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November 05, 1999 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-05

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily -- Friday, November 5, 1999 -- 7

Taking a deep bet

'Final Four' renamed to
avoid sex discrimination

By Marta Brill
Daily Staff Reporter
The term "Final Four" will no longer be used to
describe the men's portion of the NCAA basketball tour-
nament due to the increasing popularity of the women's
final four tournament, NCAA officials recently decided.
Traditionally, the athletic world has used the term
"Final Four" as shorthand for the men's basketball cham-
pionship tournament. The women's equivalent was called
the "Women's Final Four," suggesting that it was sec-
ondary to the men's tournament, said Percy Bates, a fac-
ulty representative to the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics at its monthly meeting yesterday'.
Although there was opposition from officials outside
the University to continue calling the men's tournament
the Final Four, the University was strongly behind the
NCAA's decision.
"The men's final four will be referred to as the Men's
Final Four. The women's final four will be referred to as
the Women's Final Four," Bates said.
In situations where the reference to the tournament is
not related to gender, the generic term "Final Four" will
be used, Bates said, addressing trademark and merchan-
dise concerns.
Board members discussed this NCAA decision and
several other issues regarding gender, including the
University's progress on Title IX requirements. Title IX
is the federally mandated act that has forced universities
and other federally funded institutions to enact gender-
Law schoolh
panel ofgradu

equal practices.
"Our position as it relates to gender is to take a lead-
ership role and make opportunities available f 0r, women
athletes at the University of Michig~an," Athletic
Director Tom Gloss said.
The University is using the maximum numer ofCV
scholarships provided for women's athletics. (Go> "said
But the University needs to continue making progres s in
the way of paying women's athletic coaches a salary
equal to men's athletics coaches.
The disparity between the salaries of men's sports
coaches and women's sports coaches, (Goss said, is i
result of the high market price for mecn's football atnd-
basketball coaches. All salaries are based on tenure. pcr-M
formance and the market for the sport.
The travel budget, facilities, tutoring opportunities,.
publicity and recruitment budget.,(loss said, are appro-,
priated in equal amounts for men's and women's sports.
The Athletic Department requires each team to hate at
goal number of players. This practice is called roster
management and women's teams have a higzher <goal'
number of players.
The board members also discussed the Athletic-
Department's ongoing search for a women's waterpolo
coach. The search committee is now interviewing candi-
dates on the west coast - which the Athletic Department*
feels is the strongest region in the nation for the sport.
"We feel very confident that we will get a very good ,
waterpolo coach,"(oss said.
sts ONLINE
Continued from Page 1
O'Keefe added that enhai ncing tcch-
nology to courses can offer teaching
teopportunities unavailable in tai
"t s tional classroomn atmospheres.
. Manv of the faculty are convinced
you get better results," she said.-
wide and various "They help in getting shy students to
bNe as a U of M participate and allow instructors
hoof development more time to devote to class,"''
aid. O'Keefe added.
nd will have the Amidst the technological advances:.
rabout careers in the University is undertaking, some
yer's career can be question whether the online academic -
xperienccs, Ponce route leaves the human interaction skill i
on the wayside.
to know yourself, LSA senior Jennifer Ellison, who
easier to figure out is taking two online courses at EMU,
xhat path to take;' said online courses have in fact
helped her appreciate her Internet
Beale, a Duke classmates. "It's more personal
of Law faculty because you get to really see how a
d in the 6th Circuit person thinks," Ellison said. ,l
he Ofic oftheunderstand how they see the world."
1in the U.S. But O'Keefe insists that both'
ic and has experi- forums, technological and personal.
the U.S. Supreme must be included to provide a quality
learning experience.

DAVID ROCHfKtNDDaily
University alums Cynthia Gormley (front) and ay ame erform breathing exercises yesterday as part of an intro-
duction to kum-nye, a bioenergetic physical moveenttecNique at the Inter-Cooperative Council Education Center.

