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September 15, 1999 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Wednesday, September 15, 1999 - The Michigan Daily -17

i

1I' stickers ranked after disappointing losses

M cheKern
'Spot Wnter
With its 3-0 loss to No. 8 James
adison on Sunday, the Michigan field
ckey team fell to 3-3 on the season.
ite its record, the team was
n No. 12 in the first STX/NFHCA
oaches Poll of the season released yes-
rday. The high ranking can be attrib-
ed mostly to a difficult early-season
hedule in which the Wolverines faced
ur teams ranked in the top 20.
All three of Michigan's losses have
me against opponents currently
nked in the top 10. The Wolverines'
te victory against a top 20 opponent
me at No. 13 Ball State on Sept. I.
" time you play really good teams,
o makes you better for the rest of
e season," assistant coach Tracey
ichs said. "We came across two very
fferent styles of teams this weekend.
ne was really, really fast and skilled,
d the other was really aggressive and
mped us off of the ball"
Four other Big Ten teams were also
iked in the top 15, including No. 1
nn State. And since only one team

from the Big Ten can advance to the
NCAA tournament, the Wolverines
know that they will have their work cut
out for them this season.
"The Big Ten is a real strong confer-
ence," junior midfielder Regan
Wulfsberg said. "Every team is a good
team. Every game is very important,
especially if we want to get into the
(NCAA) Tournament."
The Wolverines know that they are
better than their record shows, and hope
to show that in their game this weekend.
"We had a pretty upsetting weekend,"
sophomore forward Laura Stinson said,
"but we played well against Virginia,
and I think we'll be ready for
(Syracuse). We need to go hard to every
single ball, and really try to outwork our
opponent."
The Wolverines also know that it is
important that they play well against
Syracuse and build some momentum
for the Big Ten season, starting next
Wednesday with No. II Michigan
State.
"Hopefully we can turn it around and
get a good win on Sunday and see if we

have improved the things that we have
been working on this week," Fuchs said.
FAR FRESHMEN: During the last few
weeks, Michigan's highly touted fresh-
man class has lived up to its billing,
accounting for nearly a fourth of the
team's points this season. The freshman
have been led by Jessica Rose, whose
eight points put her among the top scor-
ers on the team.
"We have a small team, and they've
really stepped up and done what they
needed to do" sophomore goalkeeper
Maureen Tasch said. "Everybody is ful-
filling their role on the team, and the
freshmen are part of it."
The Wolverines also know that it is
important for the freshman to gain
experience both to prepare them for
big games this season and for the
future.
"It's still an adjustment, and they are
still learning," Fuchs said. "All four of
them are seeing action, not maybe full
games, but they are getting some good
quality minutes. Hopefully by the end
of the season, they'll be feeling like
sophomores."

STX/NFHCA Coaches
Poll
Team Record
1. Penn State (26) 4-0
2. Old Dominion (2) 4-1
3. North Carolina 4-1
4. Maryland 4-1
5. Virginia 4-0
6. Connecticut 3-0
7. Ohio State 4-0
8. James Madison 3-1
9. Wake Forest 5-0
10. Iowa 5-0
11. Michigan State 4-1
12. MICHIGAN 3-3
13. Ball State 4-2
14. New Hampshire 4-0
15. Princeton 1-0
16. Kent State 4-2
17. Boston Univ. 2-1
18. Boston College 3-1
19. Massachusetts 2-2
20. Delaware 2-1

Ashley Thomas and the Michigan field hockey team have struggled through a dif-
ficult early-season schedule, and their record sits even at 3-3.

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Floyd juggles sports schedules

I

MIAMI (AP) - From South Florida
to the Grand Strand, Hurricane Floyd's
march up the Atlantic coast sent sports
teams scrambling Tuesday to adjust their
schedules and get out of the massive
storm's path.
No major games were affected, but
the potential for high wind and heavy
rain led NASCAR to close its headquar-
ters and forced the Miami Dolphins to
bus the final 100 miles back from its
season-opening victory at Denver.
"It just kind of puts a little bit of fear
in you, to say this is serious and you
can't relax," NASCAR spokesperson
Tim Sullivan said from Charlotte, N.C.,
where several employees relocated for
the week.
The Florida Panthers' opening NHL
exhibition game Tuesday night was
postponed. Baseball's Class-A Carolina
League, rather than play the deciding
game of its championship series,
declared Wilmington and Myrtle Beach
co-champions.
"Sports pales to other issues that are
at hand, even a championship," Myrtle
Beach general manager Steve Malliet
said.
The Double-A Southern League, with
Orlando and West Tennessee battling for
the title, moved Wednesday's Game 3
from Orlando to Jackson, Tenn. Games
4 and 5; if necessary, will be played
Friday and Saturday in Orlando.
Floyd didn't affect racing at Miami's
Calder Race Course, which doesn't run
on Tuesdays, but several owners and

trainers moved their horses to safer
ground. In Orlando, the NBA postponed
Wednesday's grand-opening celebration
of its first theme restaurant.
In the oddest twist, Floyd's approach
prompted a mistrial in the lawsuit
against Charlotte Hornets owner George
Shinn by a woman who said he sexually
assaulted her at his home.
Floyd's top sustained wind Tuesday
reached 140 mph - down slightly from
Monday but still a Category 4 storm, the
second-most powerful designation for a
hurricane.
Tropical storm-force winds, at least
39 mph, began hitting southeastern
Florida by early afternoon. At 5 p.m.
EDT, Floyd was about 190 miles east of
Palm Beach and moving northwest.
The Dolphins, fresh off a 38-21 tri-
umph Monday night that ended
Denver's 24-game home winning streak,
were forced to land at Fort Myers on
Florida's west coast and bus some 2 1/2
hours across the state.
Coach Jimmy Johnson canceled his
weekly day-after-game press briefing,
and team officials postponed cere-
monies opening a new NFL youth cen-
ter in Fort Lauderdale.
Neither : the Dolphins nor the
Jacksonville Jaguars were forced to can-
cel practice, since Tuesday is a day off
for most NFL teams.
The Jaguars had considered moving
practices to Georgia this week, but
backed off that idea Tuesday. However,
Wednesday's scheduled workouts

remained iffy.
The Florida Marlins, forced to play
back-to-back doubleheaders last year
when Hurricane Georges passed near,
watched developments this time from
San Francisco.
"It's hard to concentrate when you're
dealing with stuff like that," said catch-
er Mike Redmond, whose girlfrieind
lives in Melbourne, Fla. "When youroa5
thousand miles away, it makes youagjd,.
vous."
Farther north, colleges in Georgia
and South Carolina called off a handful
of games. Most involved volleyball and
soccer, but it also included Saturday
football game featuring The CitadQ at
Western Carolina.
Citadel athletic director Walt Nadzak
said memories of Hurricane H
which left some $7 billion in damage ]
years ago, led him to pull the plug early.
"I know Western doesn't understand,"
Nadzak said. "But our kids have fami-
lies, our coaches have wives and citi-l$
dren. We want them to be with them""2
Other teams, meanwhile, adjusted
their schedules to accommodate'thast
storm. Eighth-ranked Miami; preparing
for Saturday's game-against No. 3 Pennk'
State, and Central Florida both movedp
up practice to avoid the fiercest weathef.
It's tricky," said Miami quarterbackrni
Kenny Kelly, who hit the practice fields
at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. "You never knew
what tomorrow's schedule is goingotaf
be. We'll play and see what happekaoro ,
tomorrow."

AP PHnTs
running back James Jackson and the rest of the Hurricanes are dealing with a nasty version of their namesake as
ne Floyd threatens to preempt their game with Penn State this Saturday.

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managelent consutants
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that advises senior management of the
world's leading organizations on some of
the most challenging and complex issues
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University of Michigan Ph.D. students,
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