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October 06, 1999 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-10-06

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coreboard _ U (Tracking 'IM' family fun
Major League New York at Colorado 3. The Michigan women's rowing team will host its
Baseball Playoffs ARIZONA, inc. NASHVILLE 2 annual Family Fun Row on Saturday from 10 a.m. until
DiAmerican Series NHL Phoeiomc 1 p.m. Fans are welcome to go out on Belleville Lake
n gR YORK s HOCKEY hxnwith members of the team for rowing lessons. The
Tas O Dallas 3. event is free and open to the public.
National League DETROIT 2
Division Series Ottawa 2 Wednesday
Houston 6, N.Y. R ANGERS 3SOTSOtbr ,19
ATLANTA 1 1 -

Fighting mad
otre Dame continues
its mastery over Blue, 4-1

By Matthew Barbas
or the Daily
SOUTH BEND - The No. 16 Michigan
soccer team traveled to No. 6 Notre Dame,
determined to avenge a 3-0 loss in last year's
AA Tournament. The Wolverines warmed
arith the look of a champion. But when the
whistle blew, the nerves set in.
"Our mentality was not there to start the
game. We were playing a little scared,"
ichigan goalie Carissa Stewart said.
Toward the end of the game, Michigan
played like it had in its recent four-game win-
ing streak, but the effort was too late. The
inning streak was over as the Wolverines lost,
- .
"To win a soccer game, you need to play all
) notes," said Michigan assistant coach
Sie Maier.
But the Wolverines didn't do that.
Notre Dame dictated the game in the early
ainutes. They maintained a ball-control style.
Vlichigan took a while to shift away from a
tick-and-run style of play.
Neither team challenged the goalkeepers
ntil the 20th minute, when Notre Dame forced
tewart to intercept a high crossing ball. Then,
econds later, Notre Dame All-American
ie LaKeysia Beene picked up a 35-yard
hot off the foot of Michigan midfielder
Andrea Kayal.
Despite the opportunities, neither team was
ible to build on its momentum. In the 28th
minute, Notre Dame striker Jenny Heft dug the
,alt out of a scramble at the top of the
Vichigan goal box. Heft took a left-footed shot
hat slid past the arms of a diving Stewart to
putNotre Dame ahead, 1-0.
Michigan retaliated in the 35th minute with
a arie Spaccarotella strike over the head of
3B e. Spaccartoella received an Emily
Schmitt feed in the left corner, cut towards the
middle of the field, and scored.
As halftime neared, Notre Dame increased
he pressure. After a series of corner kicks,

Irish midfielder Anne Makinen came up with
the ball eight-yards out. Makinen shot the ball
under a diving Stewart. Nancy Mikacenic
assisted on the goal. The Irish led at halftime,
2-1.
Notre Dame came out flying in the second
half. In just the third minute, Makinen found
herself in the Wolverines' box facing the goal.
Her shot sailed past Stewart into the net.
Midway through the half, Michigan started
to play like they weren't only ranked team in
the game. The Wolverines began to dictate the
play. The Irish bunched up in the middle of the
field leaving wing-midfielders Schmitt and
Michelle Pesiri open on the sides.
But in the 37th minute, Michigan's hopes of
getting back into the game were erased after an
Irish goal made the score 4-1. As Stewart
lunged to make a save, the ball slipped through
her hands and was volleyed in by striker
Meotis Erikson.
The Wolverines continued to show the
courage that they developed earlier in the half.
But the game would be won by the Irish.
The Wolverines' eight second-half shots
bested their first-half total by five. Also, after
not attempting a corner kick in the first-half,
the Wolverines had five in the second-half.
Though disappointed with the loss, the
Wolverines' performance in the second half
will give them something to build on for this
Friday's home game against Michigan State.
"We have a lot of respect for the Michigan
team," said Notre Dame coach Randy Waldrun.
"The difference was that we finished our
opportunities"
Unless the two teams meet in the NCAA
tournament, today's game was the last chance
for the Michigan seniors to beat Notre Dame.
The seniors have a record of 0-6 against the
Irish.
"I just hope that our team realizes that no
matter who the face, they can win," said
Michigan coach Debbie Belkin. "We need to
have more confidence."

Rivalry
'always a
war out
there'
By RICk Freeman
Daily Sports Editor
Although there will be almost no
actual soil on the Spartan Stadium
carpet, Saturday's matchup with the
11th-ranked Spartans might be the
dirtiest game the Michigan football
team has played in all year.
"It's always a war out there," said
junior defensive end Jake Frysinger.
"I don't want to say it's a dirty game,
but there's a lot of talk in the trench-
es.
There's been plenty of talk
already.
This is the highest the two teams
have been ranked in the week before
the game since 1961. That year was
also the last time both teams were
undefeated - the 2-0 Spartans went
3-0 and made the Wolverines 2-1
after their 28-0 win at Michigan
Stadium.
Never before have both teams
been 5-0. Spartans coach Nick
Saban said he hopes Saturday's game
can be a watershed moment in the
rivalry - a chance to place his pro
gram alongside Michigan's in the
national spotlight.
To that end, Saban has tried to
squelch some talk. He held players
back from their usual appearances at
Monday's press conference. This
could be his biggest game as coach
in East Lansing.
It's the hyper-bowl already, and
the game is three days away. Even
the excitable Ian Gold pointed out
that this game could be bigger, right?
See RIVALRY, Page 15

Walter Cross is about to experience his first trip to Spartan Stadium as a player in the state's
biggest rivalry, and may even see some trash talk and extra hits.

Volyeball spikes Irish in four

jyRaphael Goodstein
aily Sports Writer
The Michigan volleyball team
ended its three-game losing streak
ith a 15-11, 8-15, 15-10, 15-10 win
ver Notre Dame last night.
The Wolverines (1-3 Big Ten, 9-4
verall) don't have much time to cel-
brate the non-conference win
hough, because a crucial weekend,
i hich Minnesota and Iowa come
Go tiff Keen Arena, still awaits.
Notre Dame is the fifth Michigan
pponent that made the NCAA tour-
ament last year, and the win bright-
ened the Wolverines tournament
hopes that were a lot dimmer two
days ago .
The win may keep the 18th-ranked
Wolverines in the USA
Today/AVCA top 25. The
\*erines benefited from beating
three nationally-ranked non-confer-

ence teams before they started in the
Big Ten - the RPI's highest ranked
conference.
This weekend will provide the
Wolverines the opportunity to even
their conference record, something
they will have to do if they are to
reach the tournament - their ulti-
mate goal..
Minnesota and Iowa are two
winnable matches and, by then,
junior outside hitter Alija Pittenger
hopes her ankle sprain, sustained
last Tuesday, is healed.
But against the Fighting Irish,
Sarah Behnke, who got more playing
time because of the injury, was a
good fit.
The Irish are ranked 18th in block-
ing and Behnke is a more offensive
outside hitter than Pittenger.
Behnke is "a good solid attacker,"
coach Mark Rosen said before the

Bouncing back I
The Michigan volleyball
team rebounded from a
three-game losing
streak and outside hit-
ter Alija Pittenger con-
tinues to recuperate
from her sprained
ankle.
Now, all the Wolverines
need is a bounce back
in the polls.
match. 'The thing with her is we
need to continue to get better defen-
sively and that is something that
Alija brings.

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