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jThe Milenni

By Charles Chen
Daily Staff Reporter
Law students will have the opportu-
nity to learn about different career pos-
sibilities when a panel of University
Law School graduates conduct a dis-
cussion titled, "The Roads We've
Traveled," which will take place tomor-
row at 10 a.m. in 250 Hutchins Hall.
The discussion is part of the Law
School class of 1974's 25th reunion
celebration this weekend. The alums
want to tell their class members and
University students about what they
have been doing in their careers.
The discussion will include five pan-
elists, all members of the class of 1974.
Among them wvill be former
"Newshour with Jim Lehrer" national
correspondent Phil Ponce, who will act
as moderator for tomorrow's discus-
sion.
"We want to share our experiences
of what led each of us down a certain
path," Ponce said.
Ponce was asked to moderate the
discussion because of his current posi-
tion as host of "Chicago Tonight," a
nightly news analysis program that
airs on WTTW Channel 11 in
Chicago.
While the discussion has been
planned for the alumni, the panel will
open the event to current University
Law and undergraduate students.
"We feel law students and under-
grads could benefit from this. We want

people to know the
opportunities availal
Law grad," Law Sc
officer Anne Dutia s
Those who atter
opportunity to hear
law and how a lawy
influenced by life e
said.
"It is importanta
which will make it c
your interests and m
he said.
Panelist Sarah
University School
member, has clerkec
Court, served in t'
Solicitor General
Department of Justii
ence arguing before
Court.
Daniel Reidy, wh+
Jones, Day, Reav
Chicago, also will b
row. He is a former
whose experience
included defending
cutors charged in;
accusing them of pai
ing a man for mnurdc
Ponce is no long
but he said his deg
him as a journalist.
"My law degree1
the work I do,' Pon(i
he will talk about ch
"learning about you

to is a partner with
vis & Pogue in
ae speaking tomor-
federal prosecutor
as a lawyer has
two former prose-
a conspiracy case
irticipating in fram-
er.
ger practicing law,
ree is a benefit to
gives credibility to
cc said, adding that
anging careers and
irself'"

Officials ask to lift
charter school cap

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LANSING (AP) - Uniformed
schoolchildren and charter school
advocates brought letters and draw-
ings to the Capitol yesterday, urging
lawmakers to lift the limit on the
number of charter schools in the state.
The 1993 law allowing charter schools
limited the number of charters that can
be granted by universities to 150. The
state now has 50,0000 students in 173
charter schools, including 150 granted by
universities and 23 granted by public
school systems and other entities.

Dan Quisenberry, president of the
Michigan Association of Public
School Academies, said it was fair
for the Legislature to put the cap in
place six years ago because charter
schools were an experiment. The
schools use public money but allow
administrators to develop their own
curriculum.
But Quisenberry said there are more
than 100 applicants hoping to get char-
ters, most relying on universities to
grant them.

pcorn
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VOTERS
Continued from Page 2.
"By delivering ballots to people ... it
does make it easier and usually does
increase voter turnout, said Michael
Traugott, chair of the University's com-
munications studies department.
Absentee ballots currently are avail-
able to voters with certain circum-
stances - illness, voters more than 60
years old or those out of town on elec-
tion day.
But "vote-by-mail is a universal
absentee ballot," Smith said. The bill
would allow anyone who wanted one to
have an absentee ballot.
A vote-by-mail system already is in
use in Oregon and has increased voter
turnout by about six percent, Traugott
said, adding that the increase was not
partisan.
Traugott said the study of the effects
o.f vnr-hvm i was condu~cted lin

opposed to the vote-by-mail system.
In 1997, a similar bill was introduced
by Sen. Loren Bennett (R- Canton),
SB 7, that would have made voting by
mail possible, said Scott Ray, a leg-
islative aid to the senator. But
because Bennett has not yet seen the
specific provisions of Smith's bill,
Ray said he was unable to comment
on SB 41.
Other Republicans expressed support
for a bill that would increase voter
turnout.
"Sen. Hammerstrom would do
anything to increase voter turnout,"~
said Amy Zaagman, Hammerstrom's
chief of staff. But it is "very impor-
tant that we have one voter file in
the state" to reduce voter fraud, she
added.
But Smith said that she does not
think the state legislature will take up
the bill because the state congress is
Repuiblican-controlled. "Their concern

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