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November 29, 1999 - Image 7

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-29

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Talibar
sanctio
The Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - In the ch
ors of power, Taliban officials
around space heaters are as defian
about the cause of Osama bin L
wealthy Saudi fugitive whose allege
attacks and continued sanctu
Afghanistan have led to new U.N.
sanctions against the impoverished n
"The United States wants u
Osama bin Laden's hands and sen
them as a gift," said Wakil
Muttawakil, the new foreign mi
the Taliban regime. "We are read
#n all issues. We have offered to I
tried here, or to have other MusLi
tries judge him. But how can we gi
a human being as a gift, especia
crime has not been proven?"
Muttawakil said Saturday in an inte
he expects only minor long-term impac
APPLI CANTS
Continued from Page 1A
Otudents into the U of M Medical
School. Within this broad spectrum
of students ... we hope to attract
the very best from under-represent-
ed ;Minority groups," he said.
Lichter described Project
ROPE a "wonderful coalition" of
schools and colleges within the
University that works with
Ypsilanti middle and high school
students by offering programs,
ncluding tutoring in math and sci-
0nce, job shadowing and tours of
the Medical Center and the Parke
II
HOW DOES TOBACCO SMOKING
AFFECT YOUR BRAIN?
Healthy male/fem. drug-free tobacco smkr,
ages 18-50 needed for studying brain blood
flow using a safe, short-lived radioisotope.
Interested volunteers must not be on any
chronic medications or abused substances.
Participants aregiven free medical work-up
&sched. for a morning study in University
Hospital, after overnight tobacco abstinenc
CAl 7,34-647-8239 & leave name. telephone
nUmber, when & where you can be reachec
Pays $250 upon completion of the study
involving about 5 hrs.
AWN MAINTENANCE en
leaders/members wanted. 973-0930. Va
Michigan license needed.
LUNCH SUPERVISOR needed 1.5 hrs/d;
at $8.75/hr. Inoves monitoring elementa
school students in lunchroom and
playground. Call Honey Creek Commun
School at 734-994-2636 for more info.
MODELS WANTED: All Ages.
Before/After Makeover
Contest 4 dramatic change
$2,000: $1,000: $500 prizes.
Me professional photo.
ew European Cosmetics.
Call 973-6301 for Appt.
MULTI-ETHNIC STUDENT Affairs
offering two work study student positions I
mornine and afternoon shifts. Contact Lou
Brooks at 763-9044.
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NEEDED: HEALTHY WOMEN betwee
the ages of 25-35 who have never had a bal
a needed for a gynecology research projec
As a part of the project, participants wi
u iidrgo pelvic imaging procedures and son
ancillary testing at no cost. Compensation
S200.00. For further information call 61'
1093 and ask about the PERL project.
PIT ASSISTANT for locating and copyin
journal articles, typing, etc. Ed. Stud. pre
Flex. Sched. $10/hr. Kathleen 971-6485.
PHYSICAL ASSISTANT NEEDED fi
sabled male law studen
M-kend/weekday hours avail. Pay nel
Will train. Call Chris 332-0976.
POSITIONS ARE STILL availablei
y arious campus libraries. Students are neede
to cover different shifts, mainly days betwee
c:0) am. - 5 p.m. Positions sta
itnmediatcly. If interested, apply at Libra
HIuman Resources, 404 Hatcher N.
REWARDING, EXCITING summer fI
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SALES ASSOCIATES Gala Hallmark
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Immediate positions available. Part-time
full-time. Flexible hours, generous employ
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SHAMAN DRUM BOOKSHOP imnmedial

The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 29, 1999 - 7A

officials greet U.N.

Pick card

ns with defiance

U.N. sanctions, which have grounded all foreign
flights by Afghanistan's only airline and frozen
Taliban assets abroad since they took effect Nov.
14. He declared that Allah will protect the
Afghan people from hardship at foreign hands.
"Every few years the United States looks for
someone new to hate. Before it was Libya and
Iraq, now it is Afghanistan's turn," he said.
"But if they try to harm us, they will gain noth-
ing. Almighty God always accepts the prayers
of the innocent and defends those who are
trampled upon."
But on the frozen streets of the capital,
where families shiver in bread lines or spend
the days collecting firewood to burn for
warmth, the traditional Afghan welcome for
bin Laden, a once-revered Muslim guest,
seems to be wearing thin.
"It is our custom to be hospitable to
guests, but we would also like Osama to
leave because of all the innocent people,"

said Mohammad Taj, 45, a laborer waiting
in line for his daily bread ration. "The peo-
ple with power will support themselves,
and the sanctions will only hurt the poor.
America should have more mercy, but the
mullahs must solve this problem with the
United Nations, too."
Many Afghan people blame the United
States and its allies for imposing new econom-
ic hardships on them. A week ago, buildings
occupied by U.N. employees in six Afghan
cities were stoned or burned by mobs, even
though they provide the bulk of food and
medical aid to the country.
"We are a weak country now, and
America is trying to keep us that way,"
said Abdul Razaq, 30, a father of five who
earns $4 per month as a night watchman.
"This is the time they should be helping
us, but instead they are aiming these cruel
actions against us because of one man."

Davis headquarters in Ann Arbor.
"In general, the purpose of
Project HOPE is to bring attention
to under-represented minorities
that medicine ... is a great career.
For some reason, this message is
not getting out,' Lichter said.
Associate Dean of Student
Programs at the Medical School
Rachel Glick reiterated Lichter's
statement that the Medical School
wants to make medicine more
accessible to minorities.
"We are trying to evolve and
enhance what we have, and we are
focusing on making our environ-
ment as comfortable as we can for

minorities," Glick said.
"We do a lot," she continued.
"Last year, we initiated a spring
weekend for accepted minorities
who had not yet committed and it
was well attended," Glick added.
Horne also underscored her
office's commitment to increased
minority enrollment.
"We usually have minority stu-
dent representatives meet appli-
cants to welcome them. Also, we
offer housing opportunities and
financial support for visiting stu-
dents that help to cut down on the
costs of traveling," Horne said.
The effect of these programs is

difficult to measure at this point.
The percentage of under-repre-
sented minorities enrolled in the
Medical School's first-year class
in 1997 was 14 percent. It then
dipped to 10 percent in 1998 and
rose to 13 percent in 1999.
Despite low minority applica-
tions and overall enrollment,
Horne maintained that the
Medical School will continue its
current recruitment programs.
"Even though the national and
our own trend of applications is
down ... our goal is to continue to
maintain a good percentage of
minorities in the class, she said.

AP PHOTO
Triplets (from left) Janice Laulainen, Jeanette Laulainen Laven and Joanne Laulainen Nelson,
dressed as cards from Alice in Wonderland, dance and greet spectators during the Holidazzle
parade on Nicollet Mall in Minneapolis on Friday.

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BABYSITTING NEEDED for a 6-month
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afternoons 3-4 times a week /bf Winter term.
Very pleasant .job: On campus. time for
homework and access toccomputer/ email
while infant sleeps. Experience preferred.
Salary negotiable. Contact Dr. Kirschner at
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DRIVER W/ SAFE CAR for after-school
classes Fridays 2:30-4:15 p.m. 665-4719.
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nearby Ann Arbor home for happy toddler.
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around your sched. Call Laura 747-9481.
RELIABLE CAREGIVER NEEDED.
Beginning Jan. 3rd, 2 children, 3 days/week,
own car, references. Call 747-7513.

