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November 16, 1999 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-16

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, Novemer u, - r
LOCAL/S TATE
lollinger to receive ode amendment proposal

By Jeremy Peters
Daily Staff Reporter
University President Lee Bollinger will
receive a report containing proposed amend-
ments to the Code of Student Conduct in the
,ar future, Student Relations Advisory
ommittee Chair Al Burdi said yesterday.
Burdi said that his office is focusing on
amending the Code with the help of three
Michigan Student Assembly representatives.
"I think we need to be very careful about who
speaks for students. With the students on our
committee, we will be having dialogues ... and
if the Code is a source of noise, we will help
them with that," Burdi said.
The Code, which has been a source of contro-

versy since its inception, is the University's
internal disciplinary policy for students.
Burdi said that he feels most students are in
favor of a code of conduct in one form or anoth-
er.
Members of the Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs debated the merits of the
University's Code at their weekly meeting yes-
terday afternoon.
SACUA Vice Chair and biology Prof. Lewis
Kleinsmith voiced his concern over what he
called "selective enforcement" of the Code.
"Take alcohol violations for example. I would
guess that many students drink. A very large
fraction of the student population isunderage
and I recall that there were a relatively small

number of infractions for drinking' he said.
"A policy that so many are in violation of and
only a few are prosecuted ... that sets the stage
for selective enforcement. So who gets prosecut-
ed?" Kleinsmith asked.
Other SACUA members expressed concern for
students' prosecution under the Code even if local,
state or federal charges against them are dropped.
"If a student is considered for violations under
the Code and he is also subject to criminal pros-
ecution, what happens if the criminal charges are
dropped?" questioned Medical School Prof.
Peter Ward.
"If indeed double jeopardy is possible
under the Codedthen this is very troubling for
a democratic society," said sociology Prof.

"I think we need to be careful about who

speaks for students"

-
t

- Al Burdi
Student Relations Advisory Committee chair

...

Don Deskins.
Deskins also said he was troubled by the
Office of Student Conflict Resolution's authori-
ty as the sole enforcer of the Code. The three
member advisory oversees implementation and
interpretation of the Code.
"This does not seem reasonable," he said.
Until Bollinger sees the proposed amend-

ments, no changes will be made because he has
the final decision on all amendments to the
Code.
In the meantime, SACUA, MSA and
University administrators, the only parties th4
can propose amendments to the Code, will runs
nate over what suggestions they should submt
to the president.

'U' reaches out to students' families

Creative-expression

By Jan Zemke
Daily Staff Reporter
In an effort to ease international stu-
dents families' transition into the
University community, the
International Family Outreach Program
effers many activities.
Izumi Sakamoto, director of IFOP,
said the volunteer program has been
helping the spouses and children of
foreign students for the past two
years. Often these people feel shut out
from the rest of the community, he
said.
"Our goal is to make the transition
smooth and then people feel more con-
nected to the community," Sakamoto
aid. "When you're a foreigner you
on't feel very connected. We help that
process."
A majority of the families that
IFOP helps reside in North Campus
housing. Sakamoto said that IFOP
assists 60 percent of the population in
the 1,500 University Housing units.

Outreach program tries to
ease language difficulties

The volunteers, a mix of students and
community members, help with trans-
lation and child care. A majority of
the families involved in the program
are Asian families.
"A lot of people don't speak English
fluently when they come over with their
spouses," Sakamoto said.
IFOP offers several activities to help
the families of foreign students become
more connected with the community.
Its primary service is a newsletter
called "The Calendar" It is written by
foreign students and their families with
editing help from native speakers and
students.
"It's moving towards our goal of
being for the residents by the residents'
IFOP community liaison ,Akanke

Omorayo-Adenrcle said. "Right now
we have a lot of residents who give us
articles for the newsletter, and the stu-
dents or native speakers come out and
help proofread and format"
Another of the activities that IFOP
sponsored was a Halloween costume
exchange and party.
"People dropped off old costumes
and exchange them for new ones,"
Sakamoto said. "We had a party on the
31st to follow it up."
IFOP also offers counseling and sev-
eral seminars to help the families of for-
eign students. Omorayo-Adenrele said
that the language barrier that the spous-
es and children face is a major obstacle
for them to assimilate. The counseling
and seminars play a major role in bring-

ing them into the community.
"We do yoga, stress management,
and quilting seminars which are very
well attended," Omorayo-Adenrele
said. "We've done it for the last two
years and those are usually around
February. It is a wide range of activities
but not on a daily basis.
IFOP also offers drop-in hours for
counseling twice a week on Mondays
from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Thursdays
from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The office is at
2364 Bishop St. Apt. 7. But Omorayo-
Adenrele said that a lot of the work
takes place outside of the office. A
majority of that work is done by the 10
students that volunteer for IFOP along
with community members like
Omorayo-Adenrele.
"It's more social in nature,"
Sakamoto said. "People say they're
more connected to the community than
before. They recognize there are other
people besides themselves. We help
people form their own support net so

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By Lindsey Alpert
Daily Staff Reporter
Students who wonder where all of
those extra room and board additional
charges go each semester may have a
chance to get money back.
The Residence Halls Association -
an organization that serves as a pro-
gramming resource and representative
of the student body - passed its budget
a few weeks ago, providing for $12,000
worth of student allocations.
Most of students' room and board fees
goes directly to residence hall govern-
ments, which receive $16 of the $22 fee.
$4 goes to the hall's multicultural council
and the remaining $2 goes to RHA.
RHA President Jason Taylor, an LSA
senior, said that this year, the association
received a total close to $17,000 from the
9,200 students living in residence halls.
RHA collected an additional $22,000
this year through fundraising.
"Each year the amount of money col-
lected varies," Taylor said, explaining
that students, organizations, residence
halls and multicultural programs can
apply for the money. "We have a lot
more money than anticipated because
of the fundraising, so we can in turn
give out more money."
The remaining 40 percent RHA col-,
lects from the student fees and from
fundraising goes toward internal
expenses.
"Part of the operation expenses go
towards getting the assembly to work
together as a team," RHA Vice
President of Finance Dean Nelson said.
"A few weeks ago we went to laser tag,
which was a really good opportunity to
get to know everypne better."
More than $10,000 ofthe budget is still
available to student groups that can apply
for money during the academic year.
Allocations are divided into three
categories. Money is given to groups
doing projects for residence halls, such
as a cappella groups that want to hold a
concert in a residence hall.
Multicultural councils, groups based in

residence halls and resident advisers
also can receive money for putting on
programs. The third group funds events
that take place on campus for students,
such as speakers.
Last year, RHA allocated $6,500 oQ a
budget one half the size of its budget
for the current academic year. So f4r
this year, $1,350 has been allocated to
three different groups.
The association gave Bursley Family,
the multicultural council in Bursley
Residence Hall, money to rent out the
Quality 16 movie theater in Scio
Township and pay for a bus to takcres-
idents to see the film "Best Man' Ottle
Shop, a campus group that puts on
plays, used RHA-allocated money to
help cover the costs of buying the-rights
to a play. The third allocation went to
the Lloyd Hall Scholar Program for'its
Halloween on the Hill event.
"My experience has been positive in
the past;' Taylor said. "One of the tea-
sons that we allocate money is because
groups are really good at putting"pon
programs. They know what they want
to accomplish and often come up with
some really good programs."
Students or organizations in seatch
of allocation money can visit the
RHA Website, www.umich.edu/~ ra,
to access more information, including
guidelines and getting an application
form. Also, students can attend RNA
meetings, which take place Thursdays
at 7 p.m. in the Wedge Room inWest
Quad Residence Hall.
"Our meetings have been really full
and everyone comes with ideas," said
Nelson, an LSA first-year student. "I
think RHA is a good organization
because if there are even problems, we
try to fix them."
RHA also sponsors the Pre-Class
Bash in September and Siblings
Weekend, which is scheduled to take
place in February. The association
finances both events, using money
from the 60 percent designated to -go
directly to students.

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MAJORIE MARSHALL/aily
Rackham Graduate Student Jose Raul Perales and LSA junior Juan
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RHA allocatesg
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