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March 29, 2000 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-03-29

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[
eThe
A'c(
By John Uhl
Daily Music Editor

ARTS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 29, 2000 -9

sound of saxophones:

Ames alive this weekend

CROSSINGS
Continued from Page 5
team. They will be joined by dancer/choreographer Peter Spar-
ling, film/video artist Robert Andersen, composer Andrew
Mead, filmmaker Jonathan Tyman, producer Tom Bray and
Distinguished Senior Research Scientist Fred Bookstein, who
is in charge of Internet connections.
"What's interesting about Border Crossings," Tillinghast
said, "is that it is such an unusual combination of the arts." On
top of the immense variety, a unique form of art coming from
biomedical research will be an added source of appeal. Book-
stein, for the second time ever, will bring EdgeWarp, a pro-
gram originally developed to map brain activity, to the art
world.
Tillinghast said that the cast refers to this creation as "danc-
ing grids." These grids will be projected onto a central screen

and three panels on either side of the stage. The panels consist
of the wall spaces between pilasters that are set into the walls
of the auditorium.
"Here you have geometrical abstract motion that mimics the
human body in dance," Tillinghast said. As the several art
forms are being presented, they are meant to bounce off each
other and interact, just as an entangled web. These grids wil be
another string in this complicated, yet wondrous web.
In addition, dancers from Sparling's Company will be per-
forming live at a stage in the Media Union. Their images will
be projected into Rackham over a form of Internet access
called Internet2 developed by Bray.
As if these elements weren't impressive enough, the otside
of the building also plays a part in the performance. Through
the technical knowledge of Andersen, the exterior of Rackham
Auditorium will be completely lit. "It'll be a visual show even
for those outside of the building, Tillinghast said.

* It sounds like spring in Ann
Arbor, but instead of chirping birds
and the crack of the bat, it's music
that's in the air - and lots of it.
In the coming days and nights,
the city will play host to several
unique musicians, from far-out sax-
ophonists to Canadian folkies.
Ann Arbor jazz fans will have a
rare opportunity this weekend to see
two of the major saxophone innova-
tors of the last few decades.
Considering that many avant-
garde improvisers work with
abstraction, clusters of tones and
overtones that don't necessarily
establish a standard conception of
melody, harmony or rhythm, tenor
saxophonist David Murray's playing
can be surprisingly melodic. His
solos do often progress to climactic
shrieks and rapid runs of obscure
armonic flurry. Yet he'll take sev-
Sral bars of Coltrane-esque sheets
of sound and rearrange them to his
liking, carving a remarkably sensi-
ble pattern out of what some may
call noise.
Murray's influence has stretched
from the realms of the jazz quartet,
octet, big band, the rowdy junction
of tenor saxophone and organ to his
work as a founding member of the
World Saxophone Quartet. The
"Village Voice" voted him musician
of the decade for the 1980s.
Joining him tonight at Kerrytown
Concert House will be Chicago per-
cussionist Kahil EI'Zabar, who is a
member of the Association for the
Advancement of Creative Musicians
(the AACM is an organization of

tory group was rare in jazz and the
music of Monk in particular was still
considered rather eccentric.
This mutual appreciation for Monk's
music brought Lacy and Rudd together
last summer to record the recently
released album "Monk's Dream," a
compilation of compositions by Monk,
Lacy and one by Duke Ellington.

Photo courtesy of Kerrytown concert House
David Murray, saxophonist supreme.
musicians notable for promoting
outside the lines jazz) and has per-
formed with artists as disparate as
Dizzy Gillespie, Henry Threadgill,
Stevie Wonder and Paul Simon.
Like Murray, Steve Lacy's play-
ing generally does not find itself
completely detached from structure.
Schooled by iconoclastic
pianist/composer Thelonious Monk,
Lacy prefers to dabble with harmo-
ny and rhythm. A major figure on
the jazz scene since the sixties,
Lacy has been the major proponent
of the soprano saxophone since
Coltrane famously picked the
instrument up to play "My Favorite
Things."
Friday and Saturday evening, for
two shows each night, Lacy will be
joined by equally respected trombon-
ist Roswell Rudd. Lacy and Rudd
have collaborated on and off since the
late fifties. From 1961-1964, the two
formed the innovative School Days
quartet, which befuddled the jazz
world by exclusively playing Monk
tunes. At that time, any sort of reper-

4

t
"v
1 r
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4RBO
The University of Michigan-Dearborn
invites you to be a guest student for the
Summer 2000 semester. We have three
options to accommodate students who are
home for summer vacation.
Full Term May 8 -August 29
Half Term I May 8 - June 30
Half Term II July 5 -August 29
For information please call the Office
of Admissions and Orientation today, L
3 13-593-5100, to speak with an admissions
counselor.
Discover the Michigan Advantage
during the summer!
The University of Michigan-Dearborn
Office of Admissions and Orientation
4901 Evergreen Road
Dearborn, Michigan 48128-1491

CAMP FOWLER
SUMMER CAMP FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH
DEVELOPMENTALgDISABILITIES
June 12-August 18
SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR:
COUNSELOR
OUTDOOR EDUCATION
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EQUESTRIAN INSTRUCTOR
CREATIVE ARTS
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LIFEGUARDS
OUTDOOR LIVING
MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN SOMEONE'S LIFE
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CALL: 517-673-2050 FAX: 517-673-6355
EMAIL: programs@thefowlercenter.org
WRITE: 2315 Harmon Lake Rd, Mayville, MI 48744-9737
"THE FOWLER CENTER FOR OUTDOOR LEARNING"

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