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November 18, 1999 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-18

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 18, 1999 - 5A

OSU, Michigan battle to collect
used sneakers for Reuse-A-Shoe

DANNY KAICK/Daly
University of Colorado history Prof. Phil Deloria speaks Tuesday at Rackham
Amphitheater about Native American issues and his book "Playing Indian."
PI speaks
'Pla ying ,lI. n di*an'

By Marta Brill
Daily Staff Reporter
Want to ditch that pair of old running shoes
stinking up your closet, help the environment and
beat Ohio State? This week on campus there's a
way to do it all.
Nike is sponsoring a competition between the
University of Michigan and Ohio State University
to see which school can collect the most pairs of
used athletic shoes for Nike's Reuse-A-Shoe pro-
gram.
The University will ship all of the old shoes to
Nike headquarters in Oregon, where special
devices will grind them up and turn them into
synthetic soccer fields, tracks, basketball courts,
gymnastic mats and playgrounds around the
world, Nike Communications Manager Dawn
Leonetti said.
Often these playgrounds and courts are built to
help inner-city youth, said Campus Nike
Representative Randy Raisman, an LSA senior.
"Nike has a commitment to athletes, the envi-
ronment and society. We are killing two birds
with one stone by helping out the environment
and children," Raisman said.
Students can drop their old shoes, which do not
have to be Nike products, in boxes set up in Mary
Markley, Alice Lloyd and Couzens residence halls

until Wednesday.
Nike has also set up donation sites in the North
Campus Recreation Building and the Central
Campus Recreation Building.
"I'm glad I could participate in a project that
helps out inner city kids," Ohio State Student
Government President Josh Mandel said. "It's a
good cause, and I'm glad Ohio State and
Michigan are partnering up to do this together."
Last year, the first time Nike extended its
Reuse-A-Shoe program to college campuses,
Ohio State won the competition, collecting more
than 200 pairs of shoes.
Since 1993, Nike has worked in conjunction
with retail stores, placing boxes in athletic stores
where customers could recycle their old shoes.
In contrast to Raisman's enthusiasm, environ-
mental science Prof. Khalil Mancy said he ques-
tions the impact of a shoe recycling program.
"I'd be skeptical to think of it as a solution to

the problem of garbage" Mancy said. But
added that the principle was commendable.
Nike remains hopeful and would like to bring
the Reuse-A-Shoe program to more college cam-
puses in the future, Leonetti said. Currently,
Michigan and Ohio State are the only campuses
participating in the program. But Nike has bigger
plans than simply bringing the program to more
schools.
"Our long-term goal is that the athletes will
bring in their old shoes, and they will be turned
into completely new shoes," Leonetti said. The
goal is part of the company's sustainable initiar
tives.
Eventually, the hope is to have a no waste sys-
tem of production, with products being reused
continually, Leonetti said.
Mancy said the concept of a no waste system if
valid, similar to Volkswagon using the metal frox
used cars to produce new ones.

"We are killing two birds with one stone by helping
out the environment and children.'
- Randy Raisman
Campus Nike representative and LSA senior

By Jennifer Sterling
Daily Staff Reporter
Balancing humor with intellect,
University of Colorado history Prof.
Phil Deloria lectured about the under-
lying themes of his book "Playing
Indian," while educating nearly 100
audience members with entertaining
slides of political cartoons, docu-
ments and photographs used to illus-
trate his arguments.
During Tuesday's discussion in
Rackham Amphitheater, Deloria
used U.S. history to support the con-
cepts in his book about the stereo-
types Native Americans must per-
petually confront. He gave an histor-
ical account of the birth and evolu-
tion of the Native American role in
U.S. society.
He spoke about U.S. history using
slides that lured the audience of stu-
dents and community members into
the discussion. One of the first slides
Deloria showed pictured the label of
Snapple iced tea. He drew attention
to the Boston Tea Party scene etched
on the bottle and questioned its pur-
pose.
He used this minute detail on the
Snapple label to lead into his argu-
ment about how Native Americans
and their culture haverplayed and
continue to play a role in the
American identity. "What's up with
the Indian thing?" he asked, referring
to the Snapple label.
He described how participants in
the Boston Tea Party dressed as
Native Americans, suggesting that

they wanted to mask themselves as
Native Americans so that the British
would associate colonial Americans
with Native Americans.
Rackham student Andrew Adams
introduced Deloria, calling him an
"established and emerging author."
Another part of Deloria's presenta-
tion focused on his explanation of the
value system in the United States as
related to the stereotypical perspective
placed on Native Americans. He
explained the system as a hierarchy,
with nobles on top, savages on bottom
and Indians falling into both cate-
gories.
Contrary to what many people
believe, Native Americans do not
need to fit the physical description
associated with their culture to
identify as Native American,
Deloria said.
"I agree with him that authenticity
doesn't mean truth because non-Indian
people think of Indians in stereotypical
terms" said Law first-year student
Kirsten Carlson, a member of the
Native American Law Student
Association.
"His analysis of closeness versus
the value system was really good. It
added a lot of perspective," Carlson
said.
Deloria opened his lecture recall-
ing the last time he spoke in the
amphitheater at Rackham.
"Something about this room just
scared the hell out of me, he said,
evoking laughter from the audience.

WANT TO WRITE FOR THlE DAILY? CALL 76,wDAI LV.'
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Does Morality Need God?
A public lecture by
Dr. John Hare
Philosophy professor at Calvin College .
And author of The Moral Gap
Date: Thursday, November 18'h 1999
Time: 7:30 pm
Place: Rm. 116, Hutchins Hall, School of Law
NE corner of Monroe and State Streets
For more info, see www.campuschapel.org
Sponsored by Campus Chapel Ministries, Graduate Christian Fellowship,
Christian Legal Society, and Ad Hoc (Christians at SSW)

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