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November 04, 1999 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-04

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 4, 1999 - 7A

Saint's bones visit E

I

JEREMY MENCIK/Daily
Gurus Colvin, a junior at Eastern Michigan University, speaks about environmental issues in Angell
Hall last night as part of Islamic Awareness Week.

ISLAM
Continued from Page 1A
Stockwell Residence Hall from 2 to 3 p.m.
Students also can visit MSA's Jeopardy board
near the Fishbowl in Angell Hall through
tomorrow. The purpose of the board is to edu-
cate students about Islam and Muslims. Also
morrow, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Angell Hall
ud. C, Rami Nashashibi, a community activist
from Chicago, will be speaking at an event
titled "Confronting Poverty: An Islamic
Perspective."
"We want to gain exposure on campus,"
Bengali said. "We want people to see what we
do in prayer."
LSA first-year student Sameer Hossain
attended last night's presentation with expecta-
tions that the event would also "improve non-
i4uslims' understanding of what we do through-
out the year"
"We want others to be aware of what we do,

which includes praying five times each day,"
Hossain said.
Efforts to increase awareness extend beyond
this week's events. Colvin said that Islam is a
religion that is available to all people, not only
Muslims. "Islam is a social religion that facili-
tates a social purpose," he said.
The Arab Community Center for Economic
and Social Services has also been active in cre-
ating awareness of environmental issues
throughout the local Muslim community.
Public Health student Monazzah Akbar said,
"We want to inform communities of Muslims of
what's happening to the environment in the
world."
The students' efforts have focused on assist-
ing Muslim communities in the Dearborn area
by educating families about environmental haz-
ards, Akbar said.
The goal of Islam Awareness Week is "to
inform people of what we believe and hope that
they become more interested," Bengali said.

ROYAL OAK, Mich. (AP) - Thousands Italy, Brazi
gathered yesterday here to view the sacred YesterdaN
bones of a French Carmelite nun called "the tures outsi
saint for the next millennium" by Pope John for the cho
Paul 11. plexiglasss
The relics of St. Therese of Lisieux were on "When's
display for 16 hours at a parish named in her channels o
honor - the National Shrine of the Little Monsignor
Flower. Shrine.
The relics, encased in a box of jacaranda Busloads
wood and gilded silver, are on a world tour that Canada, Pe
included a Kent County stop Tuesday at a Shrine, wh
Carmelite monastery in Parnell. the nation'
The relics are scheduled to visit the memory of
Carmelite Monastery in Terre Haute, Ind., sis in 1897
today. Tom Ry;
St. Therese's relics, which are traveling parish. His
across the country through Jan. 28, already opened afte
have drawn huge crowds in Russia, Austria, "What sI
Rep. warns of
need to reform
SocialeCurit
WASHINGTON (AP) - A Michigan representative
warned yesterday that Social Security must be fixed now or
Americans will need to pay another S120 trillion in the next
75 years to maintain the troubled retirement system.
"We need to make up S120 trillion more ... to pay benefits
over the next 75 years ... if we don't step up and change this
program," Rep. Nick Smith (R-Addison) said at a Capitol
Hill news conference with several other House lawmakers to
introduce his bill to overhaul Social Security.
Congress and President Clinton have been unable to agree
on how to overhaul the politically sensitive program. And
with the presidential and congressional elections only a year
away, there have been dwindling signs of progress on any
initiative to fix Social Security.
Republican House leaders said they viewed Smith's bill as
a way to help galvanize discussion about the issue during the
election year and start the debate about how to best fix the
program.
"We can't do it in Congress alone, we understand that. But
we can make a beginning. We can introduce the ideas," said
Rep. Dick Armey (R-Texas) the House Majority Leader.
In the past five years, Smith has introduced several bills
to keep Social Security solvent, one of his top legislative pri-
orities. He recently was chair of a House legislative task
force on the issue.
This time in refining his proposal further, he picked up
support from seven cosponsors who include a Democrat,
Rep. Charles Stenholm of Texas.
Trustees predict that without changes, the fund will pay
out more than it takes in by 2012 and go broke in 2029. The
Social Security Administration says Smith's proposal will
keep the retirement system solvent for at least 75 years.
Smith's bill would allow workers to channel some of their
payroll tax into worker retirement accounts invested in the
stock market. Employees would have the option of having a
personal retirement savings account to invest roughly half of
the 6.2 percent Social Security payroll tax they pay on their
salaries.
Social Security was designed in 1935 as a pay-as-you-go
system. In 1950, there were 17 workers per retiree to support
it; today, there are only three. And the ratio will get worse as
the Baby Boom generation starts to retire in 2010.
The stock market traditionally has generated a much higher
rate of return on long-term investment - about 7 percent.

