100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 2000 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TL._. AA'_L^...w___.. T1._'. k_- __ ._!__ fa____t_ Ili

LOCAL/ TATEThe Michigan Daily - Friday, March 31, 2000- 5
*Exhibit to reveal suffering o Chilean survivors

J

By Mahvish Khan
For the Daily
While studying abroad for a year in Chile,
LSA senior Hannah Meyers took a closer look
at a piece of history she says has been absent
from books she's used in the classroom.
As a political science and Latin American
studies double concentrator, Meyers said she
questions why she has never formally studied
the victims and their families who suffered
under the regime of dictator General Augusto
Pinochet.
Pinochet overthrew President Salvador
Allende in 1973, and after seizing power,
began the systemat'c elimination of opposition,

ushering in a period of oppression and terror.
"If I am not learning anything about this his-
tory by studying these two fields, then who is?
Nobody," Meyers said.
In an effort to shed light on the voices of
those who have suffered and remained silent,
Meyers sought out the "mothers of the disap-
peared," who have become a symbol of
courage in the face of tyranny after Pinochet's
coup.
After photographing and recording the sto-
ries of more than 30 victims and survivors of
torture, detention and exile, Meyers plans to
display a photo exhibit of Chilean survivors as
her senior thesis.
Meyers parallels the Pinochet regime

with Nazi Germany, referring to the atroci-
ties that ensued in Chile as a "miniature
holocaust." She said individuals associated
with the former president or any form of
opposition were arrested, tortured, exiled or
executed. It is estimated that more than
1,000 individuals simply disappeared. It is
for these victims that the "mothers" began
their protests.
She said that despite the nation's transition to
democracy, there is still no information regard-
ing the fate of those who disappeared.
"The culture as a whole does not discuss the
regime, they do not teach it ... the young do
not know about it, it's all kept very quiet - out
of fear," she said.

Meyers said she hopes that from her
research, students will learn about the dictator-
ship and understand that "the Chilean experi-
ences during this regime are a history of
atrocities that need to be recognized in an
effort to prevent its repetition."
Residential College Lecturer Elaina Moya-
Raggio, who helped with the project, said she
was impressed with Meyers' work. "It has been
a pleasure to work with her," she said. "She has
exhibited such a degree of commitment to the
work she has done in Chile. I find that excep-
tional."
Meyers said she believes her exhibit, which
includes 36 portraits as well as bilingual
excerpts of interviews she conducted with sur-

vivors - will record the memories of those
effected without outside interpretation.
"I feel that a lot of students don't know
about these atrocities. The majority of us have
been fortunate enough never to have under-
gone anything like this," Meyers said. "I
wanted to do the best that I could to bring it
here."
By producing this exhibit, Meyers said she is
"honoring (the victims) the best that I know
how ... These are incredibly amazing and
strong individuals."
The exhibition, titled "The Courage to
Remember," will open Saturday and remain on
display until April 15 in the third floor gallery
of the Rackham School for Graduate Studies.

.Defendants in GHB trial
receive prison sentences

DETROIT (AP) - Calling their
actions "deplorable," a judge ordered
prison terms yesterday for four men
convicted in one of the nation's first tri-
*Is involving a death linked to a date-
rape drug.
Circuit Judge Maggie Drake sen-
tenced three men convicted of involun-
tary manslaughter to up to the
maximum 15 years in prison. A fourth
man convicted of being an accessory to
manslaughter after the fact was ordered
to spend up to five years behind bars.
The four were convicted March 14 in
Samantha Reid's death Jan. 17, 1999, a
day after the 15-year-old Rockwood girl

ingested GHB slipped into her soft
drink during a Detroit-area party with
the defendants.
A friend of Samantha's, Melanie Sin-
done, now 16, also ingested the drug,
was briefly comatose, but survived.
Forty-five people addressed Drake
during the four-hour hearing, from the
apologetic defendants and their lenien-
cy-seeking attorneys to the prosecutor
and 19 people who spoke for the vic-
tims' families, including Samantha's
mother Judi Clark.
"Since her death, people ask me how
many children I have, and I don't know
how to answer," said Clark, who wore a

T-shirt with her daughter's name
scrawled in the middle of a rainbow
heart, before asking for the harshest
punishment. "Your Honor, the nation's
watching today. Your sentence is more
than a sentence, it's an overdue mes-
sage," she said.
Afterward, Clark exchanged words
with one of two jurors who had voted to
convict Joshua Cole, but who asked
Drake for mercy yesterday.
Cole, who had his own jury as the
only defendant to have confessed,
admitted he spiked the drinks with what
he said he thought was a harmless
intoxicant.

I

_______________ a

Apply now at
the Law Library
*non-Law
Students
*Law Students
*S.I. Students
Apply in person: Room S-180
in the Law Library's under-
ground addition, 8-noon and
1-5 Monday through Friday.
AA/EOE

Check Us Out 1t
SIn www.homecityice.com
'Great Job Opportunities!!
Hiring Students Part-Time NOW and Full-Time During Summer & Breaks
Flexible Hours & GREAT PAY!
We offer 10-40+ hours/week
Route Delivery & Packaging Positions
$6.00-$10.00per hour
734-955-9094
Located just minutes from Campus!
We Also Have Facilities in Other Cities, Call Us!
.xmgton.KY 1809333575 Dayom)Sprangftsdd14W00283-511
L~imaucyrus I-M0-94-0529 Towedo 1-4w-89807O
Cb*w~~nCatoNEn. lK7-804 0880 Pisburgh 1-800-283.4423
Cem fAeN.Kenicky 1-800-288-4040 WstVgima. 1800-645.4423
MnW- -s8 wW t-800-894-0529 S8,rniOh o 1-80-545.4423
No Experience Necessary Train in one{aglity during school and work in
another daring summer break We offerSchedule Flexibility. Start training _QW.
Schedule an Interview A.S.A.P. Bring a Friend !
www.homecityice.com

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan