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October 22, 1999 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Scoreboard .
NFL NHL
Kansas City 35, OTTAWA 4,
'ALT IMORE 8 Colorado 1
ST. LOUIS 3.
Edmonton 2 (OT)
Anaheim at
CHCAGO, inc.

U~ieLirian si~

Tracking Daily idiots
In yesterday's Daily Grind, sports editor Andy Latack
mentioned that Florida State went undefeated last year.
Latack was very wrong. The Seminoles lost in the regular
season. Latack apologizes for his error, but his column
stands - the Hokies don't belong in the Sugar Bowl.
Friday
October 22,1999

Braving a

new frontier

I.

I 'M 'MW IV I, I., , -11: "

Frozen
north
f "
Inspires
sentiment
By Chris Grandstaff
Daily Sports Writer
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - We start-
our slow ascension, leaving the salt-
rtmmed waters of the Utah capitol
below, making our final push to the
great white north - the first Michigan
Daily staffers to do so.
The brown mountain tops of Utah, a
spectacular sight to three native
Michiganders, was only the tip of the
iceberg, so to speak. We climbed high-
er and higher, gradually crossing over
state after state toward our northern
goal.
Our 737 Delta air liner weaved in
and out of the most prominent peaks in
the Pacific northwest. We rose over Mt.
Hood, Mt. Adams, and the remains of
Mt. St. Helens - whose 1980 eruption
was one of the most catastrophic natur-
al disasters in recent United States his-
torv.
We moved further northwest, flank-
ing the pacific coastline of British
olumbia, marveling at the island-lit-
red shore before moving above cloud
level.
Our journey had started at 7 a.m.
yesterday morning, well before most
students had rolled over to hit the
snooze button for the first time. The
early morning stop-and-go traffic on
the way to Detroit Metropolitan Airport
was a stark contrast to the soft, cloudy
runway that now guided us to our coun-
try's northernmost boundary.
We were entertained, not by the
newest Julia Roberts film shown as an
in-flight movie, whose cheesiness is
approached only by this attempt at sen-
timentality, but by the ever increasing
excitement overflowing within each of
us as we imagined the glowing vistas
that would soon be unveiled.
See ALASKA, Page 11

I

'M' tries to block out
scenery against Nanooks

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By Stephanie Offen
Daily Sports Writer
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - At
Tuesday's practice, Michigan hockey
coach Red Berenson made-an uncon-
scious comparison between the city of
Anchorage, Alaska and the Alaska-
Fairbanks hockey team.
Little did he know that when he
watched the indecipherable tape of the
Nanooks earlier in the week that the
landscape of Anchorage upon arrival
could have been much of the same.
But, instead, the clouds and rain that
were forecasted for yesterday's leg of
the journey could not even begin to
overpower the snow-capped moun-
tains and the bodies of water that
stretched as far as the eye can see.
The tapes sent to Michigan of the
Nanooks were filmed by the team
itself, and Berenson was unable to pro-
duce useful information from his
viewings.
So the Wolverines will have to go on
their knowledge of four years of com-
petition with the Nanooks in order to
capture their 15th straight victory over
their conference foes.
Twenty-two players will make the
team's fourth voyage to Alaska.
But one of the trip's veterans, goalie
Josh Blackburn, will not be making a
return trip to the 49th state this year.
Blackburn, who grew up playing
hockey in Alaska, was scheduled for
for surgery on his foot Thursday.
"He is actually one of the players
who enjoys this trip," Berenson said.
"Last year, there were lots of people in
Fairbanks cheering on Josh."
Yesterday was the Wolverines' day
of sightseeing. After a day of
the Fairbanks museum and the musk
ox farm, the team will now focus on
the task at hand - beating the
Nanooks to remain undefeated.
"We're going up there to play hock-
cy," Berenson said. "That's the fore-
most concern on my, mind. This isn't a
y tourist trip."
Now with the jetlag hopefully hav-
ing worn off, and the parkas fitting a
little more comfortably, the

Wolverines find themselves in the
heart of Alaskan culture -- hockey.
Hockey is so big in Alaska, that the
Alaska-Fairbanks' athletic departiflent
pays for other universities in their con-
ference to travel here in order to bring
in more credible competition.
The Nanooks shell out money for
most of the plane fare and some of the
hotel fees for each team that travels to
Fairbanks.
Berenson said that this is what
entices the teams to make the incredi-
bly long journey which otherwise
would be a huge burden.
The time difference is not the.only
aspect of competing here that might
alter the play of the Wolverines.
Alaska-Fairbanks has an Olympic
size rink which Michigan is not used
to, but nonetheless could be helpful for
the Wolverines.
"It makes for a quicker, less physi-
cal game." Berenson said. "Both teams
will be tired. It could play to our
advantage because we are a speedy
team."
This adjustment won't only be for
the opposing teams. Guy Gadowsky,
who formally coached in the WCHL,
in California, enters his first, year; as
Fairbanks' head coach.
The snow, mountains and moose are
things Gadowsky has already adjusted
to. But the approval of the new size ice
rink is still up in the air.
"I don't know about it yet,
Gadowsky said. "Last weekend 'we
played in a regular size ice rink, even
though it was at home. We didn't have
a great weekend, and maybe that is
because of the adjustments. It will
probably take a couple of weeks to
determine the difference."
But the differences the Wolverines
have had to face here is clear., The
Nanooks might not be quite as intiini-
dating as the lifesize stuffed polar bear
that greets arriving passengers enter
Anchorage International Airport. but
the adjustments the Wolverines have to
make could play a major factor in
deciding the outcome of this week-
end's games.

t j
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DAVID KATZ/Da
Mark Mink and the Michigan hockey team looks to knock around Alaska-Fairbanks this weekend in Alaska. The Wolverines
are trying not to let Eskimos or pipelines get in the way of their undefeated start.

Stickers face weekend grudge match
By Joseph Farhat of Iowa saw the Wildcats put a little fielder Ali Balmer.
For The Daily scare into the Wolverines. In that During the first half of this game,
If revenge is a dish best served cold, game, Northwestern managed to shut Michigan was suffering from an emo-
then the No. 8 Michigan field hockey out Michigan for the first half and car- tional hangover from the draining
team could be in for some trouble ried a 1-0 lead into the second half. upset over Iowa. This weekend the
when it travels into Iowa City on The Wolverines would ultimately win order of the games is switched, which
jnday for a showdown with the third- the game on goals by senior midfield- means that the Wolverines might look
ranked Iowa Hawkeyes. er Erica Widder and sophomore mid- See HAWKEYES Page 11
Iowa's only loss on the season was
served up by the Wolverines on Oct. 8
in Ann Arbor. The forecast for the
game is calling for low temperatures in C O U L D ,
the m id-teens, but the action on the L A.fe d s o l b s h t av r
field should be as hot as ever.
"I'm certainly sure they're going to
try and avenge the loss," Michigan
sach Marcia Pankrantz said of the
Wawkeyes.
That win allowed Michigan to takeI C
over first place in the BigaTen.k SAN DW I HE59
..,Iowa (6-1 Big Ten, 13-1 overall) has
rebounded strongly from that early'
October loss. Their last game was a 3-
2 win over then No. 4 Penn State in
State College. The Hawkeyes scored
three goals in the second half to over-
'cme a 2-0 halftime deficit and raise
themselves back up to the top of the
ig Ten, where they're looking to stay.
Before the Wolverines can play "
Iowa, there is the little matter of the
Northwestern (0-7 Big ten, 4-10 over-
all) that they have to take care of on
Friday. The Wildcats are looking to
upset someone.
The Sunday 'after Michigan's upset

I -- I

f

REC
SPORTS
INTRAMURALS

The University of Michigan
Department of Recreational Sports
INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

T
1
L

WALLYBALL

I'
l
. .
. .
: v .

ENTRIES TAKEN:
Monday 10/25 ONLY
11:00 AM to 5:30 PM
ENTRY FEE:
$45 per team
MANAGER"S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Weds 10/27, 7:15 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
I'hurs 10/28
IMSB

NIKE

FLAG FOOTBALL
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Monday 10/25 ONLY
11:00 AM to 5:30 PM, IMSB

2

ENTRY FEE:
$72 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Weds 10/27, 6 & 9 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Thurs 10/28
Mitchell Fields

NIKE

9.

PRE-SEASON
BROOMBALL
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Mon 11/8 - Weds 11/10
11:00 AM to 4:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$45 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Thurs 11/11, 6:00 PM, IMSB
TOURNAMENT BEGINS:
Sun 11/14, Yost Ice Arena

WRESTLING

NIKE

ENTRIES DUE:
Thurs 12/2, 4:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$35 per team
$5 per individual
MANAGER'S MEETING
MANDATORY
Thurs 12/2, 6:300 PM, IMSB
TOURNAMENT DATES:
Tues - Thurs 12/7 - 12/9
Sport Coliseum

o,,

NIKE

Fntri f1

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K7

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