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November 30, 1999 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-30

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 30, 1999 - 7
ustices to rule on state law regarding hate crimes

Tic Baltimore Sun
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court,
gien a chance to shape the nation's laws against
hate- crimes, agreed yesterday to define state
power to impose added punishment for a crimi-
nal who is motivated by racial or religious bias.
Six years after its last ruling on the issue, the
ourt said it would decide the constitutionality
New Jersey law that gives a judge broad dis-
cretion to tack on heavier sentences when a
crime results from prejudice.
The coming decision does not appear likely to
deny states the power to pass hate crime laws,

said Steven Freeman, legal director of the Anti-
Defamation League, a leading proponent of
such laws. Rather, the justices will be sorting out
how difficult it will be to increase the penalties
when a crime results from bias against a minor-
ity individual or group.
In 1993, the court ruled in a Wisconsin case
that states may increase penalties for bias-moti-
vated offenses, saying such laws target primarily
actions and not thoughts or beliefs. The
Constitution generally bars punishment for one's
thoughts. But the 1993 decision left unanswered
the procedures that courts would have to follow

under those laws.
New Jersey was one of the first states to adopt
a hate crimes law, patterning its 1981 measure
after a proposal by the Anti-Defamation League.
Now, 39 other states have enacted laws similar to
the league's model.
In basic outline, those laws do not create a
separate offense of "hate crime" Rather, they
add to the length of sentences for crimes that are
found to have been motivated by racial, reli-
gious, ethnic or other discrimination.
New Jersey's law is somewhat unusual. The
judge, not the jury, decides whether the crime

was motivated by bias. In addition, the judge can
draw that conclusion based on the lowest stan-
dard of proof: that the evidence of bias simply
outweighs the evidence to the contrary.
In most other states, prosecutors must prove
beyond a reasonable doubt that the criminal was
motivated by discrimination.
The New Jersey Supreme Court, upholding
that state's law in June, said the Constitution
does not require the tougher standard of proof or
that the task be given to a jury. The extra pun-
ishment is not a specific part of the crime, but
only a sentencing factor, the state court ruled.

The law's constitutionality was challenged in an
appeal to the justices by Charles Apprendi, a phar-
macist in VinelandN.J., who asked the court to over-
turn his 12-year prison sentence under the state law.
Apprendi had been given a heavier pun-
ishment for the crime of possessing a gun
with an unlawful purpose. Prosecutors
accused him of firing shots into the home
of a black family living near him. Apprendi,
who is white, told the police who arrested
him that he committed the shooting to "give
them a message" that they were not wel-
come in the neighborhood.

Stalled budget ends in consensus

FfRE EXTINGUISHER service person. No
expo nec. 40+ hrs. Flex. schedule. Will use
our vehicle. Apply at State Secuunty Services
525 Church. Ann Arbor, 668-0444 EOE.
HEALTHY SUBJECTS, ages 18 - 50+. are
needed to work with medical students to
a,^ss their abdominal examination skills.
Inturested individuals will be trained to play
therole of an actual patient. Individuals will
receive approx. 12 hours of paid training and
gin hourly stipend. Individuals should be
aidable to work from 1:00-5:00 p.m. on
lost if not all of the following dates:
1/24/t), 1/28/00. 1/31/00, 2/2,00, 2/4/00.
21)/00. training will occur in mid-December
Ded carly January ) If you are interested in
poriiin\ mo a non- invasive patient case and
t kingi Stithl medical students, please call
Kc14 Pos/ywak. Standardized Patient
rnwram. (734) 615-2992.
HOW DOES TOBACCO SMOKING
AFFECT YOUR BRAIN?
Healthy male/fem. drug-free tobacco smkrs,
ages 18-50 needed for studying brain blood
tlow using a safe, short-lived radioisotope.
interested volunteers must not be on any
nonic medications or abused substances.
uitcipants areiven free medical work-ups
u.shcd Ii a mnorningW stuLdy in University
.hrttal. after ovCrni ht tobacco abstinence.
C(hm1714-647-8239 & leave name. telephone
tnunmber. % ~hen & where you can be reached.
Pahiv25(0 upon completion of the study
in"ol' n, about 5 hrs.
4 AWN MAINTENANCE crew
lcaders/inenbers wanted. 973-0930. Valid
Mithigan license needed.
.Lt"NCH SUPERVISOR needed 1.5 hrs./day
t 5s 75/hr. Involves monitoring elementary
ea.hool tudcnts in lunchroom and on
ai ground. Call Honey Creek Community
Xchool at 734-994-2636 for more into.
Madhits.com is seeking experienced Visual
asic iograimmers. Please submit resumes
in con fidence to esumeainadhits.com. Be
otuu of the Digital Music Revolution.
Madhits.com is seeking MBA students for
executive positions. Please submit resumes in
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of the Digital Music Revolution.
SMdhits.com is 'seeking seasoned graphical
carts Please submit esumes in con fidence
'resume (a'iadhits coifl Be pat oft the
miital Music Revolution.
MULTI-ETHNIC STUDENT Affairs is
ollring twko work study student positions for
morning and afternoon shifts. Contact Louise
Brooks at 763-9044.
NAED EXPERIENCE (and money?) Join a
fast fun and growing company as your
campus representative. Flexible hours.
responsihilities and competitive pay. No
expenence. just personality needed. Visit
v+,n x.mybytes.com/StudentRep to find out
unore
"I ASSISTANT for locating and copying
ournal articles. typing. etc. Ed. Stud. pref.
3 Fid. Sched. $10/hr. Kathleen 971-6485.
PATIENT ATTENDANT-University
ospital. $6.75 per hour, plus off shift bonus.
-fmipig for all shifts, minimum 8 hours per
week including some weekends and holidays.
PrivIde observation, companionship.
assistance to patients. some direct patient
cure. Must be 18 years or older. Contact 763-
5637 for more info.
JWYSICAL ASSISTANT NEEDED for
disabled male law student.
Weekend/weekday hours avail. Pay neg.
* 01 train. Call Chris 332-0976.
SALES ASSOCIATES Gala Hallmark -
Briarwood Mall. Great job for students!
immediate positions available. Part-time.
h.ll-iine. Flexible hours, generous employee
id4scount & bonus plan. Apply in person or
lax resume to 734-665-1612 attn: Vickie.
Want to Work For
Chicago's Best
Companies?
The best entry level growth
opportunities for college
students and grads
'Cop paying full-time and tempo-
afy positions
*Administrative
.uustomer Service
R& Marketing Assistants
3nance Professionals
Mall now to work during Winter
rpak or to get your career search
tarted!
ANCED PERSONNEL
1*;A-CAREER
aqareer@advancedgroup.com
SATURDAY DRIVER wanted to deliver
iwals for Motor Meals of Ann Arbor. $9/hr.

Phone 763-2377.
SBAMAN DRUM BOOKSHOP immediate
FT & P/T temp. positions textbooks. Apply
person or call 662-7407 Dave or Rise.
'TOWROOM ASSIST. Assisting
salespeople with customers, moderate lifting,
ard basic store maintenance. Qualifications
Jnclude able bodied person who can lift at
least 50 lbs., self-motivated, neat appearance,
and, good with people. Hours flex. Start
ASAP. Apply at Mir's Oriental Rugs 331 S.
Main St. Ann Arbor, Ml 48104.
STUDENT FINANCIAL Assistant Winter

TRAVEL ADVISOR. STA Travel seeks SIZE DOES MATTER!
bright individuals for our U of M and Ann BIGGEST BREAK PACKAGE
Arbor locations. Ideal applicants have a BEST PRICE FROM $29
passion for travel, are customer focused, and WWW.SPRINGBREAKHQ.COM
computer proficient. Previous sales exp plus. I -800-224-GULF
Entry level, will train. 17 K plus bonus,
benefits. Fax resume, coverletter, to Carol at-
734-668-8178. Rc

WANT TO GET INVOLVED? Apply to
be committee chair of UAC's mini-courses.
Gain organizational, planning and mgmt
skills. For more info call 763-1107 or stop
by UAC office 4002 Michigan Union.
WANT TO LEARN how to make SUSHI
and get paid? Competitive wages, free food,
beverages, and good tips. Call 677-0980 or
678-0550. Delivery drivers also needed.
Company car provided. EOE.
WENDY'S has openings for crew members
in our friendly environment. Up to SI10/h1r.
Apply in person at UM League #40. 911 N.
University or UM Union #28, 520 S. State St.
Stanton & Assoc. is committed to a diverse
workplace. Call 1-877-4WENDYS.
YOUNG ADULTS WANTED!
High School or College.
Earn full time income part time.
Full Training. Call 517-523-7327.

b E12
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Check a few of our low air rates
Detroit-Johnnesburg-Detroit $1286.99
Detroit-Delhi-Detroit $1169.59
Detroit-Caracas-Detroit $501.40
SPRING BREAK 2000. Panama City.
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\ \',hicakcrstravel coin I-800l-985-6789.
SPRING BREAK at Panama City Beach'
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The Millennium

BUDGET
Continued from Page 1
And lawmakers agreed on S1.3 bil-
lion to hire new teachers. Republicans,
.pushing local control, signed on to the
. Democratic measure only after it was
amended to allow a quarter of the
money to go toward training teachers.
In legislation adopted earlier in the
year, Republicans won a huge increase
in defense spending, including a sub-
stantial pay raise for military personnel,
and boosted government funding for
scientific research.
Even as the booming economy allows
the parties to rain cash on their favorite
programs, a mentality of fiscal responsi-
bility pervaded the budget negotiations.
"There was certainly more discipline
than last year," said Don Wolfensberger,
a scholar of Congress at the nonpartisan
Woodrow Wilson Center in
Washington. "The temptation to spend
is there, and still there was a little more
restraint this time around, which is pret-
ty remarkable."
To fund the $7 billion in new spend-
ing, Congress approved, among other
things, a plan - pushed by conserva-
tive advocates of fiscal discipline in
Congress - to cut spending across the
board, instead of dipping into the tril-
lion-dollar federal surplus.
Republicans had initially proposed a
1.3 percent cut, but that plan fizzled.
Lawmakers later agreed on 0.38 percent
across the board, excluding military per-
sonnel, with savings of $1.3 billion for
next year. The deal gives the president
flexibility in distributing the cuts.
Policymakers on both sides sang
their own praises for increasing spend-
ing without depleting the surplus,
which would have drained funds from
the Social Security program and
delayed payments on the national debt.
But Wittman said conservatives had
abandoned their commitment to slow-
ing the growth of the federal treasury.

"The economy is growing much
quicker than the government,' he said,
tempting both parties to spend on new
government programs. "The dilemma
for conservatives is, How do you
restrain spending in an era of surplus?"
As the budget battles drew to a close,
everyone seemed to agree that the
vibrant economy had altered the politi-
cal landscape, allowing the parties to
compromise and each pursue targeted
spending increases.
But compromise was more than a
convenient possibility at the session's
end. After months of bitter, partisan
warfare on Capitol Hill, beginning with
impeachment, compromise had become
a political necessity, as the public grew
wary of what it perceived to be a divi-
sive, impotent Congress.
With the exception of a bipartisan
bill to repeal restrictive Depression-era
banking laws, the 106th Congress -
popularly dubbed "the do-nothing
Congress" - bickered on issue after
issue, stalling legislation indefinitely or
killing it altogether.
"I think the well has been poisoned,"
Frenzel said. "The Congress and the
president used to work more amicably,"
he recalled, looking back on his years in
the capital.
Earlier in the year, after a spate of
school shootings across the country,
both chambers took up gun control.
With partisanship in high gear, law-
makers offered only modest proposals
and adopted incremental reforms. The
legislation never cleared the confer-
ence between House members and
Senators to synthesize the two ver-
sions.
On health care reform, with divisive
rhetoric and mud-slinging on display,.
the House and Senate made headway in
the effort to protect the rights of
patients using managed care providers.
But once again, two different versions
of the legislation died in conference.
A Republican plan for a S792 billion

tax cut shared a similar fate. The House
and Senate never resolved differences
between their two plans and GOP lead-
ers were unable to rally support to over-
ride a presidential veto.
In a break with tradition, the Senate
took up campaign finance reform and
prepared for thorough debate and a sim-
ple up-or-down vote. But all hopes of
passage were shattered by a threatened
filibuster, which stalled debate and
doomed the legislation.
And in a stinging defeat for Clinton,
the Senate last month voted down the
Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty, which
would have outlawed nuclear testing by
signatories. The bill died strictly along
party lines, even as a majority of
Senators sought to delay a vote.
An array of polling data shows the
American public frustrated by the
Congress's inefficacy. As the election
season unfolds, with each party des-
perately seeking a majority in both
chambers in 2001, leaders recognize
that their public images needed hon-
ing.
"They want to show that they worked
out their differences," Wolfensberger
said. "Everybody wants to say they
brought home the bacon.
At yesterday's ceremony, Clinton
challenged Congress to overcome
internal divisions for the American
people.
"In the weeks and months ahead," he
said, "we can achieve these vital goals if
we keep in mind that the disagreements
we have are far less important than our
shared values and our shared responsi-
bility for the future."
And so the session that began with a
vigorous debate over "high crimes and
misdemeanors" and "our sacred honor"
ended rather quietly yesterday, with the
customary hand-shaking and back-
slapping that follows a worthy accom-
plishment in Washington.
- The Associated Press contributed to
this report.