STUDY JAPANESE
IN ToKYO!,
The Waseda/Oregon Transnational Program, January 11- June
23, 2000, is a comparative US-Japan Societies study program that
offers three levels of Japanese language instruction and thematic
humanities/social science courses that mix US-based and regular
Waseda students together in the classroom at Waseda University in
Tokyo, Japan. Scholarships up to $1,000 are available. For more
information, contact:
Waseda/Oregon Programs at (800) 82397938,
info@opie.org, or www.opie.org.

i and Argentina.
y, people stood in freezing tempera-
de the church for more than an hour
ance to step inside and touch the
surrounding the relics.
the last time a saint was on all the
of the I1 o'clock news?" asked
William Easton, pastor of the
s of Roman Catholics came from
nnsylvania, Ohio and Illinois to the
ich was founded in 1926 as one of
's first parishes dedicated to the
fSt. Therese, who died oftuberculo-
at age 24.
an has been a lifelong part of the
parents were members when it re-
er a firein 1936.
he did was bring inspiration and the

iamesake
evidence of that is how the public relates to her
100 vcar after her death;' Ryan said.
St. Therese, also known as "the Little Flower
of Jesus" because of her love of flowers,
became known worldwide for her autobiogra-
phy "Story of a Soul," that described her devo-
tion to God.
She was canonized by Pope Pius XI in 1925.
The late Mother Teresa of Calcutta took her
name and said that she was inspired by her to
serve the poor in India.
At a morning Mass, a standing-room only
crowd of more than 3,000 packed the Shrine.
which was decorated with photographs of St.
Therese in various stages of her life.
Eight members of the Knights of Columbus
carried the relics around the center of the sanc-
tuary while people frantically reached out to
touch the glass.

ONLINE
Continued from Page 1A
community colleges throughout the state.
Deborah White, MVU director of communi-
cation and public relations, said students
e olled in one of the colleges are eligible to
t the whatever courses each of the 17
schools offers online.
"This is just another way to help students learn,"
Hudson said.
Derby said the flexibility of the courses is con-
venient for her schedule. "Before the online cours-
es were available, it was very difficult to take
cusses, Derby said.
But Derek Wallace, an EMU senior living in
Kansas City, Mo. taking online classes, said the
Itersity's online courses are not tailored for

working students.
"The assignments that they were asking for
were too long and way to much for me to do,"
Wallace said. "I'll probably never do this again."
Students interested in furthering their academic
pursuits via the Internet can go the way of LSA
senior Jennifer Ellison: She is taking African
American Theater and Introduction to Women's
Studies online through EMU.
Sally Lindsley, the University's assistant direc-
tor of undergraduate admissions in the College of
Literature, Science and Arts, said online course
credits from other schools transfer to the
University like any other class may transfer.
As long as the course is taught officially at a
university, and the University offers an equiva-
lent, a student can receive credit for an online
course.

MUSIKER TOURS AND SUMMER
DISCOVERY
SLMMER OPPORTUNITIES
C selors needed for our student travel
pttams And/or our pre-college enrichment
progratis Applicants must be 21 years old
b June 20. 2000.
We need:
'Mature
'Hardworking
*Energetic individuals who can dedicate 4-7
weeks this summer working with teenagers.
To receive an application or to find out more
information: Call (888)8SUMMER or
E-mail: jen@summerfun.com to set up an
uinei-nieu on November 19, 1999.
P/T OFFICE WORK. Flexible 20 hrs./wk.
Cgenn at Shaman [)rum 662-7407.
P/r OR F/T help wanted for woman's
clothing boutique in Kerrytown, very flexible
hours, good pay. Call Tara at 994-6659 or
994-5326
PETLAND IS NOW HIRING for
experienced Fish Keepers to assist customers
& maintain tanks. Full or part time. Friendly
eiwironiment. Pay commensurate with
cxpen ince Call 482-8993 & ask for Derek.
PHONE INTERVIEWERS needed for
market research company. No sales. flexible
schedulin good pay. Call 973-1329. ext. 56
College Grads
No experience needed!!
Earn up to 35K after 1 year
40K after 2 years
IMS, a biomedical software firm in
Silver Spring, MD, is offering
a free 4 week programmin course.
We hire 95% of students wo take
this course. Course starts 1/10. For
tails,see imsweb.com or call
8) 580-5057.
PLOWING, SUBCONTRACTING,
Shoveling. Our plow truck or yours. Full time
positions available or Seasonal, great 2nd
job, most work done between I 1pm and Bam.
Solid hourly pay plus extra production

