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November 30, 2000 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



- he Michigan Daily keekend, etc. Magazine - ursday, November 30.2

0 ~ '-".

:. .o

I

Did

I

really wear that?

A backward glance
at 1980s fashion

By Caitlin Friedemann
, Daily Arts Writer
The '80s were a decade of fabulous
fashion and extreme glamour. Runwav
shows featured everything from berets
and dark eyeliner to huge permed hair-
styles and power suits.
But how did this trickle down to
affect the fashion sense of millions of
American children wxio gtew up dur-
ing the '80s?
"Leggings and big sweatshirts!
exclaimed LSA sophomore Aimce
Niebuhr.
Of course this outfit would not be
cooplete without two pairs of different
colored socks or some ilegwarners.
Leggings were definiteiv a staple, and
they came in the full '80s palate
from black to hot pink, electric blue
and neon green. In hotter weather. they
looked really radical with a T-shirt ticd
at the side.
"I had this one shirt that said Partv

Time' and it was hot pink and black
with a picture of a girl deciding what
to wear," LSA sophomore Louisa
Kennedy said.
What girl could ever forget multi-
ples, those awesome three-piece out-
fits of leggings, a long T-shirt and a
wide fabric belt?
For the lucky ones who had their
ears pierced, big hoop earrings were
the fad, with a side ponytail or crimped
or feathered hair (perfection was
achieved with a crimped side pony-
taiW). To complete the female outfit, a
pair of running shoes, preferably a pair
of leather high tops, was a require-
ment. One could judge a person by
whether their high tops were Reebok
or LA Gear.
Boys were also judged by this
"sneaker standard," and most guys also
owned neon shoelaces to go with their
shoes. Many wore Zubaz, those zebra-
striped or crazy-patterned pants.
"The girls loved my matching sweat

suits, LSA freshman Jon Schwartz
said.
If one did decide to wear jeans, how-
ever,. Girbaud were the only option.
Boys had a wide range of tops to
choose from. "I used to wear a big
leather vest that I thought was the
height of coolness,' said LSA sopho-
more Joey Litman.
Hard-rock band T-shirts were cool,
and anything Hvpercolor (it changed
color with the temperature) was also
very popular. Crew cuts spiked with a
pound of gel or hairspray completed
the look for boys.
Although they did not progress as
far as Madonna's spandex, denim and
lace ensembles or Billy Idol's mohawk
and ripped clothing, children's attire
during the '80s definitely went to the
extremes of neon color and bad taste.
"At the time I felt like a rock star,
but now when I look back. I kind of
shudder;' L.SA sophomore Liz Herek
said.

EVOLUTION
OF THE SLAP

BRACELET

i

'

F.. .
.': :X . .. C
n
T y
r:

"

11 1

::. <;

,,

U U

\ [Welcomes
A UM Major Events / Division of Student Affairs presentation

ROAN
DAVID WILCOX
!TACEY EARLI
WEIAVUMANIA
cups! IUHAI!s

TUOMPION
TODD lNIDER
ODE "ON OHI
CONNIF KAtDOD &
miff RATROB.L'

Photm -s i: on JEssJCA JOHNSON Do
90s, slap bracelae l
appeared on the fashion
radar of elementary school
kids across the country.
These bracelets gained
popularity by combining
the features of a toy with
those of an accessory.

-V

",' :,
,r

v
T~ICKETS OW O OD Detroit Edison
fyt II4L ~foundation
h. undastA~tIet CROWANE PLAZA .
Phone M 3 IKTS A N N g R 6 o R Kokov@I40 !stand Enterprises

rriaay, uecember 1ana aturaay, December 2, LUIUU
Rackham Hall Amphitheatre, 915 E. Washington Street, Ann Arbor, MI
Over the course of the 20th century, the average age of death in the U.S. increased from the mid-40s to the
mid-70s. New scientific discoveries now open the possibility of dramatic extensions of longevity in the 21st
century. Explore the social and ethical implications of these new possibilities December 1 and 2 at the
University of Michigan.
Conference Speakersr

4MONDAYS
FOOTBALL
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TUESDA YS
1 FOR 1 DRY
WEDNESDAYS
CONTIEST&
WAITRGSS
REVIEW
THURSDAYS
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>~FRILLY DAY
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NIGHT
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y .SHO WGIRL
* 2 SUaNDNE &
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YOUR
8/RTHOAY &
BACHELOR
- "PARfYPtACE!

Lee C. Bollinger, President, University of Michigan
Robert A. Burt, J.D., Alexander M. Bickel Professor of Law,
Yale University.
Richard A. Miller, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Pathology and
Research Scientist, Institute of Gerontology, University of
Michigan
Robert N. Butler, M.D., President of the International
Longevity Center, Professor of Geriatrics at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, New York, and Founding Director,
National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of
Health.
David Rothman, Ph.D., Bernard Schoenberg Professor of
Social Medicine and Director, Center for the Study of
Society and Medicine, Columbia University College of
Physicians & Surgeons.
Andrew Delbanco, Ph.D., Julian Clarence Levi Professor in
the Humanities at Columbia University.

To Register
-Visit our website at
www.lifesciences.umich.edu/values/
events.html
iEmail lsvspl@umich.edu
Call 734-647-4571
The conference is free and open to the public, but
space is limited, so register today!

_

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