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November 12, 1999 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-12

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EN'S NCAA
ASKETBALL
Iowa 70.
i1i CONNECTICUT, 68
(13) STANFORD 80,
(10) Duke 79, OT

NBA
BASKETBALL
Tof onto 123,
DETROIT 106
Seattle 109,
CLEVELAND 103
INDIANA 116,
Orlando 101
MIAMI 128,
Dallas 105

NHL
HOCKEY
BOSTON 4.
Toronto 3
Nashville 2,
OTTAWA 1
N.Y. Rangers 5,
WASHINGTON 4
PHILADELPHIA 4,
Carolina 1

Liria &l

The Michigan men's basketball team continues its
exhibition season on Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Michigan
battles Team Prestige in its last game before beginning
the season against Oakland on Nov. 19.

,
November 12,

Friday
1999

M' faces Penn State's dangerous QB rotation

By Andy Latack
Daily Sports Editor

p

At the beginning of this season,
Michigan coach Lloyd Carr and Penn
State coach Joe Paterno were in
unfamiliar situations. Two of the
more traditional football minds in
4 country were faced with an
increasingly modern dilemma -- two
qualified quarterbacks. and one spot
to play them at.
In seasons past, both coaches
would have auditioned the candidates
to death, finally deciding on one in
the days leading up to the season
ipener and maybe even announcing
the decision to the media sometime
before kickoff.
ut things were different this year.
arr simply' could not choose
between Tom Brady and Drew
Henson. Paterno felt the same about
Kevin Thompson and Rashard Casey.
5 So both coaches scrapped their
old-school approaches and went with
two-quarterback systems.
But whert No. 16 Michigan (4-2
Big Ten, 7-2 overall) visits No. 6
Penn State (5-1, 9-1) tomorrow, only
e of the teams will still be playing
sical quarterbacks.

Paterno is still using Thompson
and Casey, but Carr trashed his sys-
tm a few weeks ago, electing to give
Brady the majority of the duties.
Carr approached his rotation
methodically by starting Brady, let-
ting Henson play the second quarter
and making a decision at halftime.
But Paterno, one of the most
revered coaches in college football
history, has no such formula for
deciding his quarterback of the
moment. His approach is admittedly
fly-by-the-seat-of-the-pants, at times
playing Thompson for one drive and
Casey the next.
"I really do not know at times
when I am going to play either one of
those kids," Paterno said. "I go into
the game with that attitude."
But the play of Thompson and
Casey have made it tough for Paterno
to make a bad decision. Although
their national title hopes were
crushed with last week's loss to
Minnesota, the steady and unselfish
play of the quarterbacks have the
Nittany Lions in contention for a Big
Ten championship and BCS bowl
berth.
Thompson is a traditional drop-

back passer, his mobility more like a
linebacker than a running back.
Casey, on the other hand, is elusive
and tough to get a handle on, making
him a threat on the ground as well as
through the air.
"I think it really changes the game
when Casey comes in because the
pace of the game changes," Carr said.
"Just when the offense breaks down,
he has the ability to make something
happen."
Which makes it all the more diffi-
cult for Michigan's defense to pre-
pare for this game. They've faced
plenty of traditional quarterbacks
like Thompson already this season,
such as Purdue's Drew Brees or
Michigan State's Bill Burke.
They have also chased around their
share of slippery signal-callers as
well, like Indiana's Antwaan Randle
El or Notre Dame's Jarious Jackson.
But they've never faced two in the
same game.
"They both have things they do
better," said Michigan safety Tommy
Hendricks, who will be counted on to
stop Thompson's passing as well as
See LIONS, Page J1

CROSS COUNMY
Who: Michigan men's and
women's teams at NCAA Great
Lakes Regionals.
Where: Terre Haute, Ind.
When: Saturday, 11:30 a.m,
The Latest: Michigan hopes
to secure bids for the NCAA
Championships on Nov. 22 in
Bloomington.
FIELD HOCKEY
Who: Michigan vs. Duke
Where: The Kentner Center,
Winston-Salem, N.C.
When: Saturday, 1:30 p.m.
The Latest: This is Michigan's
first NCAA Tournament game
ever. If Michigan wins, it plays the
Wake Forest-James Madison win-
ner on Sunday.
SOCCER
Who: Michigan at Wake
Forest
Where: Spry Stadium,
Winston-Salem North Carolina'~
When: Saturday, 1:30 p.m.
The Latest: Amber
Berendowsky has three career
goals against Wright State.
Michigan leads the series 3-0.

Revenge-minded Lions loom

By T.J. Berka
Daily Sports Editor
At this time last week, it looked as if
Michigan would get a chance to play
Moiler to Penn State's national champi-
7hship hopes. Sorry, Wolverines.
Minnesota beat you to it.
{ But Michigan still has the chance to
screw Penn State out of another howl.
Penn State controls its own destiny for
the Rose Bowl. All it has to do is win
tomorrow's game and win next week
against Michigan State.
But if the Nittany Lions lose, the bid
more than likely goes to Wisconsin,
ih only has to get by putrid Iowa
orrow to keep its Rose Bowl shot.
So this game has a lot of meaning in
Happy Valley. But Michigan has a lot rid-
ing on this game too.
If Michigan pulls the upset, the
Wolverines' chances of spending New
Yea's Day in Florida skyrocket.
And even without the bowl implica-
tions, Penn State has lost to Michigan the

past two years by the combined score of
61-8. So revenge is a factor as well.
Will Penn State get its revenge? Will
Michigan avoid, for at least this week, the
prospect of going to the Alamo Bowl?
MICHIGAN RUSHING OFFENSE VS.
PENN STATE RUSHING DEFENSE: For the
first six weeks of the season, the
Michigan running game was about as
effective as a poorly-placed mother joke.
The Wolverines ran for barely more than
100 yards per game and forced Tom
Brady and the passing attack to step up.
But Anthony Thomas has resurrected
the formerly dormant rushing attack the
past three weeks. Thomas even passed
the l,000-yard mark this past weekend
against Northwestern. With that mile-
stone, it seemed as if Michigan's rushing
troubles were done.
The Penn State defense will be a per-
fect indication as to whether Michigan's
rushing attack is back to its traditional

form. The Nittany Lions boast one of the
nation's premier defenses and have three
potential NFL first-round draft picks
among their front seven.
Defensive end Courtney Brown, mid-
dle linebacker Brandon Short and outside
linebacker LaVar Arrington will all be
millionaires someday. But on Saturday,
they have to stop Michigan and its beefy
offensive line.
Michigan's running game has
improved, but it's not ready for the heat
and intensity that Penn State will bring.
ADVANTAGE: PENN STATE
See MATCHUPS, Page 11

SAM HOLLENSHEAD/Daily
Josh Williams and the Michigan defense could have their hands full with the con-
trasting styles of Penn State quarterbacks Kevin Thompson and Rashard Casey.

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