100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1999 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


MAJOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
National League
ATLANTA 4.
New York 2
Braves lead series, 1-0

NHL
HOCKEY
Florida 2,
MONTREAL 1
WASHINGTON 5.
Philadelphia 4

NBA PRESEASON
BASKETBALL
Orlando 99,
DETROIT 91
NEW JERSEY 115.
Atlanta 102
Milwaukee 103,
TORONTO 98
Philadelphia 85,
NFW YORK 78

S~Ije £idignu Nv

Tracking 'M' awards
Michigan hockey center Mike Comrie earned CCHA Dlay-
er of the week honors this week. The sophomore taiedO
four goals and two assists, including his first career hat
trick, helping the Wolverines to a sweep of Notre Dam .

Wednesday
October 13, 1999

14

Men's hoops ticket sales increases

By Mark Francescutti
Daily Sports Wter
Thanks to a top-flight freshman class
and increased marketing exposure, the
Michigan Ticket Office has sold 17 per-
cent more student season basketball
tickets for this season.
After selling a dismal 712 student
packages for the 1998-99 season, the
office sold 119 more 1999-2000 pack-
ages, Michigan Ticket Office Manager
Marty Bodnar reported.
While the new number translates into
a slight increase, it's still far behind the
thousands of tickets sold in earlier years.
Since the 1992-93 season, Michigan
has dedicated 3,100 seats to students.
More than 4,500 students applied for
tickets that year, but the numbers have
declined since - reaching only 712 last
season.
One of the problems that can affect
ticket sales is the confusion about the
deadline for applications. The Michigan
ticket office set a Sept. 24 deadline for
student ticket packages this season, even
bolding the date in its information sheet
included with student football tickets.
But the deadline for tickets doesn't
mean any more than the ink it's printed
with if the office doesn't sell the 3,100
tickets it offers. Since only 831 students
purchased tickets this year, plenty of
student ticket packages remain avail-

able, and even first-time ticket pur-
chasers have an opportunity to receive a
good seat.
"We have to set the deadline to get all
the applications into the computer, and
then sent to the printer," Bodnar said.
"Student tickets can still be purchased.
It's conceivable that (first-time buyers)
can get a decent seat."
Some students didn't know that the
supposed deadline is for naught, since
the information sheet about the tickets
doesn't explain what happens if tickets
are undersold. Students and their class-
mates who might have bought tickets
were left in the dark.
"I thought that deadline was written
in stone," Engineering freshman Marc
Shmerling said. "If I had known, I
would have gotten more people in my
group.
Michigan Marketing Director Tom
Brooks wants to give the students the
information.
The marketing department has insti-
tuted a plan to create more awareness
about tickets through the use of the
mgoblue.com Internet site. Students can
now find information about ticket pack-
ages and even purchase them online
with a credit card. Michigan also sent
out a mass e-mail reminding students
about the deadlines.
But Bodnar said the deadlines will

Yes ... basketball tickets are still available
Despite a Sept. 24 deadline, student season ticket packages for Michigan mens
basketball are still available. All students who purchase a package will receive a
free "Maize Rage" T-shirt. Tickets can be ordered from the ticket office at 1000 S.
State St. or online at wwwmgoblue.com/icketofffce
Past student season ticket sales
Here are the sales figures for Michigan men's basketball student season ticket sales. The data
includes overall ticket applicants and the number of season and split-season packages sold.
YeaYr Overall easn Spli
1999-00 831** 831 0
1998-99 712 712 0
1997-98 2,200 2,200 0
1996-97 2,796.- 2,796 .5 0
1995-96 3,830 2,404 1,426
1994-95 3,905 2,455 1,450
1993-94 ' 4,267 1,999 2,268
' 1992-93 - 4,542 1,678 2,870
Split season gives students a half-year ticket package "Through Sept 24 deadline.

r

r

have to stay for now, to give the ticket
office a chance to process tickets in a
timely fashion.
Brooks said that those students who
buy a student ticket package, whether it
be before the deadline or after, will
receive a free gift - a Maize Rage T-
shirt.
The Rage, which Brooks helped
develop last season, brought student
fans together by giving them a free yel-
low shirt and encouraging them to get

wild during home games.
"We want to give students an identi-
ty" Brooks said. "We want them to
know there's pride in being a season
ticket holder."
The office will hand out the free
shirts when students pick up their ticket
packages starting Nov. 1.
Single game tickets can also be purO
chased at a new special $6 price.
However, the home game against Duke
is excluded from the promotion.