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Transportation Research Institute seeks men
and women ages 18-35 and over 60 vrs. old
to participate in an automobile driver study.
The vehicle you normally drive must be a
passenger car and you must drive the vehicle
to the test facility in Ann Arbor. Testing will
consist of one measurement session lasting
approx. 1.5 hrs. Subjects will be paid S20 for
participatim, Call 975-8925 for more info.
WORK STUDY STUDENT NEEDED:
Assist staff by assembling packets. filing,
running errands & light lifting. 10-15 hours
per week. Qualifications: Good
organizational & time management skills.
works independently, pays attention to detail.
follows directions accurately, dependable &
punctual. Minimum of 2 hour blocks of time
during the M-F, 8-5 workday. Call Catherine
Philbin at 615-4859.
WRITERS WANTED NovelGuide.com is
now hiring talented writers. Writers will be
working on classic book summaries and are
well paid. Please call 248-882-7015 or email
jobs @ igdsolutions.com
YOUNG ADULTS WANTED!
High School or College.
Earn full time income part time.
Full Training. Call 517-523-7327.

EARLY SPRING BREAK specials! SPRING BREAK 2000.
Bahamas Party Cruise 5 Days $279! Mexico-Jamaica-S. Padre.
Includes Most Meals! Awesome Beaches. A local Travel Agency.
Nightlife! Panama City. Daytona. South Over 55 years expenence
Beach. Florida S129! springbreaktravel.com located in Nickel's Arcade.
1-800-678-6368 Boersma Travel. 994-6200
www.boersmatravel.com

SPRING BREAK 2000
The Millennium
..mr ' - a

1

#1 SPRING BREAK 2000 VACATIONS!
Book Early & Save! Best Prices Guaranteed!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas & Florida!
Sell Trips. Earn Cash, & Go Free!
Now Hiring Campus Reps!
I-800-234-7007
www.endlesssuinmertours.com
***ACT NOW! Call for the best Sprint
Break Prices! South Padre. Cancun.
Jamaica, Bahamas. Acapulco. Florida &
Mardi Gras. Reps needed...Travel Free. Earn
SSS. Discounts for 6+. 800-838-820'
www.leisuretours.com
4 NORTHWESTERN TICKETS Section
25 Row 13. Call David 747-6983.
EARN FREE TRIPS AND CASH!!!
SPRING BREAK 2000
*CANCUN* *JAMAICA*
For 10 years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinguished itself as the most reliable
student even and marketing organization in
North America. Motivated Reps can go on
Spring Break FREE & earn over
$$$$$ $10,000! $$$$$
Contact us today for details!
800/328-1509 www.classtravelinti.com
FREE TRIPS AND CASH!!'
SPRING BREAK 2000
StudentCitycom is looking for Highly
Motivated Students to promote Spring Break
2000! Organize a small group and travel
FREE!! Top campus reps can earn Free
Trip & over $10,000! Choose Cancun,
Jamaica or Nassau! Book Trips On-Line

BABYSITTER NEEDED for 9 yr. old girl
after school. Flex. sched., good pay. Car
needed. Call 668-1332.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for evenings and
weekends. Must have own car. Nonsmoker.
$7-8/hour. 665-6029.
CAREGIVER NEEDED, 30 hrs./wk.
Beginning Jan. 3 in our Ann Arbor home. 2
children, own car, references. Call 747-7513.
ISABELLE, 3 1/2, needs babysitter. I or 2
evenings per week. On Dexter. near Wagner.
$8/hr. Must have own transportation.
References checked. 764-8960.

Our drivers get paid a generous hourly wage, earn great tips and make extra
cash for every run. We're currently seeking Delivery Specialists at our Domino's
stores located at 342 S. State St. at Williams where delivery is coming soon!
We're also offering a $200 sign-on bonus for all new Delivery Specialists. You'll
receive $100 cash after your second day of work and anotheq5100 cash after
you have worked at Domino's for 30 days.
... M'l ... K f/ .._ .!{'AMA A/ " ' A S

I

LOVING ACTIVE caregiver needed after

r

I %.j 'P UCI3V1IA11

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