100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1999 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Forum highlightsr

LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 11, 1999 -

-0

O

women in science

By Shabnam Daneshvar
Daily Staff Reporter
The Center for the Education of Women
hosted their first open forum on women in
science yesterday with three women facul-
ty researchers as well as University stu-
dents.
The event involved talks from Carolina
Lithgow-Bertelloni, assistant professor of
geological sciences; Joanna Mirecki-
Millunchick, assistant professor of materi-
al science and Engineering; and Helen
Pass, assistant professor of surgery.
Although the panel focused mainly on
Oiese women's individual careers as engi-
neers, surgeons and geologists, a primary
topic was the decreasing trend for men and
especially women participating in the sci-
entific fields.
"Education has become the highest
import" in the United States, said sociol-
ogy Prof. Muge Gocek as she noted the
decreasing numbers of men and women
in the sciences and the fact that many
ompanies are now forced to hire interna-
tonally.
Gocek and audience members engaged
in a discussion which established the
importance for both genders to apply

themselves more and the need for science
oriented individuals in the work force.
Lithgow-Bertelloni shared her love for
her field in geology and stressed the
importance of familiarizing oneself with
earth sciences and the environment.
"I taught a first-year level on geology
and the importance of knowing more about
the environment. At the end of the semes-
ter, many students told me they would have
never cared about the environment as they
did at the end of class because they know
so much more about the situation and the
politics," she said.
Lithgow-Bertelloni referred specifically
to voting issues on global warming and
other environmental hazards.
"Dialogues like this are important. I am
pleasantly surprised to listen to these
women and see that the science fields,
unlike what many have thought throughout
the years, is not just geeked-out men,"
Mirecki-Millunchick said.
Carol Hollenshead, director of the
Center for the Education of Women,
described the event as "terrifically impor-
tant" to women within different specialties
and careers.
"It is so exciting to see the interest

DANNY KALICK/Da'iy
Assistant geological sciences Prof. Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni speaks in West Hall yesterday
at a forum focusing on women in science.

between the scientists and nonscientists,"
she said.
Hollenshead also pointed out the need
for more women to involve themselves
within the engineering and material sci-
ence fields.
"The biological fields are reaching a
parody. Top 20 (Education) schools around
the nation now have 45 percent women
enrolled," she said.

But Pass, also the director of the
University breast cancer department,
spoke of the changes needed within even
the medical and biological fields of sci-
ence.
She maintained that even though many
more women are acquainting themselves
with the biological sciences, much more
research should be performed on women
within the clinical trials.

Displays, danc
offer ghmpse
of Middle East
By Jody Simone Kay
Daily Staff Reporter
Students walking into the Michigan Union Ballroom tody
may be transported to distant cultures - at least for a little
while.
"The original idea was to give an opportunity to travel to a
country you would not normally see" said LSA sophmoru
Reza Breakstone, a member of the Persian Stutdent
Association and an organizer for the event.
The first ever "Tour of the Middle East" includes Prsiart,
Armenian, Turkish and Arab cultural displays and perfor-
mances from IlI a.m. to 5 p.m and from 8 p.m. to I an. The
American Movement for Israel also was invited to participate
but was unable to because of a lack of resources, Brakstons
said.
"The situation in the Middle East is moving towards better
cooperation between the Israelis and the Arabs and we re ijy
wanted to reflect that on campus" said LSA Senior Ai nt
Mackie, an organizer from the Arab-American Anti
Discrimination Committee.
"Even if the situation wasn't good in the Middle East, r
would want to come together" Breakstone added.
The event is cultural in nature, not political, said LS
junior Katy Pearce, an organizer from the Armenian Students
Association.
The 12 students on the planning team described the event
as a Middle Eastern bazaar, or marketplace, with inform -
tional displays, traditional outfits, pictures, flags and art-
work. Cultural performances are planned for every hour.
"You normally hear all of the politics. This is a chance >o
see the real human aspect of the Middle East; What doesa
sound like, what does it taste like, what does it looklike'?"
Mackie said.
The sounds will be of traditional instruments such as ti
Tableh, a small hand drum, Santoor, an Iranian string ist ri-
ment and 'Aoud, an Arab folkloric guitar.
The Habibi Dance Troupe, a professional dance group
from Lansing, will be performing during the celebration. The
members perform and explain various dances from severAl
countries, including Lebanon, Morocco and Iran.
"It's very expressive because all the dances have stories
and messages behind them," said Pearce, who has seen tp
troupe perform.
In addition watching to cultural dances, students will be
able to participate in contemporary dance workshops from 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. Students will have the opportunity to learn
such dances as Dapkeh, a Lebanese line dance, and Bandari,
a South Iranian dance.
"This is the first time, on our own accord, that all of the
groups have come together," Breakstone said.
Pearce said that planning the event has been educational
for those involved.
"The goal is to educate ourselves and the University com-
munity, to work on stereotypes and try to expand everione's
knowledge of this region and its cultures" Pearce said
HE DAILY IS ALWAYS.,
LOOKING FOR WRITERS.
CALL 76-DAILY.

Students mark start of Native
American Heritage month

By Robert Gold
Daily Staff Reporter
Watching and discussing "Smoke
Signals" - the first feature length
movie produced, directed and written
by Native Americans - students from
various groups on campus began the
first of a series of events to celebrate
Native American Heritage Month.
Several University associations are
sponsoring the November activities,
ranging from speeches to dinners. They
organizers include the University chap-
ter of the American Indian Science and
Engineering Society, the Native
American Student Association, the
Native American Law Student
Association and the American Culture
program.
Shannon Martin, Native American
coordinator for the Office of Multi-
Ethnic Student Affairs, said the organi-
zations began planning the activities in
July with the formation of the Native
American Programs Task Force - a
group of 16 students, staff and faculty
from the various Native American and
cultural associations on campus.

She said one of the task force's major
goals is to offer open discussion for stu-
dents interested in their heritage.
"Another thrust of the programming
is to bring about the awareness of the
contributions of the Native American
people to the larger campus communi-
ty" Martin said, adding that collective-
ly, the sponsoring student groups have
about 30 "core members."
Yesterday's film, a 1998 Sundance
Film Festival award winner, drew less
than 10 students. Cristina Azocar, a
doctoral candidate and member of the
Upper Mattaponi Tribe of the Powhatan
Nation, led a post viewing discussion
last night. Azocar, who studies cultural
stereotypes in the media, said movies
and television shows often portray
Indians as "shamans and stoic," and the
movie "uses the stereotypes humorous-
ly in order to demystify stereotypes."
While small in number, NASA co-
Chair Jackie Pilette said the event was
stimulating for those who attended.
"There are a lot of things people are
not comfortable talking about," Pilette
said. "You could ask questions and peo-

ple wouldn't look down on you."
While last night's event drew few in
number, many organizers said they are
optimistic about attendance at upcoming
events. Martin said the campus organiza-
tions have been celebrating Native
American Heritage Month for the last
seven years, adding that while movie dis-
cussions rarely bring a crowd, others
activities draw more than 400 people.
Martin said a much anticipated activ-
ity among organizers is the Nov. 16 dis-
cussion about what kind of roles Native
Americans play shaping the American
Identity. A history professor from the
University of Colorado is scheduled to
lead this discussion in the Rackham
Amphitheater at 4 p.m.
Engineering senior Marissa
Ettawageshik said an increased aware-
ness about the upcoming events among
students will bring them to the remain-
der to the heritage month events.
"We haven't done a lot of publicity
yet," Ettawageshik said, adding NASA's
plans include an increase in fliers and
cooperation with the minority peer
advisers in University residence halls.

DANNY KAUCK/Daily
Public Health first-year student Shawna Red Cloud discusses
the film "Smoke Signals" in the Huetwell Visitors Center last
night.

MOTIVATED & POSITIVE PEOPLE to
join our firm. -Fast paced. casual. & fun.
Scheduling: Pleasant phone manner. efficient
typing skills & team attitude a must. FIT &
P/T Call Colleen: 668-8148 x203. or e-mail
coleenm@second-to-none.com
. USIKER TOURS AND SUMMER
DISCOVERY
SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES
Counselors needed for our student travel
programs And/or our pre-college enrichment
programs. Applicants must be 21 years old
by June 20. 2000.
We need:
*Mature
*Hardworking
*Energetic individuals who can dedicate 4-7
weeks this summer working with teenagers.
To receive an application or to find out more
formation: Call (888)8SUMMER or
mail: jen@summerfun.com to set up an
nierview on November 19. 1999.
NATIVE SPANISH SPEAKER needed as a
conversational partner for Ann Arbor
businessman. Will pay! Contact Bill at 622-
8756.
ON CALL SUBSTITUTE teachers needed
for Child Care Connection. Exp. working w/
pre-school ages & under pref. 734 994-1150.
P/T OR F/T help wanted for woman's
clothing boutique in Kerrytown. very flexible
urs, good pay. Call Tara at 994-6659 or
4-5326.

Want to Work For
Chicago's Best
Companies?
The best entry level growth
opportunities for college
students and grads
Top paying full-time and tempo-
rary positions
*Administrative
*Customer Service
*HR & Marketing Assistants
*Finance Professionals
Gall now to work during Winter
break or to get your career search
started!
ADVANCED PERSONNEL
888-A-CAR EER
acareer@advancedgroup.com
PETLAND IS NOW HIRING for
experienced Fish Keepers to assistecustomers
& maintain tanks. Full or part time. Friendly
environment. Pav commensurate with
experience. Call 482-8993 & ask for Derek.
PLOWING. SUBCONTRACTING,
Shoveling. Our plow truck or yours. Full time
positions available or Seasonal, great 'z.
ob. most work done between 1aIpmand 8a n.
Solid hourly pay plus extra production
incentive pay! Call us first. Mike Riley, 973-
0930 or email, amservices@mindspring.com
Servinz Ann Arbor for 25 years.
QUICK $$$$ Freelance Writer:
Earn S25/per article or story
Earn C('MainCampus.com
SECURITY GUARD to work on UM
campus pat-time or full-time. Good driving
record. familiarity with campus a plus. Apply
at State Securits Services. 525 Church. Ann
Arbor. 668-0444 EOE.

TUTOR WANTED who can teach a
Japanese high school student who needs extra
review to catch up in school subjects.
especially math. Tutoring after school hours
for a couple of times a week is required.
Being bilingual (Japanese and English) is
desired. Contact Nina (810) 231-7374.
U OF M, DEPARTMENT of Human
Genetics is looking for a Research Associate.
Must have experience with mammalian tissue
culture, including familiarity with the
equipment as well as cell lines, and basic
procedures of recombinant DNA technology.
Ability to work independently and as apart of
a laboratory team. Please mail resume to:
Jane Sierra, Human Genetics. 4708 Med. Sci.
11, 1301 E. Catherine Street.. Ann Arbor, Ml
48109-0618. Fax to: 734-763-5831, E-mail
to:imsierra@umich.edu.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for website
design usability study. I hr. $20/hr. No exp.
necessary. To sign up callChris @ Diamond
Bullet Design 734-665-9307.
WAITSTAFF, HOSTS, & DAY bartender
needed. Apply in person: Cleveland's Gill
and Grill 311 S. Main.
YOUNG ADULTS WANTED!
High School or College.
Earn full time income part time.
Full Training. Call 517-523-7327.

60B00Y OES S -' 9 e - - ETTER
rA a rv9 Mllenn u
w Swng mak with Sunchmle
s s
"
- r
INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1-800-SUNCHASE

GO DIRECT! #1 Internet-based company
offering WHOLESALE Spring Break
packages by eliminating middlemr.,! ALL
Destinations! Guaranteed Low.".. Price! -
800-367-1252 www.springbreakdirect.com
I NEED 2-3 tickets for Ohio State Game.
Call/email 327-3671 or heathi@umich.edu
I NEED 4 TICKETS to OSU game. Email
khans0997@yahoo.com
MAZATLAN 2000 from $399 (after
discount) 14 FREE meals. 23 Hours of FREE
drinks. $30 EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT.
$100 off Trip in 2001 !!! CALL FREE 1-800-
244-4463, www.collegetours.com.
NEED 2 TICKETS FOR Ohio State Nov.
20. Call 1-800-333-7707 ext. 8892.
PENN STATE PACKAGE. Air. van. came
tickets for two, in Saturday morning. out
Saturday night. Byron 248-354-2500.
SPRING BREAK 2000
Acapulco. Cancun. Ski Canada and many
others looking for reps. you could go free...
Regency Travel. 209 South State St. A2
48104. Call 734-665-6122 or
www.denise.kataiamaki @wspan.com
Check a few of our low air rates
Detroit-.Iohnnesburg-Detroit $1286.99
Detroit-Delhi-Detroit $1169.59
Detroit-Caracas-Detroit $501.40

SPRING BREAK '00 Cancun. Jamaica
From S399. Reps wanted! Sell 15 and travel
free! 1-800-446-8355 www.sunbreaks.comn

SPRING BREAK! Cancun, Baharitas,
Jamnaica, Florida & South Padre. Call
USA Spring Break for a free brochure and
rates and ask how you can EAT. DRINK &
TRAVEL FOR FREE! Call 1-888-777-4642.
ww .usasnrincbreak.com
announcements
FREE CD of Indie music when you register
at mkybtcs.com, the ultimate welbsite for
vour colleae needs.
LESSONS: Guitar. Bass. Banjo, r 'i x H.
Dulcimer. Sitar. Balalaika Ino, Brass. Fiddle,
Perc.. etc. Herb David Guitar Studi& 302 E.
Liberty. 665-8001.
LOOKING FOR AN INTERESTING
winter. 200() coarse? Consider the
Department of Dance. Division 671# Majors
and non-:Majors. undergrads & graduates
kcclcome: Permission of Instructor Reqdiied.
Course #337. Topics in World Dance: 3
Credits. Prof. Foeel & Prof. Geiine.
Course#358. Dance in Culture: Origin's of
Jaa Dance. 3 Credits. Prof. Wilson: Course
#462. 001. Animation Software. 2 Credits.
Adjunct Lecturer Francesco. Course #462.
002. Improvisation. 2 Credits. Prof. Wilson.
Mini-course #471/650. Sectioi '603.
Independent Study: Four Women in Dance.
based on the performances of Four Major
Women Choreographers. 2 Credits, Prof.
Delanehe. Course #490/590. Topics in
Damic: The Dancer -& Individual Style. 2
Credits. Prof. Soledade. Course #535,
Cultural Concepts of Dance. 2 Credits. Prof.
Sparling.
THE KEY OF DAVID. Earthshaking
Revelation for the Millennium! Write: The
Key. Box 534. Parkchester. NY 104(2

.:i.www.sunchase.com -..
8 C
CANCUN & JAMAICA SPRING Break - R a
Specials! 7 Nights Air. Hotel. Free Meals. Q-;
Drinks From $399! 1 of 6 Small Businesses v
Recognized For Outstanding Ethics! -C
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386. Qo
COZY LOG CABINS $54-S89 nightly. ."
Inc. out-door hot tub. ski trails & more. Near ^ W

Web Programmers new
e-business "startup" venture funded
by a hundred plus year old parent
company seeks strong program-
mers. Java/JSP, Oracle, SQL, Perl.
We are looking for creative hard-
working individuals to play a signifi-
cant role in a startup team."
Ann Arbor area,
excellent salary and benefits,
li@telested?
Elladi text only resumes to
job~ faktct Of

SHOWROOM ASSIST. Assisting
salespeople with customers. moderate lifting,
and basic store maintenance. Qualifications
include able bodied person who can lift at
least 50 lbs., self-motivated, neat appearance.
and good with people. Hours flex. Start
ASAP. Apply at Mirs Oriental Rugs 331 S.
Main St. Ann Arbor. MI 48104.
STUDENTPAINTERS.NET are looking for

ABLE CHILDCARE NEEDED. 8 & 11 yr
old brothers. 4 afternoons. 10-15 hrs/week.
Must have car. Call 663-3482.
FUN LOVING, reliable babysitter needed
for Ann Arbor family. Experience with
babies, 7-10 AM. M-F, S10/hr. 994-1584.
PARENTS' HELPER- Errands, cooking,
after-school care for middle schooler. Long-
term position. Mon, Wed. Thurs. afternoons.
13 hrs./wk. S10/hr. Need car. experience and
references. 995-1172.

Downhill. Traverse City (231) 276-9502.
EARLY SPRING BREAK specials!
Bahamas Party Cruise 5 Days $279!
Includes Most Meals! Awesome Beaches.
Nightlife! Panama City, Daytona. South
Beach, Florida $129! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6368.
SPRING BREAK 2000
SThe Millennium

Www. boersmatravef .CO
SPRING BREAK 2000. Panama City.
Davtona. Fl, S. Padre Island. Best
hotels/condos. Lowest prices.
www.breakerstravel.com 1-800-985-6789.
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH FLORIDA FROM
$99 PER PERSON SANDPIPER BEACON
BEACH RESORT THE "FUN PLACE"!
HOME OF THE WORLD'S LONGEST
KEG PARTY DRINK DRAFT BEER ALL
WEEK LONG TIKI BEACH BAR
ENTERTAINMENT BY BOOGIE
INCORPORATED BIKINI CONTESTS
MALE HARD BODY CONTESTS 3

11%) l

personalI

CIA" %I L nr. r "r IITIM' A Afi\ d- A Ci7ttt

I .= -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan