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April 07, 2000 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-04-07

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 7, 2000 - 9

-'Cat'
By Gabe Fajuri
Daily Arts Editor

croons at Pontiac's Mill St. Entry tonight

Enigmatic. That's probably the
best way to describe Cat Power.
As if the band's name wasn't
intriguing enough, the woman
behind the metaphoric lyrics and
droopy ballads is even more of a

cuiosity.
A band of one
Cat Power
Mill St. Entry
Tonight at 8 p.m.

(ala Trent Reznor,
some might
say), Chan Mar-
shall performs
and records
under the name
Cat Power, and
tonight, will be
appearing in
Pontiac at the
all too often
under-used Mill
Street Entry
venue in the
basement of
Clutch Cargo's.
M ar s h al

a fascinating, if hard to understand
woman.
Since the release of "Moon Pix,"
(much of which was written to ward
off the voices in her head) Marshall
has made a lot of noise with lovers
of a certain "softer" sound that she's
become known for. Tagged by crit-
ics for her heart-twisting melodies
and lyrics, Marshall released the
follow-up to "Moon Pix," entitled
"The Covers Record" a few weeks
ago.
The name of the record is the per-
fect clue as to its subject matter,
and consequently, Cat Power's live
performances on this tour. "The
show will be all of the new record
and about six or seven others," Mar-
shall said in a recent interview with
The Michigan Daily.
"The Covers Record" is an eclec-
tic mix of music selected by Mar-
shall from the repertoires of eleven
other artists, some famous and oth-
ers not so. The songs, all given a
unique, toned-down Cat Power
treatement, range from well known
Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan num-
bers to small time artists like Nina
Simone and Smog.
Marshall didn't really have a for-
mula when it came to selecting
tracks for inclusion on the album.
"All the well known stuff like 'Sat-
isfaction' are ones that I've known
for years," Marshall said. Tonight's
set may also include several covers
that didn't make it on the album.
"Expect to hear songs from Fleet-
wood Mac, John Lee Hooker and
'Werewolf,' a Michael Hurley
song," Marshall said.
And though nearly the entire
record will be played tonight, none

of the songs will sound anything
like what those familiar with the
original versions of the material
might expect. There's no drumset to
back Marshall when she plays The
Rolling Stones standard "(1 Can't
Get No) Satisfaction," not to men-
tion the fact that there won't be
another musician on stage with her.

As a matter of fact, on this tour,
there's only one person Marshall is
bringing along for the ride - her
boyfriend. The two will be criss-
crossing the country for the next
few months.
Marshall's sets on this tour gener-
ally last over an hour and will be
played either on acoustic guitar or

piano, Marshall's first instrument
- her father was a professional
piano player.
Cat Power's live shows haven't
always been noted for being the
greatest, most entertaning show in
town. Rumors have been circulating
for the past couple of years that
after a particularly harrowing expe-
rience in New York, Marshall sang
much of the set with her back to the
crowd and seriously considered
ending her musical career immedi-
ately thereafter.

Thankfully, she chose not to.
For those unfamiliar with Cat
Power and still interested in attend-
ing tonight's show, tickets are still
available. It'll also help attendees
(fans or not) "If they have low
expectations. It'll be a better show
for them," Marshall said.
Whatever the case, playing in a
setting where she'll be stripped
down to bare musical bones, Chan
Marshall will have every opportuni-
ty to make sense of the enigmatic
entity that is Cat Power.

who's first name is pronounced
Shaun,' is far from the typical
singer-songwriter.
Signed to indie giant Matador
Records, Cat Power debuted under
its banner in 1996 with the
acclaimed release "What Would the
Community Think?" Cat Power's
subsequent record, 1998's "Moon
Pix," recorded with the rythym sec-
tion of the Dirty Three over the
course of two weeks in Australia,
catapulted Marshall into pseudo
indie-folk rock stardom.
The eleven songs on that release
seemed both relevant and unbeliev-
ably emotinally at the same time, a
semi-sedated look inside the soul of

f

Mikado flirts about
at the Mendelssohn

By Rosemary Metz
Daily Arts Writer
The city of Titipu, despite its alluring
name, cannot be found on any map of
Japan. However, Titipu is the location
for one of the most popular and uproar-
ious musical creations of WS. Gilbert
and Arthur Sullivan, "The Mikado:'
Presented by the University's Gilbert
and Sullivan Society, the show is part of
their twice yearly re-visit to the G&S
canon.
The highly improbable story line
revolves around an ancient Japanese
edict that forbade male flirting. If such
a flirter were
arrested, he
would be given
the choice to
The marry the object
Mikado of his flirtation,
Mendelssohn or to be behead-
Theatre ed. Nanki-Poo,
April6th tothe 9th the son of the
Mikado (the
Emperor) is
accused of flirt-
ing with an elder-
ly court lady,
Katisha. His
aversion to mar-
riage to this woman prompts Nanki-Poo
to run away from his father and join the
Titipu town band. While in the band, he
meets and falls in love with Yum-Yum,
who is not free to marry, as she is the
ward of Ko-Ko, the town tailor.
In this complicated and twisting plot,
Ko-Ko has been elevated by the Mikdo
to the position of Lord High Execution-
er, and plans to marry Yum-Yum him-
self. An execution is feigned, since
*another ancient Japanese law is uncov-
ered which dictates that, in the case of a
beheaded spouse, his wife must be

buried alive. The course of true love
never runs smooth, as this play graphi-
cally points out. But in the end, these
insurmountable conflicts become
resolved, resulting in an exultant finale.
Director Margie Warrick recalled a
"jinx" that has seemed to accompany
this production in UMGASS history.
When "The Mikado" was initially pre-
sented in 1947 as the very first play per-
formed by UMGASS, the actress
portraying Yum Yum phoned in on
opening night to tell the director that
she would be attending a fraternity
party and could not appear that
evening. The result of that conversation
has been "lost in antiquity," Warrick
said. In November 1963, the production
was cancelled due to the assassination
of President John F Kennedy. The cur-
rent cast hasn't allowed this troubled
history to worry them. Warrick laughed
and said "it's only a jinx, right?"
Warrick serves as president of the
Friends of the G & S Society in Ann
Arbor, which was formed in 1963 fol-
lowing the financially disastrous cancel-
lation of "The Mikado." Warrick
proudly points out that all UMGASS
production casts are composed of stu-
dents and local residents. More than half
of the membership has been dedicated to
students, thus retaining the traditional
"Town and Gown" flavor of productions.
For this particular production of "The
Mikado," costume designer Marilyn
Gouin has created striking stage appar-
el. Teal, aquamarine maroon costumes
catch the eye in the opening scene as
the male chorus sing about the flirtation
edict. Female characters wear silken
kimonos in pale pastels with delicate
flowery etchings. All of these effects
combine to bring to life, again, a musi-
cal story of events in the imaginary
town of Titipu.

Courtesy of Matador
Chan Marshall Is Cat Power. Cat Power is Chan Marshall. She swings both ways.
;o
GOLDEN KEY WOULD LIKE TO
CONGRATULATE ITS RECOGNIZED
SOPHOMORES AND TO REMIND THEM
OF THE RECOGNITION CEREMONY,
SUNDAY
1:00PM
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM
\E

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCH OOL OF M USIC 104
MUSICAL THEATRE DEPARTMENT: Cabaret
Thursday-Sunday, April 6-9, (Thur-Sat 8:00 PM; Sun 2:00)
Power Center
Music by John Kander, Lyrics by Fred Ebb, Book by Joe Masteroff
"Cabaret" became a landmark at its Broadway opening in 1967, won eight Tony
awards and in 1972 was made into a movie that won eight Oscars. For tickets and
further information, call League Ticket Office at 764-0450.
CREATIVE ARTS ORCHESTRA
Thursday, April 6,8:00 PM
Rackham Auditorium
Edward Sarath, director.
CONCERT AND SYMPHONY BAND
Friday, April 7,8:00 PM
Hill Auditorium
H. Robert Reynolds and James R. Tapia, conductors
Kevin Geraldi, guest conductor / Alan Huckleberry, piano soloist
works by Ellwood Derr, Paul Hindemith and Ingolf Dahl.
DANCE DEPARTMENT:
Choreograyhic Production & Design Performance

Saturday, April8, 8:00 PM
Betty Pease Studio Theatre
MEN'S GLEE CLUB

ALL-STAR GARAGE SOUL FROM BURLINGTON, VI
FEA TURING
JON FISHMAN DAN ARCHER
FROM PHISH JON MOORE
PHIL ABAIR AARON HERSEY
THIS SUNDAY APRIL 9 " BLIND PIG " DOORS 8PM

U

-U

Saturday, April 8, 8:00 PM
Hill Auditorium
Jerry Blackstone, conductor. Tickets available t. or by calling, 734-764-1448.
CONTEMPORARY DIRECT...'
Saturday, April 8, 8:00 PM
Rackham Auditorium
Bright Sheng, conductor
" Cheating, Lying, Stealing, David Lang " f ur Movemnnts for Piano Trio, Bright
Sheng " Chamber Symphony, John Adam:
RECITAL SERIES: The Complte Bach Organ Works:
James Kibbie, organ
Sunday, April 9, 4:00 PM
Blanche Anderson Moore Htl
Program #8: The Complete Organ Works oQfJohann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
presented in 18 recitals in o&srvarice of thi 250th anniversary of the composer's
death. www.umich.edu/~
CAMPUS BAND
Sunday, April 9,4:00 PM
Hill Auditorium
Stuart Sims & Miller Asbill, eonduc r s
VOCAL ARTS LAB
Monday, April 10, 6:30 PM
Britton Recital Hall '
EARLY MUSIC ENSEM
Monday, April 10, 8:00 PM
Blanche Anderson Moore Hall
Ed Parmentier, Director
Motets by J.S. Bach and W.|: d drigals by Luzzaschi, Chamber works by
Schutz, and Sonatas by J.S Sach
UNIVERSITY CHOIR:
Tuesday, April 11, 8:00 PM
Hill Auditorium
Theodore Morrison, conductor
DIGITAL MUSIC ENSEMBLE
Tuesday, April 11, 9:00 PM
Media Union
" Socrate, Erik Satie " Furniture Music, Erik Satie " Four Organs, Steve Reich.
UNIVERSITY PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA
Wednesday, April 12, 8:00 PM
Hill Auditorium
Rossen Milanov, conductor
" Symphonic Metamorphoses, Hindemith " Piano Concerto, op.38, Christopher
Atzinger, soloist (99-00 Concerto winner), Barber
GUEST MASTERCLASS:
C~v,.a - 1A A A M...LI"1.. QA'sr. - - - - - - -i

life is disappointing?
In here life is Beautiful... Come to the

BACK AFTER LAST YEAR'S KILLER SHOW
lot c x I"

Music by John Kander
Lyrics by Fred Ebb
Book by Joe Masteroff
Direction & Choreography
by Linda Goodrich

FEATURING MEMBERS OF JERRY GARCIA Bi
FRIDAY APRIL 21 " MAJESTIC * DOORS 9PM

m

11

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