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2B - The Michigan Daily --- SportsMonday - March 6, 2000

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY
Edited by Michael Kern and Ryan C. Moloney
Hockey ices best season ever
Indiana continues to be the Michigan al title game.
men's hockey club's nemesis as it tries to Michigan swept through the first
build toward one of the strongest pro- round tournament pool, following a 5-1
grams in the nation. victory over San Jose State on
Saturday, the Hoosiers downed the Wednesday with a 12-4 drubbing of
Wolverines in the semi-finals of the Palmer on Thursday and 7-3 thrashing of
ACHA National Championship, 3-2. Stony Brook on Friday.
The final four appearance capped "We were ranked number one in our
Michigan's finest season since gaining region and our pool and thought we had
club status in 1995. The Wolverines fin- a good chance to win it," Kiehler said.
ished the season ranked third in the Despite the top-ranking in the nation
nation with a record of 12-2-2 in the going into the MCHL tournament this
MCHL and 20-4-2 overall. season, Michigan was downed 5-2 by
"This is everything we hoped the club the Hoosiers in the semi-finals of con-
would become," club president and cap- ference tournament, after finishing third
tain Jason Kiehler said. "It's great that in the regular season.
every year we've been able to build on "They are just a team that matches up
the year before." well against us," Kiehler said. "We beat
The Hoosiers lost to Miami (Ohio) - them a couple times this year but haven't
the same team that beat them for the been able to get past them."
MCHL tournament title - in the nation- - Michael Kern
Skating spins through nationals

Men's college basketball

i

tyle[1 to CUIICVV V;ItMeryau

EAST
Boston College 79, Villanova 67
Fordham 88, Rhode Island 81, OT
Harvard 74, Cornell 60
La Salle 67, Duquesne 58
Notre Daine 77, Georgetown 54
Pennsylvania 69, Yale 52
Princeton 85, Brown 57
SOUTH
Georgia Tech 85, Clemson 69
LSU 64, Mississippi 60
Memphis 91, South Florida 72
Mississippi State 92, Alabama 70
South Carolina 77, Vanderbilt 72
Virginia Tech 64, Dayton 52
MIDWEST
DePaul 82, Southern Mississippi 51
Illinois 73, Northwestern 44
Iowa 86, Penn State 83
Ohio State 82, Minnesota 72
Texas 99, Kansas State 70
SOUTHWEST
Louisville 88, Houston 74
Oklahoma 69, Oklahonya State 56
San Jose State 70, UTEP 61
Texas A&M 83, Nebraska 76, CT
Tulsa 83, SMU 78, 2OT
FAR WEST
Arizona State 77, Oregon State 74, CT
California 86, Southern California 73
Colorado 88, Texas Tech 67
Colorado State 79, Wyoming 78
Long Beach State 100, Cal Poly-SLO 92
Oregon 86, Arizona 81
UNLV 80, New Mexico 67
Washington 64, Washington State 60
TOURNAMENT PLAY
A\MERICA EA ST CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
Delaware 79, Towson 69
Drexel 71, Vermont 59
Hlofstra 80, Boston U. 62
Maine 80, Hartford 63
BlG SOUTH CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP
Winthrop 75, N.C.-Asheville 62
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
QUARTERFINALS
George Mason 75, American 58
James Madison 84, William & Mary 73
N.CWilmington 66, Virginia-Commonwealth 57
Richmond 67, Old Dominion 55
METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
Fairfield 67, Manhattan 50
lona 64, Rider 59
Niagara 83, Marist 65
Siena 82, Canisius 71
MIDWESTERN COLLEGIATE CONFERENCE
First Round
Butler 61, Loyola, i1l. 57

Detroit 64, Wright State 59
I11.-Chicago 70, Cleveland State 54
Wisc.-Milwaukee 62, Wisc.-Green Bay 58
MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE
QUA RTERFINALS
Creighton 71, Bradley 62
Indiana State 57, Wichita State 50
Southem Illinois 75, Evansville 63
SW Missouri State 62, Drake 50
NORTHEAST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Central Conn. St. 83, St. Francis, NY 73
Robert Morris 80, Mount St. Mary's 61
OHIO VALLEY CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Murray State 89, Eastern Illinois 70
Southeast Missouri 78, Middle Tennessee 60
PATRIOT LEAGUE
FIRST ROUND
Colgate 58, Holy Cross 49
Lafayette 71, Army 45
Lehigh 73, Bucknell 62
SOUTHERN CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Appalachian State 60, Furman 56
College of Charleston 74, Wofford 64
SUN BELT CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
New Orleans 67, Denver 65
South Alabama 74, Arkansas- Little Rock 58
TRANS AlERICA ATumEC TaURNAMLENT
Samford 78, Central Florida 69
WEST COAST CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Gonzaga 76, St. Mary's, Cal. 49
Pepperdine 83, Loyola Marymount 49
San Diego 56, Portland 52
Santa Clara 63, San Francisco 48
AP basketball poll
Associated Press Top 25, Feb. 28
(first-place votes in parentheses)

arbeudctrzm zt
ATHLETE OF THE WEEI

Who: Scott Vetere
Hometown: Pennsburg, Penn.
High School: Quakertown

Sport: Gymnastics
Year: Sophomore

Why: Set Michigan all-around record with 58.55, the second-highest
total ever in the NCAA ... set three event school records on the still
rings, vault and floor exercise ... won five events in two meets.
Background: 1999 Big Ten Freshman of the Year ... NCAA All-American
... Michigan pommel horse record-holder (9.875) ... member U.S.
National Team ... favorite food is "anything my dad makes." . Vetere

The women's precision skating club
knew the road would be tough to repeat
as national champions, and it was. At the
National Synchronized Skating
Championships in Plymouth this week-
end, the collegiate level defending cham-
pions took an enormous leap forward by
competing in the senior level, the highest
level possible.
In a senior level stacked with only
prestigious skating clubs and varsity
teams, the women finished a respectable
10th out of 16. In addition, only one
other college team finished ahead of the
women. By placing in the top ten, the
Wolverines took the first steps toward
elite status.
"It was tough, but we skated with our
hearts, and we had to start to build a
name for ourselves somewhere," club
media liaison Tami Tarnow said.
The Wolverines also competed in the
collegiate level again. In that level, the
women finished third out of a field of 10
- an unexpected surprise.
Michigan did not know they would
compete in the collegiate level until
three weeks ago. In addition, only 12 out
of the 24 skaters competed, because of

regulations regarding dual competitions.
Despite this, the women were able to
medal, and finish ahead of in-state rivals
Michigan State and Western Michigan
- establishing themselves as the pre-
mier college skating team in the state of
Michigan, despite its club status.
The steady improvement shown by the
team mirrored the growing experience of
its members. Half of the club was new
and lacked experience skating together.
The women started the year with an
eighth-place finish in the collegiate level
and a 12th-place showing in the senior
level at Fraser. That was followed by a
fifth-place finish in both levels at the
Midwestern Sectionals. But the best
was vet to come, as the women came
back with an impressive showing at the
Tri-States Meet three weeks ago. The
Wolverines finished first overall in both
the senior and collegiate levels.
As a team, the season is officially
over, but there is still an individual com-
petition in March.
The team will be losing seven seniors
this year but hope to counteract that loss
through recruiting.
- Albert Kim

E-East
Miami
New Yok
Philadelphia
Orando
New Jersey
Bo8ston
Washington
E.Central
Indiana
Toronto
S Charlotte
i Detroit
Milwaukee
cleveland
Atlanta
Chicago
W-Midwest
Utah
San Antonio
Minnesota
.Deriver
Dallas
Houston
Vancouver
W-Pacific
*LA Lakers
Portland
Phoenix
Seattle
Sacramento

NBA Standings
W L PCT GB HOME AWAY STK.
37 21 .638 - 22-6 15-15 Won 1
35 22 .614 1.5 24.6 11-16 Lost 1.
3325 .569 4 20-10 13-15 Won 3
2731.466 10 15-13 1248 Won 2
24 35.407135 17-12 7-23 Lost 1
23 35.397 1.4 17-11: 6-24 Lost 4
1841 .30519.5 12-17 6-24 Won 1
W L PCT GB HOME AWAY STK
39 19 .672 - 26-2 13-17 Lost 2
,32 25.561 6.5 20411 12-14 Won 4
3127 .534 8 22-8 9-19 Lost 2
28 30.483 11.20-9 &-21 Lost 3
28 31 .47511.5 15-15 13-16 Lost 2
2434.414 15 18-11 6-23 Won 2
2334 .40415.5 1612 7-22 Lost 1
1245 21126.5 8-21 4-24 Lost7

W-Central
St. Louis
Detroit
Nashville
chicago,
Edmonton
Colorado
Calgary
Vancouver
W Pacific'
Dallas
Phoenix
Los Angeles
San Jose'
Anaheim
Toronto
Ottawa
Buffalo
Montreal
Boston
-Atlantic
New Jersey
Philadelphia"
Pittsburgh
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Florida
Washington
Carolina
Tampa Say
Atlanta

W L T
42 16 7
38 20 7
22 37 6
2334 7
WL T
25 26 15
30 2710
28 30 7
233012
36 23 6
33 24 7
31 26 8
27 32 8
27 29 10
W LT
35 23 7
.32 22 11
26 30 10
27 31 7
19 29 17
'W L T1
38 21 7
34 1911
27 30 8
2729 10
18 39 8
WL T1
35 26 5
33 2111
15 42 7
12 46 6

RT
0
1
6
2

PTS
91
84
56
55;

RT PTS HOME AWAY
8 73 15-8-9 10-186
1 71 19-10-3 11-17-7
5 68 19-8-5 9-22-2
6 64 13-184 10-128
AT IrS HOME 'AWAY
3 81 18-12-2 1&11-4
1 74 18-11-2 15-13-5
3 73 16-11-4 15-15-4
7 69 15-15-2 12-17-6
1 65 14-13-6 13-16-4
RT ITS HOME AWAY
3 80 22-8-5 13-15-2
2 77 18-9-5 14-136
2 64 16-12-5 10-185
3 64 14-14-5 1317-2
4 59 9-15-9 10-14-8

NHL Standings

HOME AWAY
20-&4 22-8-3
24-82 14-12-5
11-18-3 11-19-3
11-19-3 12-154

W L PCT G
37 20 .649 -
3722.627 1
34 24 .586 3.5
26 31.456 11
24 34 .41413.5
2435.407 14
18 40.31019.5
W L PCT GB
4811 .814 -
46127193 1.5
37 21 .63810.5
36 24 .60012.
33 25.56914.5

Team
1. Stanford (70)
2. Cincinnati
3. Arizona
4. Duke
5. Temple
6. Ohio State
7. Michigan State
8. Florida
9. Syracuse
10. Iowa State
11. Tennessee
12. Louisiana State
13. Oklahoma State
14. Indiana
15. Tulsa
16. Texas
17. Maryland
18. St. John's
19. Auburn
20. Purdue
21. Oklahoma
22. Kentucky
23. Kansas
24. Connecticut
25. Illinois

Record
24-1
26-2
24-4
22-4
22-4
20-5
21-7
22-5
23-3
24-4
22-5
23-4
22-4
19-6
26-3
20-7
21-7
20-6
21-6
21-7
22-5
20-8
21-7
19-8
18-8

Pts Pvs
1,750 1
1,658 3
1,597 4
1,488 2
,1,403 8
1,394 6
1,271 5
1,269 9
1,065 13
1,045 17
1,031 7
939 15
900 10
753 16
716 12
699 14
610 19
603 -
542 11
499 21
446 20
445 18
244 23
101 22
74 -

B HOME AWAY STK
23-8 14-12 Won 3
22-7 15-15 Lost 2
S19-11 15-13 Won 2
20.11 6-20 Woni1
5 13-15 11-19 Lost 3
16-15 8-20 Won 3
5 9-19 9-21 Lost 3
B HOME AWAY ST K
27-4 21-7 Won 14
24-4 22-8 Won 1
5 25-5 12-16 Won 3
5 18-9 18-15 Won 1
5 21-6 12-19 Won 1
10-18, 6-23 Lost 1
9-18 3-29 Lost 2
Todays Games:
Orlando at Washngton
Atlanta at Milwau,.e
Toront.o at Portland
New Jersey at San Antonio
Miami at Phoenix
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clipoers
Dallas at Sacramento

RT [TS HOME
5 88 25-6-3
1 80 20-"
6 68 18-8-7
3 67 15.15:4
1 45 9-22-4
RT PTS HOME'
5 80 22-9-3
1 78 18.5-7
0 65 14-13-4
6 43 11-17-4
4 34 8-21-2

AWAY
13-154
14135
9-22-1
12-14-6
9-174
AWAY
1317-2
15-16.4
14-15
4-25.3
4-25-4

Golden State 1641.281
LA Clippers 1247 .203
Yesterdays results:
Urea 88. NEW YORK 79
OR(ANOOx 91. BOSTON 87
TOKOEO 94. VANCOUVER 92
L.A. LAKERS 93. M!A,., 80
CHARLOTTE 100. chicago 94
MINNESOTA 105. SEAMEr 100
cLEVELAND 100, DENVER 92
i )ANA 114. GOLDEN STATE 95

31
36

Yesterday's resutts:
WASHINGTON 2, 8uFFAo 1
CHICAGO 7. PHoErx 3
N.Y. ISoAN Exs 4. PHILADELPHIA 3
OLGn', 5. DALLAS3
CALGARY 2. NEw',kJsn- 2
ANAHEIM 1. NAswwaF0

Today's Games:
Ottawa at BOSTON
Atlanta at Mow'aAL
Toronto at VA'couvE
N.Y. Rangers at SAN )osE

Title time

RECORDS
Continued from Page 1B
best comeback victory I have ever
seen."
Shannon Carrion took the event title
in the two events Michigan did not win,
the floor exercise and the high bar.
"Oklahoma has the talent to be one
of the best teams in the country,"
Golder said before meeting the
Sooners.
The Gauchos finished a distant third,
scoring 213.75.
Prior to traveling to sunny California,
the Wolverines made a stop in
Champaign, Illinois to take on the then
No. 6 Fighting Illini. Although Illinois
posed a legitimate threat to Michigan,
they were easily downed by the
Wolverines. Michigan won all six
events as a team and individually, scor-

ing 230.35 to Illinois' 227.20.
The performance was a very bal-
anced attack, with five gymnasts win-
ning event titles, and nine placing in tl
top five of at least one event.
Vetere again led the team, winning
the all-around with a 56.85, taking titles
in the vault and still rings. Vetere's per-
formances over break will probably
boost him to No. 1 in the all-around
rankings when they come out today.
Zimmerman had the highest score of
the Illinois meet with his 9.925 to win
the parallel bars, he also claimed sec-
ond on the high bar.
With the two meets over sprir4
break, Michigan extended its streak to
four meets scoring over 230.00. The
high scores will pull the Wolverines
even farther away from the rest of the
country in the scoring poll, and should
cement their lead in the coaches poll.

Coaches' basketball poll
Associated Press Top 25, Feb. 28
(first-place votes in parentheses)

Team
1. Stanford (30)
2. Cincinnati (1)
3. Arizona
4. Duke
5. Ohio State
6. Michigan State
7. Temple
8. Florida
9. Syracuse
10. Tennessee
11. Oklahoma State
12. Indiana
13. Auburn
14. Iowa State
15. Texas
16. Louisiana State
17. Tulsa
18. Kentucky
19. Maryland
20. Oklahoma
21. St. John's
22. Purdue
23. Kansas
24. Connecticut
25. Vanderbilt

Record
24-1
25-2
24-4
22-4
20-5
21-7
22-4
22-5
22-3
22-5
22-4
19-6
21-6
24-4
20-7
23-4
26-3
20-8
21-7
22-5
20-6
21-7
21-7
19-8
17-8

Pts
774
740
699
674
599
591
564
529
496
492
443
370
359
353
350
336
326
237
222
214
158
152
131
90
30

Pvs
1
3
4
2
6
5
12
10
11
7
9
14
8
18
15
17
13
16
19
20
25
23
21
22

CHAMPS
Continued from Page 1B
qualifying times.
Four Michigan swimmers, juniors
Chris Thompson and Scott Werner and
sophomores Tim Siciliano and Jeff
Hopwood have guaranteed themselves a
trip to Minneapolis with automatic times
from earlier this season.
The consideration times of senior tri-
captain Mike McWha and freshman
Tony Kurth ensures they will be invited
as well.
"It would take a nightmare" for them
to not get to go, Namesnik said.
Senior tri-captain Josh Trexler has
automatically qualified for the NCAA
Diving Zone Meet from March 10-12.
The results from that meet determine
who will dive in the NCAAs.
Still on the bubble is Michigan's 800-

meter freestyle relay team, but it is a bto-
ble that will likely be popped. Michigan
coach Jon Urbanchek took some swimn-
mers to an invitational in Minnesotat4
ing to get his team some more qualifyipg
times. There is a similar rush around tje
country.
But Namesnik does not anticipate q y
mote individuals or relays to make. the
NCAAs. The lack of a relay team is espe-
cially harmful since they are worth so
many points.
Without them, their chances to
improve on or even maintain their eighth
place of last year is slim.
All the Wolverines headed
Minneapolis, including Trexler, have
experience with the NCAA champi-
onships except the freshman Kurth.
Trexler's first trip to NCAAs last year
netted him honorable mention AL}
America recognition. McWha, Werner
and Hopwood are NCAA Alt-
Americans. Thompson is a four-time All-
American and Siciliano is a three-time
All-American and an NCAA champio
McWha and Hopwood will swim t
events each while the others will swii
ihree times.
Tomorrow, Michigan submits their list
of swimmers with times it believes will
qualify to the NCAA and is officially
notified Thursday about who makes tie
cut.

PETER CORNUE/Daily
Michigan's Tim Siciliano made sure the Wolverines' splash in the Big Ten Championships Feb. 25 and 26 wasn't a small
one. On their home turf, the Wolverines captured the conference title.

rrr r

I I

\C': I lx S1"

Mailing Address:
915 E. Washington Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070
www.umich.edu/~wcorweb/
scor-news@umich.edu

"M ichigamua does hereby eliminate all reference to Native A mnerican cuirure
and pseudo-culture and extensions and parodies thereof u ith the one
exception being the name. Michig*amua, for nou and forever:
-Michigamua 's agreement u-ith the University of Michigan (November I. 1989)
Dear University Community:
The Students of Color Of Rackham SCOR) are tremendously disappointed by the University of Michigan's minimal level of
concern and commitment to fotering a campus climate that is respectful of the rich histories of its students of color.
Specifically, we are writing because we are dismayed by the tepid response to the Students of Color Coalition's (SCC) protest
4f the institutionalized racism evident within the Michigamua Society.
SCOR whole-heartedly supports SCC's actions as it is a strategic response undertaken after failed attempts to work with the
University's administration. While the University's administration may not support such actions, SCOR understands such
action to be necessary. Direct action has been a common thread woven throughout the histories of marginalized peoples. For
without social insurgence, many of us would not be studying at Michigan.-
Further, SCC has demonstrated that Michigamua is in violation of the terms of its 1989 agreement with the University, by
(mis)using artifacts, using stereotypes and caricatures of Native languages, culture, and rituals in official society business.
Contrary to statements made by the University's administration, current members of Michigamua have NOT "disassociated
themselves from any continuing club practices and reference that are offensive to and derogatory of the Native American
community. The nicknames, figurines, inscriptions, and other cultural symbols and references that were found in the current
space are offensive and disrespectful. Given the location of many of these pieces, it is obvious that the current members of
Michigamua were aware of the ongoing violations of their agreement with the University.
Given the ongoing marginalization of the University's students of color, again contrary to remarks made by the University
administration, meaningful discussion must not be devoid of historical context. Certainly, if it was not for the continued
oppressive climate at the University as fostered by Michigamua, discussions regarding the SCC's concerns would not be
necessary. However, as of today, the oppressive history continues to be written and is therefore critical to current discussions.

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