit card)
transaction they (acquiring banks) charge you 25 cents
plus two-point-something percent of the purchase
price."
When asked if he was violating the agreement that NYPD
signed with its acquiring bank by adding a surcharge, he said,
I don't remember."
Nizar Eliwar, owner of the Oasis Deli, located at 1106 S.
niversity Ave., said on every credit card transaction there.
is a fee of about 25 cents plus an additional percentage of
the profits, although he could not remember the exact per-
centage.
For that reason, he says, the store must set a S5 mini-
mum. But, he said, the store is not very strict on the
policy.
f someone wants to insist that they pay with a credit
caid, I'll let them do it," Eliwar said.
"I know how important it is to customers to use a credit
ard," he said. "But we have to do something about SI pur-
chases with a credit card."
Khee Kwok, manager of Dinersty Restaurant at 241
E. Liberty St., said his restaurant also has to pay a 25-
cent transaction fee along with a percentage of profits
tp Ats acquiring bank. For that reason, the restaurant
ha' a S5 minimum.
"If somebody comes over and doesn't have cash, we
take the credit card ... but we don't make money," he
.said. "Some people add a handling charge - there's
nothing wrong with that - but we don't do that,"
wok said.
Blue Front, located at 701 Packard St., "used to have a
minimum, but we don't anymore," owner Primo Kang
said.
Kang said Blue Front changed its policies because cus-
tomers "complained and we need more volume ... now we
accept any amount."
LSA sophoniore Brett Visncr recently was told he could'
not pay with a credit card for a small purchase. at Blue,
Front.
a "It's kind of annoying. I couldn't buy anything," Visner

ELECTION
Continued from Page 1A
suggesting Gore might await
appeals of failed Democratic law-
suits seeking to throw out up to
25,000 Florida absentee ballots.
"I'm not going to say what's going
to happen," Boies said.
House Minority Leader Richard
Gephardt, a steadfast Gore support-
er, told ABC, "I believe he will"
concede if the court rules against
him --- and Bush should do the same
if the tables are turned.
A spokeswoman later said the
Missouri lawmaker would defer to
Gore's judgment if the vice presi-
dent thought he had other legal
options.
"I believe that probably is the last
word, and it's the last chance to
have this issue not go to the United
States Congress," Sen. Robert Tor-
ricelli (D-N.J.) said of the court.
The GOP-led Florida Legislature,
under guidance from the Bush
camp, is preparing to appoint its
own slate of Bush electors - rais-
ing the possibility of two separate
slates for a divided Congress to sort
out.
Gore's own advisers said privately
the pressure to concede would be
unbearable if the Democrat lost the
Supreme Court fight.

They discussed worst-caste,~ -
narios in small groups over the
weekend, including the possibility
Gore would suspend his caniaign
with a high-minded speech;1hat
stopped just short of a concession.-
That would leave his options
open in the unlikely event that
Democrats prevail in the absentee
ballot cases or the Supreme Court
ruling is viewed as partisan and
political pressure builds against
Bush, senior advisers said.
They stressed that no recornmen-
dations have been made to More,
the son of a senator who fir. than
for president in 1988. They said
their boss appeared to be confident
of victory in the high court.
The presidents-in-waiting laid
low yesterday.
Gore went to church, where-the
sermon was titled "Preparatio'n"
and Rev. Martha Phillips prayed for
the country "in this time ottr-
moil."
Bush traveled from his sec;tded
ranch to the Texas capital in Austin,
where he was throwing a Christmas
party.
The Supreme Court is pressing
against deadlines set in federal law.
States must assign electors torpor-
row, and those individuals meet
Dec. 18 as the Electoral College to
name the nation's next president.

ELLE WHITE/Daily
Falun Gong member Benjamin Yang of Windsor meditates yesterday with others in the Chemistry

Building.
FALUN
Continued from Page1A
"Falun Gong is a spiritual practice of mind
and body, which is rooted in ancient Chinese
culture," Sun said.
Meaning "the cultivation of principle," Falun
Gong was founded in China in 1992 by Li
Hiongzhi. The group has attracted followers in
more than 30 different countries.
Sun said since the outlaw of Falun Gong
in China, Hongzhi has fled to the United
States to escape political persecution but
thousands of followers remain and continue
to practice the triad of "truthfulness, benevo-
lence and forbearance."
In the past six months, Sun said, the Chinese
government has committed atrocities against
Falun Gong followers.
"The practice is peaceful and apolitical," lie
said. "The only so-called crime (practitioners)
have committed was their attempt to exercise
their riglits to freedom of belief, assembly and
speech."
About 10 percent of China's 1.3 billion
inhabitants continue to practice Falun Gong,
Sun said.
According to estimates from Amnesty Inter-
national, a worldwide organization focused on
protecting human rights, more than 50,000

practitioners have been arrested.
"Many followers have been tortured," said
Abdurrahman Baris, Michigan-area state coor-
dinator of Amnesty International.
"Some have been placed into psychiatric hos-
pitals and forced to take drugs, Baris said. "At
least 10 have died under suspicious causes."
Others have been sentenced without trial for
continuing to practice Falun Gong without trial
and have been sent to labor camps throughout
China.
Sun said the government's harsh treatment of
Falun Gong followers is rooted in the govern-
ment's fear of uncontrollable groups.
"The main reason is there are too many peo-
ple practicing Falun Gong at once," Sun said.
In addition to the, local Ann Arbor chapter,
students at the University have formed the
Falun Gong Practice Group, which meets once
a week through the winter.
Rackham student Wei Wu said he believes
practicing Falun Gong makes him a more
focused student.
"I've been doing it now for more than two
years,' Wu said.
"For students, the time schedule is really
hectic, but Falun Gong helps you clear your
mind," he said. "If you can keep a clear mind,
you can do anything."

STUDENTS
Continued from Page 1A
happens in Florida and the possibil-
ity that Vice President Al Gore
could win the popular vote but lose
the Electoral College has made him
disillusioned with the system.
"I don't really care, I don't partic-
ularly have strong feelings for either
candidate," Kallon said.
Many students do not deny the
importance of this historic election
but remain critical towards the
media's treatmientuofthe election.
"It's a shame- that-it's taken up so
much of the media's attention that
we've forgotten that there are lots
of things going on in the world

right now," Social Work student
Carrie Gorga said.
Gorga said she is disappointed that
news services are neglecting to dis-
cuss possible voting problems in
states other than Florida.
"They've totally ignored the rest
of the country," she said, arguing that
there are disenfranchisement issues
the media has neglected.
Gorga described the events in
Florida as a "circus," saying that
she believes M\hile the electiosn is
important she does not understand
the need for 24-hour coverage.
"We've got a whole other month
until somebody is sworn in, so I
don't see what's the rush," Gorga
said.

's

=-I 0 IL ,'

EDUCATION MAJORS: over 60 credit
hours, with 12 credits in early childhood or
nated field. Please call Jill at Dexter
imunity Schools. 426-5530.

GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTORS - All
levels- Experience and own transportation
ded. Evening classes - Interview now.
America (734) 971-1667.
HAVE A SAFE AND
HAPPY HOLIDAY SEASON !
HAFROM WAY BAKERY
HOW DOES NICOTINE AFFECT YOUR
BRAIN?
Non-pregnant female and male tobacco
smokers needed for a PET study conducted in
Jan. and early Feb. 2001. Healthy, drug free
subjects aged 18-45 will be given a free
medical workup first and then scheduled for a
morning study which will run from about
7:30 am to 11:30 am after overnight tobacco
abstinence. A safe medically approved.
*oactive tracer will be given by injection
Z samples of blood withdrawn. Pay of
$300 will be given upon completion of the
study . Call 763-6672 or email lisong
@umich.edu, and leave your name, telephone
number and times when you can be reached.
IMMEDIATE INCOME Opportunity.
Make money while attending college, serious
inquiries only. 734-913-2184.
KABOB PALACE: Restaurant seeking F/T
and P/T positions. Waitress, Mon.-Sun.
Various shifts. (734) 327-4871 or
* 3) 350-6331 ask for Moe.
LAWYER'S CLUB dining is now hiring for
lunches and weekends only. $8.25-$9.15/HR.
TO START + FREE MEAL. Catering
opportunities & flex. sched. Apply in person
@ Lawyer's Club. 551 S. State St.
Call 764-1115.

MANAGEMENT positions avail. Great
resume builder, good money. Now accepting
applications. www.collegepro.com
888-277-7962.
MICHIGAN TELEFUND Now hiring
students for flexible night and weekend
schedules. Fun work atmosphere and great
job experience. Up to $8/hr. plus nightly
bonuses. Apply online or stop by 611
Church, Suite 4F. www.telefund.umich.edu
998-7420.
NEED A PART TIme job? Phone help &
drivers wanted, Earn $8-12/hr. Use your car
or ours. Bell's Pizza. 995-0232.
NEED DOG WALKER. 3 days/wk. Call
Susan 761-1392.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT for chemically
sensitive woman. Therapeutic bodywork &
daily living. Non-smoker, no perfumes. P/T
or F/T. All shifts. SW A2 area. 327-4923.
SCOREKEEPERS is now hiring part-time
short order cooks. No experience necessary.
310 Maynard. 995-0100.
TEACHING Opportunities: A NAEYC
accredited center now accepting applications
for the following positions: *After school
teacher 3-6pm., $9.50/hr *Teacher assistant
F/T $9.50/hr. Call 994-1150.
WORK STUDY STUDENTS are needed
for several office positions at Student
Publications. We're looking for punctual,
energetic students for assisting with some or
all mail, phones, filing, cash receipts, library,
database coordination, classified paste up and
advertising tear down. Various hours
available. Pay $8- per hour. Call Ava
Richard for information at 764-0550, 210E
Student Publications.

*** FREE Spring Break Trips *** Book
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Acapulco
Bahamas.
Florida
ft -- , STAT..
Mhgan Union C Gand Amr
323-937.1150
3~ T 734.769.2555

TIS' THE SEASON TO BE GENEROUS!
The Michigan Daily is holding a food drive
this holiday season. If you would like to
help someone in need, bring your cads to
420 Maynard, 2n'd floor , until Tuesday,
Dec. 12. All food will be donated to the Food
Gatherers of Ann Arbor. Any questions can
be directed to 763-3246.

1w800-648-4849
www.ststrovel. corn

on c.pe. UsU.
Nid Brger 734)222-1017
ic Dubo)% (734222.0528
Rachel Ga4rmn 734)222.0981

t :'~

PhDs, MBAs, and JDs
Management position in
Biotech R&D co. near campus.
Executive project manager of
Cuting-edge drug delivery
Science background not required: v'
Part-time now; full time in May.
LOTS OF POTENTIAL.
Fax: (734)665-0642
Email: becohan@umich.edu

$ $ '1 $q5
wnn
Turs . .

child care
BABYSITTER NEEDED some Saturdays.
Call Kahita or Leland 734-741-7223.

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from $99 per person
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resort the "fun place"!
Home of the world's

The last
Michigan Daily
Classified publication
is December 13.

ENERGETIC childcare provider needed in
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- LAKE FRONT: 2bdrm., Indry., to share
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