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March 29, 2000 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-03-29

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Rock the man down...
The Ark hosts Maritime folk from
Canada's Great Big Sea, a four-man vocal
group that combines traditional sea
O-anties with polished pop rock. 8 p.m

RT

michigandaily.com/arts

WEDNESDAY
MARCH 29, 2000

5

BREAKING 'BORDERS'
Event requireds
Crossng ofinds a

Do Whatever it
Takes' to miss film

By Robyn Melamed
Daily Arts Writer
It all started with a sculpture made
of beeswax.
Jim Cogswell, the artist of this
sculpture, invited fellow Border
Crossings members to his studio in
hopes of starting up a project that
would highlight interactions among
the arts. Part of the group, Cogswell,
Sparling and Bookstein had come
together previously for the 1997 pro-

Border
Crossings
Rackham
Auditorium
Tonight at 8 p.m.
Tickets: Free

duction of
" S e v e n
Enigmas," and
Cogswell and
R i c h a r d
Tillinghast team
taught a class
called "Turning
Points," a course
in collaborative
arts.
These gentle-
men just pon-
dered over
Cogwell's sculp-
tures and dis-
cussed what

formed that evening were the begin-
nings of Border Crossings.
"Collaborating with this group in
particular is very rewarding because
working with another artist is like
having an ideal audience, and here I
have several artists," said Cogswell.
During a portion of the show,
dancer Peter Sparling wears one of
Cogswell's sculptures as a prop.
Cogswell thinks this is very exciting.
"When Peter as a dancer is using (my
sculpture), he is putting his own
experience in it. I've reached some-
body and I can read that in another
form," he said.
Cogswell, although he feels that
"solitude is an important part of life,"
said working with others has been a
key to his growth as an artist.
Luckily, he assured, "This is not the
end." Look for more of this team's
talent when the members present
"The Ariel Web" as part of the annu-
al visit by Peter Sparling Dance
Company to the Ann Arbor Summer
Festival. At that performance, they
will certainly catch attention with
their unique, ever-changing style.
It is difficult to summarize the
message of Border Crossings
because it has a different meaning for
each involved member. For Cogswell,
"the piece is about the mystery of life
unfolding and building around the
germ of its existence. It's like a
cocoon -- it wraps and entangles
itself in this stuff and comes out a
butterfly. It's a celebration of the
human imagination," he said.

Courtesy of Dwight Cendrowski
The Border Crossings collaborators span the worlds of poetry, dance and science.
Intersecting 'Borders'

By Matthew Barrett
Daily Film Editor
Do your homework. Gnaw off your
arm. Poke out your eyes. Go to your
8:00 a.m. class. In fact, gnaw off both
your arms, because that pain would pale
in comparison to the hurt that is
"Whatever it Takes," the latest piece of
low-level teen coming-of-age trash to hit
theaters. The movie has nothing much to
say, otherthan the usual true beauty is on
the inside bit.
The film
begins with
Ryan (Shane
Whatever West) and Chrs
it Takes (James Franco)
in a bit of
Grade: F predicament as
At Showcase their high-school
and Quality 16 senior prom
approaches.
Ryan is a nice
guy but not that
cool and Chris is
a cool guy but
not that nice.
Chris is desperate to go to the prom with
Maggie (Marla Sokoloff), who just hap-
pens to be Ryan's next door neighbor
and lifelong best friend (we know this
because the two talk to each other late at
night from the almost-touching bal-
conies between their bedrooms). And
wouldn't you know that Ryan is desper-
ate to go to prom with Ashley (Jodi Lyn

they each felt while looking at the
artwork. Cogswell thinks of his
sculptures in forms of "grids, webs,
twistings, and turnings."
Tillinghast had a different thought.
"When. I look at that," he said, as he
pointed to one of the sculptures, "it
looks like a shell that some animal
has vacated."
The variety of thoughts that

By Robyn Melamed
Daily Arts Writer
If there were any possible way to
describe Border Crossings in a single
word, it would be collaboration. For one
night, the magic of song, dance, poetry,
sculpture, drawing, video and Internet
technology will be brought together in
this fantastically unique performance.
Border Crossings 2000 is the second
production of what the creators hope
will become an annual event. The show
originated as an idea by Richard
Tillinghast, a professor of English in
the MFA creative writing program. The
original production featured five poets
performing their poetry accompanied
by live jazz. Tillinghast, in hopes of
bringing poetry in sync with other art
forms, met with the involved artists.
They brainstormed ideas by examining
the sculptures of Jim Cogwell, an asso-
ciate professor at the School of Art &
Design.
This modernistic event will be bro-
ken into two distinct parts. The first
section, titled "Poets Crossing
Borders," will feature the music of duo
William Bolcom, pianist and Pulitzer

Prize-winning composer, and mezzo-
soprano John Morris. Bolcom and
Morris will be performing selections
from the theatre, cabaret, vaudeville
and two parlor ballads. This married
pair has performed all over the world to
sold-out audiences, and has recorded
20 albums together.
The second part, "The Ariel Web,"
displays eclectic talent. Tillinghast, who
will be reading poetry written particu-
larly for this production, and Cogswell,
whose sculpture will act as a prop and
whose drawings will also be shared, are
only the beginning of the Arie Web
See CROSSINGS, Page 9

courtesy of Buena Vista Pictures
Teen flick madness!
O'Keefe), who just happens to be
friends with Chris. And so the two guys
develop a scheme to set each other up
with their dream girl.
Throughout the story we can never
really see why, other than the fact that
she's beautiful, Ryan is so attracted to
Ashley, considering he's supposed to be
a nice and sensitive guy (he even plays
the accordion). But lust beats trust and
this kind and caring person knifes his
best friend in the back without even a
second thought so that he can hook it up
with the hottest girl in school. As we
might expect, Ryan begins to see his
grave mistake as the story progresses
and realizes that it's just not cool that
Chris is going to pull the old "nail and
bail" on Maggie.
See WHATEVER, Page 8

a

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