6 MO. YR. OLD BOY needs babysitter.
T/Th 7:30-10:30 A.M. during Winter term in
Westside Ann Arbor home. 622-9830.
BABYSITTER NEEDED afternoons,
winter semester s5-2 hrs. Mon. & Weds. a
must. Needs transportation. Call 623-0264.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for 9 yr. old girl
after school. Flex. sched., good pay. Car
needed. Call 668-1332.
BABYSITTER NEEDED- Tues. and Thurs.
for' children, ages 2 & 4. S7.50/hr. Appox.
I5 hrs/wk. Please call Dawn (g 998-0322.
BABYSITTING NEEDED for a 6-month
old infant weekday mornines/ early
afternoons 3-4 times a week /bf Witer term.
Very pleasant job: On campus, time tof
homework and access to computer/ emal
while infant sleeps. Experience preferred.
Salary negotiable. Contact Dr. Kirschner at
647-7722 or kirschneQumich.edu. Set up
your work and class schedule now!
DRIVER W/ SAFE CAR for after-school
classes. Fridays 2:30-4:15 pim. 665-4719.
LOOKING FOR EXPER. SITTER for P/T
position (2 12 hr. days). Exper. w/ infants &
refs. req. 662-8918.
PART-TIME CHILDCARE provider in
nearby Ann Arbor home for happy toddler.
Competitive pay. Flex. hrs. - we can work
around your sched. Call Laura 747-9481 .
RELIABLE CAREGIVER NEEDED.
Beginning Jan. 3rd, 2 children, 3 days/week.
own car, references. Call 747-7513.

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas & Florida!
Best Prices Gusranteed!
Free Parties & Cover Charges!
Now Hiring Campus Reps!
1 -800-234-7007
www.endlesssummertours.com
***ACT-NOW! Call for the best Sprin
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www. leisuretours.com
BROWSE icpt.com for Springbreak "2000".
ALL destinations offered. Trip Participants.
Student Organizations& Campus Sales Reps
wanted. Fabulous parties. hotel & prices.
Call inter-Campus at 800-327-6013.
CANCUN & JAMAICA SPRING Break
Specials!,7 Nights Air. Hotel. Free Meals.
Drinks From $399! 1 of 6 Small Businesses
Recognized For Outstanding Ethics!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
COZY LOG CABINS S54-$89 nightly.
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EARLY SPRING BREAK specials!
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Includes Most Meals! Awesome Beaches.
Nightlife! Panama City, Daytona. South
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1-800-678-6368.
EARN FREE TRIPS AND CASH!!!
SPRING BREAK 2000
*CANCUN* *JAMAICA*
For 10 years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinguished itself as the most reliable
student even and marketing organization in
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Spring Break FREE & earn over
$$$$$ $10,000! $$$
Contact us today for details!
800/328-1509 www.classtravelintl.com
Ft.'IL' '

SPRING BREAK Panama City Beach
"Summini luxury condos next to Spinnaker
)v ner discount rates (404) 355-9637.
SPRING BREAK '00 Cancun. Jamaica
From 5399. Reps wanted! Sell 15 and travel
Fre! 1-800-446-8355 www.sunbreaks.comn
SPRING BREAK! Cancun, Bahamas,
.Iamaica, Florida & South Padre. Call
USA Spring Break for a free brochure and
rates and ask how you can EAT, DRINK &
TRAVEL FOR FREE! Call 1-888-777-4642.
cvww.usasprinabreak.com
vww.OPENSEATS.com
kichian online ticket source
hu /sel tickets
HAVE FUN RAISING FUNDS for your
clubs. teams. and groups. Earn up to 5500 or
more! Put our 25+ years of fundraising
experience to work for you. Call now for
details on a free CD of your choice. 800-592-
2121, ext. 725.
NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSE:
The Art and Science of Healthy Aging. Open
to all upper class persons. Tues. 6-9pmn.,
NURS 303. 3 cr. Contact Peggy @ 763-0002
or pengel@uinich.edu

WHEN AND WHERE.
Quality 16
December 2
WHAT.
Cardmembers get a compli-
mentary pass for two for
a preview screening of
Universal Pictures' new film
Man on the Moon to be
released December 22th.
HOW.
Just bring your American
Express* Card and your
student ID to the location
listed below to pick up your
pass.
SPECIAL OFFER
JUST FOR APPLYING.
Receive a complimentary
pass for two when you
apply for THE American
Expresso Credit Card for
Students.
MORE TO COME.
Man on the Moon is one in
a series of major motion
pictures to be previewed on
your campus this year,
compliments of American

I BDRM. IN 2 BDRM. APT. excellent loc.
Dishwshr., off-street prkg., washer/dryer,
sunny rm. Flex. start date Jan. - May. Call
Alex 662-3562.
COLLEGE COUPLE LOOKING for
another college couple to room with in an
Ann Arbor apartment in May. Call Kathleen
or Kevin @ 810-797-4123.
JAN.- AUG. NEED RMMT(S). to share I
spacious room. Fem. pref. Great loc..332-
1305 tvande@umich.edu

E

f

I M , - .z, ; MME

I

V food & entertain.I

Express.

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