DAVID ROCHKIND/Daily
Purdue quarterback Drew Brees squares off against undefeated Michigan State in
a weekend that should separate the men from the mice in the Big Ten.
['['at's gone wrong
wt B

NBA great Chamberlain dead at 63

S omething's wrong here. It's the
middle of October now, well
into the Big Ten football sea-
son, but the standings are just wrong.
Indiana and Minnesota ahead of
Ohio State and Purdue?
The Big Ten race is more muddled
than ever. Usually, this time of the
year, Michigan, Ohio State and Penn
State begin to emerge to the forefront
of the conference, waiting for the last
two weeks of the season when
Michigan faces the
Joshother bigwi gs.
Nowith this
Kleinbaum newfangled Big
Ten that has half
the conference run-
ning the spread
offense and
Minnesota -
Minnesota!
playing competi-
A ILYPsE tively, the Spartans
NowE are one of the two
remaining unde-
feated teams, along
with JoePa's Nittany Lions.
And after that, it's a mess. Michigan,
Wisconsin, Indiana, the Buckeyes and
the Golden Gophers all have just one
conference loss, and, with the exception
of Indiana, all are playing well enough
to make a run for Pasadena.
This weekend, while the Wolverines
sit at home licking their wounds from
an embarrassing loss to Sparty in which
they were thoroughly outplayed, look
for the contenders to separate from the
pretenders.
Penn State will face one of its stiffest
tests of the season in Ohio State, but
has the luxury of playing in State
College.
Purdue's Drew Brees will try to show
that he is still, in fact, the best quarter-
back in the conference, as Michigan
State's Bill Burke tries to show that his
eye-popping performance against
Michigan wasn't a fluke.
Indiana and Wisconsin are both still
darkhorses in the conference race, but
after Saturday, one will be out of it.
And Iowa and Northwestern play the
Pointless Game of the Week, a battle for
sole possession of the Big Ten base-
ment, which means it'll probably be a
CBS national telecast.

BIG TEN STANDINGS
Team Big Ten Overall
Michigan State 3 0 6 0
Penn State 2 0 6 0
Michigan 2 1 5 1
Wisconsin 2 1 4 2
Indiana 2 1 3 3
Minnesota 1 1 4 1
Ohio State 1 1 4 2
Purdue 1 2 4 2
Illinois 0 2 3 2
Iowa 0 2 1 4
Northwestern 0 3 2 4
LAST WEEKEND'S RESULTS
Michigan State 34, Michigan 31
Indiana 34, Northwestern 17
Penn State 31, Iowa 7
Wisconsin 20, Minnesota 17
Ohio State 25, Purdue 22
THIS WEEKEND'S GAMES
Ohio State at Penn State
Michigan State at Purdue
Indiana at Wisconsin
Minnesota at Illinois
Iowa at Northwestern
OGUNLEVE GONE: Now in his third
year as Indiana's head coach, Cam
Cameron has been trying to prove that
his school is not just a hoops school.
After a 34-17 victory over
Northwestern on Saturday - a game
Indiana once trailed by two touchdowns
-- the Hoosiers appeared to be on the
right track.
The win improved their record to 2-1
in the Big Ten and they looked to be a
potential sleeper in the conference race.
Which is why, when Adewale
Ogunleye went down with an injury on
Saturday, it was more than his knee
that hurt - all of Bloomington was in
pain.
The star defensive end has been a
force for the Hoosiers all season. In six
games, he has 22 tackles, 11 of them for
loss including eight sacks. The hard-hit-
ter has forced two funbles.
The tackles-for-loss, sacks and
forced fumbles all lead the team.
"No question, he was having an all-
Big Ten season, an All-America sea-
son," Cameron said. "We're going to
miss him, but he'll continue to captain
this football team."
- Josh Kleinbaum can be reached via
e-mail atjkbaum@umich.edu.

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Wilt
Chamberlain, one of the most dominant
players in the history of basketball and the
only one to score 100 points in an NBA
game, died yesterday at 63.
Chamberlain's body was found by
authorities who were called to his Bel-Air
home shortly after 3 p.m., said John
Black, a Los Angeles Lakers spokesper-
son.
A fire department spokesperson, Jim
Wells, said there were signs that
Chamberlain had a heart attack.
Chamberlain was hospitalized with an
irregular heart beat in 1992.
Known as "Wilt the Stilt" and "The Big
Dipper" the 7-foot-1 Chamberlain domi-
nated the NBA from 1959 through 1973,
when he played for the Philadelphia (later
the San Francisco) Warriors, the 76ers
and the Lakers.
He scored 31,419 points during his
career, a record until Kareem Abdul-
Jabbar broke it in 1984. Chamberlain,
who never fouled out in a 1,205 regular-
season and playoff games, holds record
for career rebounding with 23,924.
"Wilt was one of the greatest ever, and
we will never see another one like him,"
Abdul-Jabbar said.
Chamberlain, who began his profes-
sional career with the Harlem
Globetrotters in 1958, was one of only
two men to win the MVP and rookie of
the year awards in the same season
(1959).