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NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSE:
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COL LEGE COUPLE LOOKING fi
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The Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Supreme
Court this week will begin deciding on
the government's most formidable
effort ever to stop smoking, as public
pressure against the tobacco industry
increases.
In 1996, the Food and Drug
Administration broke with tradition
and proposed regulating nicotine in
cigarettes as a drug. In a plan to cut
down on teen smoking, the agency
issued rules that would restrict the
marketing and sale of tobacco prod-
ucts to youth. It was a decisive
moment for the government in the
national controversy over a product
that medical experts consider the pri-
mary cause of preventable disease and
death. But after a lawsuit by tobacco
companies, a federal appeals court
ruled that the FDA lacked the authori-
ty to regulate tobacco.
The case has arrived at the
Supreme Court, where it will be
argued Wednesday. An eventual deci-
sion by the justices not only will
determine the fate of the program to
prevent youth smoking, but, more
broadly, will test a comprehensive
federal endeavor to restrain a once-
powerful industry that is now under
constant governmental, legal and
societal assault.
In the four years since the FDA pro-
posed its regulations, cigarette compa-
nies, once impregnable in court, have
lost several high-dollar, personal-injury
lawsuits, including the first phase of a

Florida class-action dispute that could
cost the industry billions of dollars.
In 1994, Mississippi, followed by a
majority of the states, sued tobacco com-
panies to recover health expenditures for
smoking-related illnesses. The suits
were settled last year for $246 billion.
Finally, in September, the Justice
Department filed a lawsuit seeking
compensation for the medical costs to
the government of treating smokers and
accusing tobacco companies of con-
spiring to defraud the public about the
health risks of cigarettes.
"There is no question that the
world in which the tobacco compa-
nies operate is changing," said for-
mer FDA Commissioner David
Kessler, who had signed the pro-
posed rules to regulate nicotine and
has closely followed the case.
"No longer can they claim that
tobacco is not an addictive Sub-
stance. It is children who are becom-
ing addicted, and the industry's
major defense that smoking is a
matter of adult choice is no longer
credible," he said.
But lawyer Bert Rein, representing
Brown and Williamson Tobacco
Corp., counters that the case before
the high court is not about the health
consequences of nicotine but about
what kinds of regulations the FDA is
authorized to set down.
"We don't think this is a public
health case," he said. "This is an
effort by the FDA to grab power that
the Congress never gave it."

Supreme Court to
decide fate of stop
smoking campaign

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u p
t ' y V

DONATIONS
Continued from Page 1A
sale.
"We had planned to do a schoolwide
clothing drive but we were getting so
much stuff from the Law School, if we
were to get a similar response from the
rest of the school, we knew we wouldn't
be able to handle all the clothes,"she said.
Routel agreed that it is more efficient
to collect items within groups than
attempt to collect items from then
entire campus. "You need a bunch of
small communities working together,"
she said.
A smaller population helps drive
organizers do the one thing Masters
said is most likely to make a drive suc-
cessful: publicize.
Routel said the members of NALSA
and WLSA relied on word of mouth
and e-mail chains to get the high
response they received.
Broderick said for tomorrow's food
drive, ProjectSERVE and Circle K
International have planned to post
fliers, send out e-mails and make

resulted in 3,500 books for about 10
organizations, Watt said he hopes this
year's drive will yield a higher number
of books.
Watt added that this year, ARTC Is
accepting books at 12 more sites than last
year, including the English department
and the School of Social Work.
Routel also suggests enlisting volum-
teers to make any collection successful.
Members of NALSA and WLSA
staffed a table near the collection site.
"Putting boxes out is not going to get
anybody's attention," Routel said.
But student apathy may be an obsta-
cle those who intend to collect for a
cause may face. "When you have peo-
ple bringing stuff to a location, like the
Diag, that's probably a barrier,"
Broderick said.
Masters said students need an incen-
tive, such as a friendly competition
included in last month's Red Cross,
Alpha Phi Omega Blood Battle cam-
paign. The organizers encouraged
University students to donate more
blood than students at Ohio State
University.
"I m Tncc n .n..a have a n..,.ntaA ntpra-Qt

ate

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Main St Ann Arbor. Ml 48104.
STUDENT FINANCIAL Assistant Winter

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