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October 29, 1999 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, October 29, 1999 - The Michigan Daily - 11

0This must
NEW YORK (AP) - By the end,
even the Atlanta Braves were
applauding the New York Yankees.
Chipper Jones chuckled as he
watched closer Mariano Rivera
break three of Ryan Klesko's bats in
the last inning of the World Series
*weep.
Manager Bobby Cox found coun-
terpart Joe Torre and congratulated
him in a stadium tunnel,
And John Smoltz personally com-
plimented batting coach Chris
Chambliss on New York's patience at
the plate.
"A lot of people love to hate the
Yankees -. they're that good,"
Smoltz said Wednesday night. "We
would love to be hated like they are.
hey were absolutely perfect. The
Yankees area model of how to win."
What else was there to say? Not
much as New York and the Yankees
braced for their third tickertape
parade in four years Friday.
"You always felt it was too good to
be true," Torre said Thursday as he
joined Clemens and others for a tele-
vision appearance with David
Letterman. "And then to have it fin-
sh the way it did, it was wonderful."
As confetti fluttered down on
Yankee Stadium and Frank Sinatra's
"New York, New York" echoed on
the sound system, a century of base-'
ball left fans with a final, fitting
image; one of the game's greatest
pitchers wearing the pinstripes of its
greatest team in the most storied
ballpark of them all.
Clemens validated his greatness
by beating the Braves 4-1 in Game 4,
and the Yankees did the same in
becoming the first club in 60 years to
sweep successive Series.
The Yankees tied the mark set by
their Murderers' Row clubs by win-
ning their 12th Series game in a row
and captured their record 25th cham-
pionship.

t be what it's like to be a Yanke

"We knewwe had thebest team in
the world and we came out and
showed that here," shortstop Derek
Jeter said.
Then, after reveling in the club-
house, the Yankees took off for a
party at the Oak Room at the Plaza
Hotel.
Jeter hit .353 against the Braves
and extended his postseason hitting
streak to a record-tying 17 games At
just 25, won his third ring.
Clemens earned his first taste of
the title at 37 - the same age John
Elway was when he won his first
Super Bowl.
Charged-up on the mound but able
to keep his pitches down, the five-
time Cy Young winner threw shutout
ball into the eighth inning. Clemens
then watched from the dugout as
Rivera closed out the title and earned
the Series MVP award. The reliever
gave his signed spikes to the Hall of
Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y
"This must be what it's like to be a
Yankee," Clemens said.
Torre told him later: "This is what
you came here for."
Traded from Toronto to the
Yankees in spring training, Clemens
spent the whole season trying to
prove himself to his new teammates
and fans. lHe struggled, going 14-J)
with a 4.60 ERA, and was occasion-
ally booed in his own ballpark.
But that was all forgotten on his
shining night. He began the evening
by patting the Babe Ruth monument
beyond the bullpen and walked off
the mound to an enormous ovation,
raising both arms to acknowledge the
cheers.
Later, while other Yankees cele-
brated with champagne in the club-
house, Clemens climbed onto the
dugout roof and ran back and forth,
slapping hands with everyone he
could reach.
The Yankees became baseball's

AP Photo
io and
late in
passed
Series
er died
uesdav
s one,
sweep.
ital, he
ch the

EU agrees with US:
IOC plans 'arrogant'
Officials denounce handling of dope issue

LISBON, Portugal (AP) --
European Union officials have
joined the United States in giving a
cool response to the International
Olympic Committee's plan for a
world anti-doping agency, a U.S.
official says.
Barry McCaffrey, head of the
White House drug policy office, said
Thursday that during his trip to
Europe this week, EU and national
leaders gave their blessing to alter-
native U.S. proposals for an interna-
tional agreement on tackling perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs.
"What we have is, I believe, a
growing consensus among the
nations - the Australians, the Writs,
the French, the Germans, the LU in
general - that there are certain prin-
ciples that ought to guide the final
solution," McCaffrey told The
Associated Press.
Those principles include a broad
international consultation process on
the proposed agency, which must be
independent of any other world body,
according to McCaffrey.
McCaffrey accused the IOC of
attempting to push through its own
project for an anti-doping agency
without consultation.
"I don't understand what the IOC
is doing. ... Normally we do things
by consultation, by consensus, by
common sense," McCaffrey said. "I

don't understand what the ... appar-
ent arrogance of the approach is."
The IOC plans to set up the agency
as a Swiss foundation on Nov. 10
with the appointment of a board of
directors. The IOC says the agency
will be up and running by the end of
the year.
M1:eCaffrey said the planned
agency would not be independent,
would not publish test results and its
anti-doping code would be only
advisory in nature.
He said the U.S. proposal includes
the establishment of an independent
and accountable agency which would
conduct tests on a year-round, no-
notice basis.
"We've got to move in this direc-
tion," McCaffrey said, noting that
the U.S. Olympic Committee had
agreed to the setting up of an inde-
pendent drug-testing agency for
American athletes,
McCaffrey believes next month's
Australian Sports Summit, where 26
nations will discuss doping in sports,
would be the ideal place to establish
common ground on the doping
agency.
McCaffrey was visiting the
Lisbon-based European Monitoring
Center for Drugs and Drug
Addiction as part of his six-day trip
to four European countries to discuss
drug-control policy.

Manager Joe Torre and owner George Steinbrenner celebrate the 'perfect
Yankees' 25th World Series title this millenium.

first repeat champion since Toronto
in 1992-93 and posted the first set of
consecutive Series sweeps since the
Yankees in 1938-39.
Corning off last year's record 125-
win season and sweep of San Diego,
New York finished off a streak in
which it won 18 of 19 postseason
games.
The year began when Darryl
Strawberry was beset by health and
legal problems. Then came Torre's
prostate cancer, and the deaths of

Hall of Famers Joe DiMagg
Catfish Hunter.
Scott Brosius' father died
the season. Luis Sojo's father
away right before the World
began and Paul O'Neill's fath
a few houirs a ftr Game 3 T1
night.
"Your dad got to see this
Torre told O'Neill after the
"He'd been so sick in the hosp
hadn't been able to wat
games."

Nebraska coach Solich
tones down criticisms

m

STAFF PICKS

All picks made against
the spread.
Home teams in CAPS.
Aichigan (-17) vs. INDIANA
Penn State (-16.5) vs.ILLINOIS
Wisconsin (-22) vs. NORTHWESTERN
Purdue (-2.5) vs. MINNESOTA
OHIO STATE (-22) vs. Iowa.
Florida (-14) vs. Georgia*
Florida State (-13.5) vs. VIRGINIA
Virginia Tech (-22) vs. PITTSBURGH
TENNESSEE (-33) vs. South Carolina
SJOTRE DAME (-27) vs. Navy.
Rice (-11) vs. SMU
SYRACUSE (-19) vs. Boston College
GEORGIA TECH (-17.5) vs.N.C.State
WASHINGTON (-3) vs. Stanford
Best Bet
Last week

T.J. Berka
Indiana
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Ohio State
Georgia
Florida State
Pittsburgh
Tennessee
Navy
Rice
Boston College
N.C. State
Stanford
Rice
10-4 (0-1)

Rick Freeman
Michigan
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Ohio State
Georgia
Virginia
Virginia Tech
Tennessee
Navy
Rice
Boston College
N.C. State
Washington
Navy
8-6 (0-1)

Josh Kleinbaum
Indiana
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Ohio State
Florida
Florida State
Pittsburgh
South Carolina.
Navy
Rice
Syracuse
N.C. State
. Stanford
Ohio State
8-6(1-0)
45-50-3 (2-5)

Andy Latack
Michigan
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Ohio State
Florida
Florida State
Pittsburgh
South Carolina
Navy
SMU
Syracuse
N.C. State
Washington
Purdue
7-7 (1-{)
4946-3(3-4)

Something's
got to ,give
OK, an unprecedented three
Daily pickers are above .500.
Even the lone editor (and
we're not naming names,
here) who isn't picking better
than random chance would
allow is still a respectable 45-
5-0-3.-
So what'sswrong? Usually,
these guys are supposed to
have allthe foresight of Ted
Stepien. Daily staff picks have
more often been an almost
sterling example of what not
to do.
But not this year. This year,
somehow, this bunch of
"experts" (and we apologize
to all dictionary publishers for
the use of that term) has
managed to turn in a not-so-
bad ag greg ate of 14 games
above .500. even other, lesser
publications on campus can't
make fun of us.

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) - The two
days since Nebraska lost to Texas gave
Cornhuskers coach Frank Solich a
chance to cool off a bit.
During his weekly television show
on Sunday night, Solich didn't hold
back about a couple of calls officials
made during Texas' 24-14 win. In par-
ticular Solich was upset about an
apparent hold not called during the
winning touchdown play and an
incomplete pass Solich said clearly
was a catch.
Words like "horrendous" and
"ridiculous" popped out in Solich's
comments about the plays during the
program. His words when asked about
the plays after practice Monday were a
little more subdued, but still critical.
Solich appeared to have vented by the

time his weekly news conference rolled
around Tuesday.
"I would rather not comment on
officiating. It appears that I've done
quite a bit in the last two days," Solich
said with a chuckle.
Solich wanted to be clear that he
never blamed the loss on the officiat-
ing. He said the bottom line was Texas
won because quarterback .Major
Applewhite had an excellent second
half, going eight of nine for 166 yards
and two touchdowns.
"Understand where we're coming
from. Certainly Texas deserved to win
the ball game because they made the
plays in the second half that they need-
ed to make to win," Solich said, "With
that in mind, that one's gone and we are
now moving on.:

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Overall 5441-3 ( -6) 49 -3 (34)
* at Jacksonville
Wolverines have to corral
elusive Randle El to win

Until we jinx ourselves.

HOOSIERS
Continued from Page 9
* With the Michigan defense of the
past two weeks, the Wolverines
could be looking at their third
straight loss.
"We can't feel sorry for our-
selves," Carr said. "There is no one
out there who is feeling sorry for
Michigan, I promise you. We need
to do the things it takes to win a
game."

Last week, Michigan didn't do
those things.
The Wolverines had a field goal
and an extra point blocked, had one
disastrous snapping error and lack-
luster play and play-calling
throughout the second half against
the Illini.
"I think every team reaches a
point of decision," Carr said.
Fighting for its Big Ten lives,
backs against the wall, it's decision
time for Michigan.

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Standards earer.
Agitator.
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