He was also MVP in 1966 through
1968. He led the NBA in scoring seven
straight seasons, 1960-66, and led the
league in rebounding I1 of his 14 sea-
sons.
One of his most famous records is the
100 points he scored in a single game in
the Philadelphia Warriors' 169-147 defeat
of the New York Knicks on March 2,
1962, in Hershey, Pa.
In the 1961-62 season with
Philadelphia, he averaged a record 50.4
points a game, and averaged 30.1 for his
career. He also was one of the most ver-
satile big men ever, leading the league in
assists with 702 in 1967-68.
Chamberlain led his team into the play-
offs 13 times, winning two world champi-
onships. The first came in 1966-67 with
the Philadelphia 76ers, the second in
1971-72 with the Los Angeles Lakers.
A lifelong bachelor, Chamberlain
made news after his basketball career by
claiming in an autobiography that he had
made love to 20,000 women.
"The women who I have been the most
attracted to, the most in love with, I've
pushed away the strongest," Chamberlain
said in a 1991 interview with the
Associated Press.
His jersey was raised to the rafters of
Allen Fieldhouse in 1998, where
Chamberlain starred for the Jayhawks. He
led the 1957 team to the NCAA tourna-
ment finals, where Kansas lost to unbeat-
en North Carolina in triple overtime.

AP PHoO
Wilt Chamberlain, who averaged an unprecedented 50.4 points per game in one
season, died yesterday at the age of 63.

Former M' wrestler Reese remembered
Student-Athlete Advisory Council creates scholarship in his name

By Dena Krischer
Daily Sports Writer
It will be an unforgettable experi-
ence for an unforgettable person.
Exactly one year, 1 months,aand
11I days after after the tragic death of
Michigan wrestler Jeff Reese, 10
people will stand on the field of
Michigan Stadium - holding a ban-
ner in his honor - as the football
team takes thefield against Ohio
State.
Reese would have graduated this
spring as a fifth-year senior.
He would have finished his fourth
season as a wrestler.
He would have just celebrated his
23rd birthday.
He wouldn't have wanted to be

remembered any other way.
Reese, son of Edwin and Veronica
of Wellsburg, N.Y., desperately
needed to make his 150-pound
weight class one
- December day
two years ago,
and he only had
four days to do it.
He dedicated
the final 96 hours
making weight so
.. that he could
compete for his
team, for his
school, for his
wrestling career, for the love of the
sport.

Just over one-and-a-half pounds
short of his goal, Reese collapsed.
Less than an hour later, he was
gone.
But never forgotten.
As a tribute to Reese's hard work
and determination, the Student-
Athlete Advisory Council created
the first scholarship at Michigan to
be sponsored by a student organiza-
tion - a $100,000 endowment fund
in his name to forever instill his
brief presence as an elite athlete at
Michigan.
"The point is not to remember the
tragic accident," SAAC treasurer
and Michigan wrestler Matt
Michalski said. "The point of the
scholarship is to remember the per-
son."
The idea was proposed in
February, 1998, by Dwayne Fuqua,
the then-president of Michigan's
SAAC.
"We want to do something that
creates a memory for Jeff so people
won't forget about him," said current
SAAC president Andy Potts, a fifth-
year senior and former Michigan
swimmer. "Jeff didn't just die from
an accident. He died giving his life
for Michigan wrestling, and you just

can't give anything more than that,
He gave so much of himself to h:
wrestling that it consumed him a n
his life. I think that should speak a
lot about what he was trying to do,
what he wanted to represent." d
The scholarship is a way that the
athletic organization can do Reese's
memory justice. The SAAC plans to
give the scholarship to the varsity
athlete who representstthe drive and
the hunger to compete that Reese
possessed.
"We all want to give the most
everything that we do, and we wai7
to perform to our best ability as stu
dent athletes," Potts said. "That was
very important to Jeff, so important
that he was willing to push himself
beyond his physical limits. It's not
possible to give anything more than
what he gave, and we want to try and
remember that... remember why hV
gave his life, and remember him." :
The recipient will be decided
by the SAAC and Reese's parents. r
won't be a full scholarship, but;
according to Potts, it will be on a
need basis to help student-athleteg
with their athletic endeavors.
"You dedicate a lot of time being a
See REESE, Page 16

4 4 p
The University of Michigan Department of
Dermatology is currently offering a new
investigational treatment for acne.

... . f . a t ! 9

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan