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April 12, 2000 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-04-12

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, April 12, 2000 - 5
Final exams schedule create conflicts with holiday celebrations

FINALS
Continued from Page 1
week," Katz said.
This semester's exam schudule also cc
with the days preeceding the Christian h(
of Easter Sunday - Maundy Thursday
Good Friday.
"I wanted to go out of town, but nov
just going to schedule my exams aroun
holiday," Education senior Joseph Sai
said.
MODELS
Continued from Page
Schneider said.
"There's a lot of misconception in
the industry that you have to spend
thousands of dollars on photos and
lessons - that's just not true," he said.
Frequent patrons of Rick's said they
heard about the event through friends
and decided to attend as part of their
regular outings.
Representatives from UConnec-
tions.com and UModels.com judged
the contest in which four men and
four women were chosen to appear
in a Michigan Models calender to be
sold at local books stores. The mod-
els will receive all profits from the
calenders. They were also awarded
cash prizes.
All contestants were awarded free
on-line portfolios for participating.
Although the contest required no pre-
vious modeling experience, several of
the models have done some modeling.
LSA sophomore HanJo Kin said the
competition and the services UMod-
els.com offers is a good alternative to
other modeling he has done while
away from school.
"I used to model before for a com-
pany in New York. But this is UModel
- it is done on the Internet, so you
can do it at school and make a lot of
money. I'm just going to have fun
tonight," he said.
LSA freshman Nicole Baker was a
1997 contestant in the Miss Michigan
Teen Pageant contestant.
Baker said although she does not
plan to pursue a career in modeling,
"the experience tonight will help her
along the way" in other paths she pur-
sues.
Contestants who did not take the
runway at Rick's had the opportunity
to participate in an online modeling
contest that students may vote on if
they visit UConnections.com. The
winner of the online contest will be the
fifth individual to appear in the Michi-
gan Models calender.

Provost of Academic Affairs Lester
Monts said the exam schedule is created
with input from the Office of the Registrar,
the Office of New Student Programs, Office
of Student Affairs, University Housing,
deans of the schools and colleges, the Acad-
emic Services Board and Financial Opera-
tions.
Based on the information obtained from
these units and offices, the office of Academic
Affairs is charged with preparing the calendar
for consideration by the provost who submits it

for final approval by the University Board of
Regents, Monts said.
"The minimum number of class days
required by the University's accrediting agency,
North Central Association and that the winter
term must end in time to hold commencement
on a weekend" are a number of factors that
influence the decision-making process Monts
said in a written statement.
In a written statement to the faculty, Univer-
sity Provost Nancy Cantor said "every reason-
able effort should be made to help students

avoid negative academic consequences when
their religious obligations conflict with acade-
mic requirements.
"When such conflicts do occur with regard
to class attendance or the scheduling of exami-
nations, it is my expectation that faculty will
make alternative arrangements when students
request them. Such alternative arrangements
should not unduly inconvenience other students
or faculty,"she said.
"It is important for students to inform the
instructor if they expect to be relieved from the

exam," LSA Director of Student Academic
Affairs Philip Gorman said.
But that "such alternative arrangements
should not unduly inconvenience other students
or faculty," Cantor said.
For Jewish students remaining at the Uni-
versity during exams, "Hillel provides
kosher meals and are available for students
wishing to observe the holiday in Ann
Arbor' Katz said.
The University calendar will be similar next
year since Easter will occur late in April.

MASSAGE
Continued from Page 2.
tors have started to prick up their ears and
notice," Akkeros said.
"Hippocrates, who has been regarded as the
father of all medicine, was one of the first to
emphasize the power of touch and the need for
touch in order to learn the healing mecha-
nisms," she said. "Somehow, the crossover
between this ancient form of therapy and modern
medicine was never made and it would be cool if
doctors now got this."
Akkeros also performs esoteric healing, in
which she uses her hands and "inner percep-
tion," to examine the human energy fields and
inspect for certain types of blockages within
the fields.
During a session of esoteric healing, Akkeros

said she uses her perception and energetic "aura"~
to "fork out the blocked energy" without touch-
ing the patient's body.
It was this type of massage and therapy that
cured Ann Arbor resident Lorrie White's 7-month-
old daughter, Alena, of infantile seizures, which
were as frequent as eight to 20 episodes a night.
What prominent pediatric neurologists at the
University Hospitals told her was "generally
incurable" epilepsy was warded off by Akkeros'
sessions of massage, esoteric and cranial sacral
or a cerebral fluid based massage to the skull,
White said.
"Laurie (Akkeros) found where Alena's energy
was blocked. For Alena, it turned out that her
extremities and basic center were constricted,"
White said.
"After one week of treatment, she started
showing signs of improvement by vocalizing cer-

"somehow, the crossover between this ancient
form of therapy and modern medicine was never
made.
- Laurie Akkeros
Massage therapist

tain sounds and making certain motions when
Laurie worked with her throat and arms.
"The most astonishing outcome was that after
the treatment, Alena has not had any seizures at
night again and she is almost 4-years-old now,"
she said.
Forms of massage therapy include the clas-
sic Swedish style with long, connected
strokes; sports massages for joint or muscle

problems; deep kneading strokes using the
forearms in the Hawaiian lomi-lomi massage;
neuromuscular massage; Shiatsu, which uses
pressure points in body to release energy and
Rolfing - named after German massage
therapist Ida Rolf for her work in traeger, the
rhythmic rocking of body for relaxation.
Prices may range from $40 to $60 per session
at clinics in the Ann Arbor area.

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