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October 08, 1999 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-10-08

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The Michigan D ly - Frda October . 19

'aithful travelers flock to study abroad fair

Asma Rafeeq
i ySt dReporter
Paging through photos of mountains in Nepal,
tening to Turkish music and hearing stories of
Ilan villas, students wandered through the
ichigan Union Ballroom yesterday to get a
e of the University study abroad opportuni-
ailable to them.
Office of International Programs spon-
red the annual Study Abroad Fair, which drew
>re than 700 interested students.
At the table about Japan study options,
3A senior Suma Kinhal spoke to students
out her nine-month stay in Kyoto, Japan,
st school year.
"It's strange but I think I felt more at home there
in I do here," Kinhal said. "The experience was

really good for creating independence and self-
reliance."
The organizer of yesterday's fair. Kristin
Stewart, said more students than ever are taking
advantage of the University-sponsored programs
to study abroad.
A robust economy has meant that more par-
ents and students have the money to invest in an
overseas experience, Stewart said.
The types of programs offered also have
evolved in recent years, OIP Director Carol
Dickerman said. The first University-spon-
sored progrart began in the 1960s with an
academic year in Aix-en-Provence, France.
But there have been an increasing number of
programs outside of Europe, as well as more
semester-long programs.

"The type of student who studies abroad
has changed." Dickerman said. "It's no
lo .er just for language stadents."
LSA junior Andrea George. a film studies Con-
ccntrato, said she came to the study abroad fair
doubtful of finding anything relatel to her field of
study but was excited to learn of a program at an
Australian university with a large film archive.
"It's more uplitiing now," George said.
But organizing the fairand other information
sessions for students thinking of studying
abroad weren't the only activities keeping the
OIP staff busy recently.
With the recent threat of a volcano eruption in
Quito, Ecuador, QIP staff sprung into action to
assure that students studying there were safe.
When the yellow alert indicating caution changed

last week to at onge alert indicating a possible
eruption, the ofice itmmecdiocly citnacted
Unisersity students ulho are studying there
The I niversity detemined ;hit tw o of the stu-
dents in Quio arc lisiig in aris deemed to be
dangerous because of the possibility of lall-olit
and landslides from an ermption of the tearby
Guagua Pichincha vsleano.
But Dickerman s.iid arrangcments already
had been made for the students to move with
their host familtes to safer areas in case the vol-
cano does erupt.
To help ensure the safety of its participants,
every University-sponsored program has on-loca-
tion support staffmembers who are in contact'with
the United States embassy and local police, said
GIP Assistant Director Jordan Pollack.

Dickertvn ssid site immttclyl coiitced
pirents of the students studsing i Icuidii but
ouid thiat they had been iiin touch s ith thei ciii
dren and scire reassuired md ctlm about he sit
uation the oritage ilert iin [cuador his sitmce
dossnshitied to a yellow alert.
"Our first pnority is their safety " Pollack
said. When an earthquake struck Kobe. pan., a
few years ago, Pollack said within two hours le
knew via e-mail that the Um1tiersity studcnt
studving there was safe,
Due to safety concerns, the OIP ofice: does not
offer programs in some countnes that are polii-
cally unstable, Pollack said. Still, the tnisersav
offers more than 75 progranms in ob countrics on
six continents, the newest additions beng year-
long and semester programs in South Afric.

IEEMAN
tinued from Page 1
losers?
Never before have both teams been
. They've played games in which
th teams were 2-0, or 3-0, but
ichigan and Michigan State have
ver before met each other on such
s.
Which might make this game even
rucial for Spartans' fans. This is
i biggest game every year. For
'chigan, it can be less important -
t look at it like this.
If (and this is a Paul Bunyan-sized if,
) Michigan gets past the Spartans,
Wolverines don't face an opponent
this caliber until Penn State on Nov.
.The schedule of an off week fol-
ed by Illinois, Indiana and
rthwestern is no easy feat. In 1996,
tI m from the Big Ten's nether
Ws, Purdue, stomped all over the
lerines' Rose Bowl hopes with a 9-
'umph.
at was in the second of Lloyd
ri's four-loss seasons, and ever since
Wolverines lost 17-14 to Alabama
the Outback Bowl, big letdowns to
e opponents simply haven't hap-
ed. But big-time opponents have
en the better of Michigan on a few
ons.
e the start of the 1997 season,
ehigan is 27-3 - and no team has
n better. And those three losses
to these heavies: Notre Dame,
cuse and Ohio State.
f Michigan gets by the Spartans, the
lvernes can look back on this game
a defining moment, a time they
'rmed the potential they showed in
season-opener against Notre Dame,
backed up last week against
fSparty brings the mammoth Paul
yan trophy back to East Lansing
the first time since 1995, this game
ht be even bigger, for a reason
higan and its fans would rather for-
loss scuttles Michigan's legitimate
onal title hopes and tamishes the
-inspiring performance of the
IyVrines' defense against two
n hopefuls - Wisconsin's Ron
ne and Purdue's Drew Brees.
ut this game has implications far
side this 1999 college football sea-
.The bowl game and final record of
h team will become a secondary
bar to conversations that won't
ur for decades. When Michiganders
ak of this game five, 10, or even 50
rs from now, it will have been the
est the game ever was. They'll
,er who ranfor that crucial
Wwn, who cae up with the big
rception, and who won.
at happens later this season is
aterial, in a way. The same goes for
hing else happening at the same
e.
or three intense hours, this place,
lions of Michiganders - and
higanders at heart - will care
osely about this particular chunk of
ime and the outside world will
t,
Rick Freeman can be reached via
e-mail at rickfree@umich.edu.

Life imitates art

Rate of syphilis
at record low

ATLANTA (AP) -Tle syphilis rate
in the United States dropped 19 percent
last year to an all-time low, the govern-
ment reported yesterday as it launched
a push to stamp out the sexually trans-
mitted disease altogether.
The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention said the rate of new cases in
1998 was 2.6 per 100,000 people, down
from 3.2 a year earlier. Half of the
6,993 cases reported came from 28
counties, or less than 1 percent of all
US. counties. Most of the 28 counties
were urban. About 80 percent of all
counties reported no new cases.
"Clearly we have wrestled syphilis
to the ground, and now we have to put
it in lockhold from which it won't
escape," said Dr. Judith Wasserheit,
director of the CDC's sexually trans-
mitted disease prevention division.
"We have an unprecedented window
of opportunity to eliminate syphilis in
the United States because rates are at
an all-time low and because the dis-
ease now is extremely concentrated
geographically"
The drop has been attributed, in part,
to increased funding for treatment and
safe-sex practices prompted by the out-
break of AIDS, such as using condoms
SHEPARD
Continued from Page 1
Monday -- nationally recognized as
National Coming Out Day - is "Red
Shirt Day," when people wear red
shirts to show support for members of
the LGBT community.
"It's a way to make a statement,' said
LSA senior Luke Klipp.
The Office of LGBT Affairs also
plans to host a rally Monday on the
Diag to celebrate LGBT identity.
Participants will be able to "come out
of the closet" if they want, Klipp said.
Also on Monday, "Telling Ourselves
to the World: A Reading ofComing Out

and hasing fewer partners.
The South had the highest rate at 5. 1
per 100,000 and accounted for 19 of
the 28 counties that had the highest
number of cases. The rate was higher
among blacks - 17.1 per 100,000
compared with 0.5 among whites. But
the disparity has narrowed since the
beginning of this decade, when rates
among blacks were 64 times those of
whites.
"Syphilis, like many other health prob-
lems, tends to persist in communities that
are plagued by a number of social prob-
lems including poverty, lack of access to
health care and racism, Wasserheit said.
The syphilis rate has been declining
in the United States since 1990, when it
peaked at 50,578 cases, or 20.3 cases
per 100,404.
Syphilis is a bacterial infection that
starts with painless sores and then a
rash and can attack the heart and brain
and cause dementia and death. It can be
cured if treated early with antibiotics.
Surgeon General David Satcher and
CDC Director Jeffrey Koplan were to
join other national and local public
health officials in Nashville, Tenn., yes-
terday to announce the CDC's new ini-
tiative to eliminate syphilis.
Stories from Life and Literature" spon-
sored by the Lavender information and
Library Assoctattotnatnd the Office of
LGBT Affairs gives people the oppor-
tunity to share and listen to stories
about coming out experiences.
Later in the week, the Office of
LGBT Affairs plans to host other
events, including a discussion titled
"What's Morally Wrong with
Homosexuality" on Tuesday and a
film showing on Wednesday.
Students interested in receiving
isore inft-onation about National
Coming Out Week events can cal
the Office of LGBT Affairs at 763-
4186.

L,
f-

A business executive studies hI .map in front of a Tokyo bookstore as he imitates a statue of Kinjiro Ninomiya, a
Japanese symbol of study, yesterday.

GAME DAY
Continued from Page 1
ing into the game in more than 30 years. With both teams
undefeated, the pre-game hype for this heated rivalry -
which reaches high decibels in any given year - is at a
fevered pitch on the eve of tomorrow's game.
Whether it's around the office water cooler, on campus
or over the phone, members of both factions are declar-
ing war in their yearly quest for state bragging rights.
"I think the intensity of this game is very special,"
Michigan coach Lloyd Carr said. "The state is probably
pretty evenly divided. It's a game you know everybody
on both sides wants to win very badly."
Michigan has recent history on its side, winning the
last three meetings with the Spartans. And since 1970,
the Spartans have managed to beat their hated neighbors
to the southeast just six times.
Which means absolutely nothing to this year's partici-
pants'
"You throw out the records and you throw out thepast
matchups, because it is such a big intrastate game," said
Michigan nose tackle Rob Renes, a Holland, Mich.
native.
But with both teams entering the game at 5-0 for the
first time in series history, there is much more at stake
tomorrow than merely bragging rights. The Wolverines
and the Spartans are each undefeated and enjoying lofty
national rankings, so a loss tomorrow would be crushing
to either team's hopes of a conference championship and
beyond.
"This year, because we're both 5-0, there is the extra
added incentive," Renes said. "Whoever wins is still in
the hunt for the Big Ten title and the national title."

Michigan State usually isn't harboring national title
hopes midway through the season, but this year's team
has some in East Lansing ready to forget about last year's
6-6 effort that was left home for the bowl games.
But Michigan State coach Nick Saban isn't going to let
his players get distracted by hearing how good they are.
"We need to separate all that surrounds this game from
the team," Saban said. "We need to keep players separat-
ed so they can focus on what they need to accomplish.'
While Saban remains humbIle, Carr is extremely
impressed with the team that his counterpart has assem-
bled. The last time Carr saw a Michigan State squad this
good was in 1987, when Michigan State went undefeated
in the Big Ten - including a 17-11 victory over
Michigan - en route to winning the Rose Bowl.
"I can say clear-cut it's the best Michigan State team
since 1987," Carr said. "They have a lot of weapons and
they don't have any weaknesses. I think it's an outstand-
ing team"
There was similar hype here in East Lansing two years
ago, when Michigan, undefeated and ranked No. 5,
squared off with the 15th-ranked Spartans. The
Wolverines came away with a 23-7 win, and went on to
win the national championship.
And after the Wolverines bested the Spartans again last
year, 29-17, you can bet this year's upstart Michigan
State team is looking to even the score.
Michigan knows the Spartans will be out for blood,
and welcomes the challenge.
"This is truly the hardest hitting game I play every
year," Michigan linebacker Ian Gold said. "What more
could you ask for out of a big game?"
And as far as Michigan-Michigan State goes, they
don't get any bigger than this one.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHERS
WANTED
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WHO WANT TO TAKE LOTS OF PICTURES!
* $25 FOR EVERY PHOTO THAT IS ACCEPTED AND
OTHER GREAT INCENTIVES
" DIGITAL CAMERA PROVIDED FOR NON-OWNERS
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT ANNA AT
(734) 395-9905 OR VIA EMAIL TO
ANNAQLIGHTSURF.COM.
"BuildingYour
Own Theology":
Guild House Campus Ministry
This Week: Buddhism, Hinduism, B'hai
Every Saturday, September 18- November 13
(excep October 6 & November 6).
All invited to join this discussion group Northside Community Chufch
ninister Terry McGinn hosts discussions at the first3nmeetings surveying
the world's religious traditions, and Guild House campus inister Diane
Christopherson leads discussions in the final 3 meetings on rethinking
your own beliefs. 3 - 5 P M,
802 Monroe at Oakland. Free
662-5189
ARE YOU FEELINGAi"
SAD OR BLUE?
Medication-free women, sufferin from
depression between the ages o 18-48 are
needed for a treatment and research project
studying brain chemistry.
For more information call 936-8726.

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