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December 13, 1999 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-12-13

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 13, 1999 - 3A

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19M

Markley resident
barricades self in
room to study
A student in Mary Markley Residence
Hall barricaded himself in his room
esday afternoon until the Ann Arbor
re Department and Department of
Public Safety officials arrived to remove
him, DPS Det. Wesley Skowron said.
According to Skowron, the student
wanted to finish a term paper and did not
want to be bothered. A resident adviser
who apparently misunderstood the seri-
ousness of the situation and took the stu-
dent to be suicidal, contacted police and
fire officials who "talked him out."
"He was a little embarrassed,"
&wron said.
Social Work prof.
emeritus dies
Jane Costabile died Nov. 23 at Glacier
Hills Nursing Center in Ann Arbor.
Costabile was a Social Work professor
emeritus, most recognized for her group
work and child welfare work.
Costabile assisted in the revision of
*State of Michigan Adoption Code of
1975. She also helped create policies for
subsidized adoptions.
Memorial donations can be sent to
the School of Social Work, the United
Way ;Qf Washtenaw County or Alma
College
Fint prof. on trial
or trespassing
lames Lupton, who teaches at the
elsity's Flint campus was arrested
Dec. 18 after refusing to leave the Ann
Arbor Post Office lobby while passing
out fliers decrying U.S. policy towards
Iraq
His trial began Friday at the
Washtenaw County Courthouse.
Lupton's fliers protested the refusal
of the post office to ship a package he
wanted to send to Iraqi children. The
q age contained Children's Tylenol,
ru bing alcohol and other medicines
that were meant to provide relief from
the recent bombing of Iraq, he said.
"The children of Iraq were dying
because my nation was illegally bomb-
ing them," Lupton said in his testimony
last Friday. "The post office was a place
where sanctions were enforced. I felt it
was my moral obligation to counter
those sanctions. I really felt I had no
upton said in his testimony that
officials told him he couldn't mail
the package unless it was a direct
persohal correspondence or if it was
heavier than 12 ounces. Lupton's
ackage was ineligible for mailing
n both accounts.
Post office officials repeatedly told
Lupton to pass out his fliers outside of
he building, but Lupton said he had no
ition ofleaving.
earborn to form
auto institute
The University's Dearborn campus
lans to establish an institute to help
evelop an entry-level car for emerging
markets which place a premium on recy-
lable parts.
The Institute for Advanced
Vehicle Systems - to be housed in
y 5,000-square-foot addition next
to the College of Engineering and
Computer Science -- will include
laboratories devoted to advanced
materials processing, vehicle
dynamics and electronic sensors.
Dearborn officials also plan to reno-
va and expand its science building,
which was constructed in 1959 and is

in need of electronic and mechanical
upgrades.
he 25,000-square-foot addition
wI house laboratories for cellular
and molecular biology, environmen-
tal science, earth and planetary sci-
ences.
Combined, both projects will cost
S36.9 million and take up to two years to
conplete. The University is building a
new structure for its College of Arts,
Science and Letters and is set to break
ground shortly on an Environmental
Interpretive Center along the Rouge
fr.
"We must raise $9 million from
the private sector for the Institute for
Advanced Vehicle Systems and relat-
edprojects, and we are calling on the
auto industry and related technical
and science disciplines," Ed Bagale,
Dearborn's vice-chancellor of gov-
ernment relations, told The Detroit
News.
- Compiledfrom staff and wire
reports.

Students
leave A2
By David Enders-
and Jaimie Winkler--
Daily Staff Reporters
Because a large part of Ann Arbor's
population leaves town for the holidays,'
residences on and off campus become
easy targets for thefts.7
"Students should be thoughtful when
preparing their rooms to leave,' said Alan
Levy; director of Housing Public Affairs.
Levy said limited access to the resi- A bicycle is elaborately wrapped with rop
dence halls provides little opportunity The University and local police agencies
for theft, which usually is low, during
the winter break. theft in residence halls is related to
Student identification cards, which unlocked doors," he said, referring to the
serve as keyless entry into residence biggest safety problem throughout the
halls, don't work during that period of year.
time, Levy said. Housing also provides Ann Arbor Police Department Sgt.
extra security during the break to watch Mike Logghe said the most common
for suspicious activity. items stolen are VCRs, CDs, computers
This new year presents an added and other electronics.
problem for security: There is a chance He suggested "hiding such objects or
of computer and electrical failures due taking them out of the house and leav-
to the millennium bug. ing them in the trunk of your car.
Extra security will be on hand during "At least lock everything up good,
the roll over period of Dec. 31 to Jan. 3 in and maybe leave a light on," he said.
case electrical locks fail, but "all of those Department of Public Safety Sgt.
systems have been checked," Levy said. Benny Chenevery, a crime prevention
Students can minimize millennium officer, said that thefts during the
malfunctions in their rooms by unplug- Thanksgiving break were down from
ging all electrical cords, shutting off last year, from 36 to 22.
and cleaning refrigerators, which "A lot of crimes on this campus are
Housing normally suggests for the long crimes of opportunity," Chenevery said.
break, Levy said. This season students To provide easier recovery of a bike or
should be extra careful to not rely on any lost item, Chenevery suggested
surge protectors to protect from electri- engraving the owner's drivers license
cal problems during the break. number into valuable objects.
"All of the students' experience with But the blames lies with landlords for
MSA: Student
coursepack servi-ce
not yetavibl

Seniors asked to

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SARA SCHENCK/aily
pes attached to a railing on Church Street.
urge caution during winter break.
thefts resulting from faulty windows,
locks and other security devices, espe-
cially if tenants report damaged equip-
ment to the landlord prior to the break-
in, said Ed Chusid, a tenant advocate for
the Ann Arbor Tenant's Union.
"Landlords have a responsibility to
keep the property reasonably secure. If
there was anything wrong ... you could
sue the landlord claiming the security
was insufficient,' Chusid said.
Check the condition of locks on win-
dows and doors before leaving for win-
ter break, he suggested.
"It really depends on the method of
entry," Chusid said. He explained that
in such cases, police reports and testi-
mony are the most helpful details.
He also said that grounds exist for a
suit if a landlord has multiple copies of a
tenant's keys "floating around" It is the
responsibility of the landlord to collect
old keys. Landlords are also required to
change locks to prevent access by
unwanted parties, Chusid said.

By Nika Schulte
Daily Staff Reporter
The School of Engineering Class of
2000 graduates are determined to leave
their mark on the University - right in
the middle of the North Campus
Engineering Diag near Lurie Bell Tower.
"Most class gifts in the past have been
scholarships and non-tangible things;,"
said Engineering class President Jon
Malkovich of the class' decision to
donate a replica of the Central Campus
Diag 'M'. "We wanted to make a long-
standing gift."
Donations for the Senior Gift are
being collected by Telefund, the
University's student-run program, which
solicits contributions from alumni by
phone on behalf of 10 schools including
LSA, College of Engineering and School
of Education.
Malkovich said the class officers
chose to designate a landmark as their
class gift because many current and
future students can enjoy it rather than a
few who would benefit from scholar-
ships. The 'M' design was chosen, he
said, because it serves to unite North and
Central campuses.
"One of the University's goals is to
create ties between North and Central
campuses. The block 'M' would subtly
connect the two," Malkovich said.
Development Officer for Annual
Giving Mary Penet said the Senior Gift
serves as a way for students to show their
appreciation for the University by mak-
ing a gift to their specific school.
"The money doesn't go into a black
hole," Penet said. "It goes back into their

school or college' she said.
In recent years, the money has been
used for scholarships and resources, such
as books for the libraries within the spe-
cific schools. Each school can designate
the money for specific projects, but so far
the College of Enginecnng is the only
one to designate a specific project,
Telefund Program Manager Jenny Veve
said.
Although Telefund does the bulk of its
Senior Gift collection efforts through a
calling drive in winter term after spring
break, organizers said they hope that
seniors graduating at the end of the term
will stop at Telefund's booth in the
Michigan Union this week.
At the booth Wednesday and Thursday
between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., seniors can
fill out or pick up pledge forms to make
a contribution.
"The University of Michigan is one of
the top public institutions in the nation
because we have an abundance of
resources." Veve said."If we don't main-
tain these resources, the value of the
degree diminishes."
Last year about 40 percent of graduat-
ing seniors donated to the $38,000 col-
lected for the Senior Gift, Veve said. Veve
said the goal for this year is $45,000.
Although Veve said she understands
students are not eager to donate after
writing out tuition checks for four years,
she said students should consider giving.
"We know they're poor. They're
seniors just staring to get out into work
force. We are just trying to get them going
on the theme of recycling opportunity,"
Veve said.

.a
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.44
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Executive officers
discuss status of MSA
current projects
By Jeannie Baumann
Daily Staff Reporter
The Student Coursepack Service
will not be available by next semester,
Michigan Student Assembly
President Bram Elias said.
"Both the administration and MSA
have more homework to do before we
bring the student coursepack service
back," he said. "The more we work on
it, the more complicated the issue
becomes."
Nevertheless, Elias said the service
will return.
"We have a commitment from the
administration to attempt to provide
affordable coursepacks for students,"
he said, adding that the administration
may take more control in the revised
SCS.
"MSA doesn't care how it gets done,
we just need to get it done," Elias said
"Sooner is better than later and any-
thing is better than none at all"
But as the fall semester comes to a
close, Elias and MSA Vice President
Andy Coulouris reflect upon what the
assembly has done this past semester
and how those efforts will carry into
the new year.
Elias said this particular assembly
worked closely with University
administration to update the Code of
Student Conduct, a project that MSA
has been working on for the past two
years.
"We're now in the process of offer-
ing the first-ever amendments to the
Code," he said. "It looks like we
might have finalized the process for
amending the code in the future."
Elias said the assembly has also
been involved in the hiring process
for a new director of the Office of
Student Conflict Resolution.
The assembly has also increased its
lobbying in Lansing,' particularly
addressing University budget
requests.
"I have a lot of faith in the rebirth
that MSA plays in lobbying the state
legislature," Coulouris said.
Elias expressed similar thoughts.
Former External Relations Chair
"Ellen Friedman did a really good
job, and we hope that (newly appoint-
ed ERC Chair) Peter Handler will be
able to build upon the foundation that

Ellen left for it," he said.
The assembly also pursued a
greater number of minority issues this
semester.
"We're working with students of
color on campus to address the bun-
dle of issues the community really
needs to see confronted before this
academic year is out," he said.
The assembly contributed in
amending the Michigan Union dance
policy, which had been accused of
discriminating and restricting black
and Latino/a events.
Elias said he hopes to work with
more administrative staff to address
further minority concerns. "It's all
centered around the larger issue that
the administration listens to and
respects students of color."
The Democracy Project, an effort
by MSA's Voice Your Vote Task Force
to spark civic engagement on campus,
launched a series of forums about
various legislative issues, such as the
gun control debate last month.
"Students don't talk about issues on
a meaningful basis, and our goal is to
fill that void as much as we can,"
Coulouris said.
Coulouris, one of the task force's
leaders, said the Democracy Project
organizers will host monthly forums
covering a variety of issues.
"We need issues that are accessible
to students and not too hard to grasp,"
he said, noting that the issues are to
be legislatively pertinent, so students
can write to their member of
Congress about the issues. Issue
mailings supplement these debates to
stimulate letter writing and make it
more accessible.
The next debate, scheduled for Jan.
19, is to address how the internation-
al community should deal with coun-
tries that have afflicted human rights
violations - whether through inte-
grating or boycotting these countries.
The assembly also distributed more
money to student groups this semes-
ter than any previous semester, with a
total of $149,550 allocated to296 stu-
dent groups through MSA's Budget
Priorities Committee and Community
Service Commission.
BPC Chair Glen Roe said this
semester is indicative of future
semesters, but there is still room for
improvement.
"We're trying a couple initiatives to
get student groups to come and get
their allocations," Roe said.

The Princeton Review
MCAT students
have an average score
increase of
8 points.
Classes begin
January 8!.
Call us today!

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THE
PRINCETON
REVIEW

1-800-2REVIEW
www.review.com

REGISTRAR'S BULLETIN BOARD

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Wolverine Access via the World Wide Web
http://waccess.umich.edu

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WINTER TERM CLASSES BEGIN THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2000

WINTER TERM
REGISTRATION

* Register or drop/add using Touch-Tone:

Call

8-1881 (on campus)

WITHDRAWAL
FROM
WINTER TERM
(DROP ALL
COURSES)

(734) 998-1881 (off campus)
Touch-Tone will be available over the Winter Break.
REGISTRATION TRANSACTIONS AVAILABLE THROUGH TOUCH-TONE:
INITIAL REGISTRATION for classes, ADD a course, DROP a course, SWAP a course
or sections of a course, MODIFY a course, WAITLIST a course, DISENROLL for all
courses prior to the first day of classes.
DROP/ADD for Winter 2000 will be available through TOUCH-TONE from your
appointment time through January 25th (except during scheduled maintenance). Access
CRISPINFO through Wolverine Access on the World Wide Web (under Student Business).
If you need to obtain an OVERRIDE for a class, you must 1) contact the department to
obtain an electronic override, AND 2) access Touch-Tone to process an add.
PLEASE NOTE: IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGENTS' POLICY, STUDENTS WHO
REGISTER AND SUBSEQUENTLY WITHDRAW AFTER THE BEGINNING OF
CLASSES WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE REGISTRATION AND
DISENROLLMENT FEES. THIS ASSESSMENT OF $130.00 FOR WINTER TERM
WILL BE MADE REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT YOU ATTEND
CLASSES.
If you wish to disenroll from Winter term and avoid all charges, you must do so by January
4, 2000. Either 1) send a letter to the University of Michigan, Office of the Registrar, 1524
L.S.A. Bldg., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382, requesting disenrollment from Winter term,
postmarked no later than January 4, 2000, OR 2) access Touch-Tone at (734) 998-1881
and at the menu press "7".
The dates to withdraw from Winter Term and pay only a $50 Disenrollment Fee and an $80
Registration Fee are January 5-25 (before the end of the first three weeks of classes).

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FALL TERM
GRADES
TERM GRADE
REPORTS

* Hear your grades on Touch-Tone: Call 8-1645 (on campus)
(734) 998-1645 (off campus)
* See your grades through Wolverine Access on the World Wide Web
Effective, Fall Term 1999, term grade reports will no longer be mailed to students.,
Students may hear their grades on touch-tone (998-1645), view their grades on
Wolverine Access. or order a transcrint or academic renort. Any student, who needs a

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