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February 24, 2000 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-24

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HIGHER EDUCATION

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 24, 2000 - 7A

Bonfire inquiry needs more time
More money required to complete investigation

Drumming up support

By Erin Sherbert
Daily Texan (U. Texas at Austin)
USTIN, Texas (U-WIRE) - Investigators of the
1999 Texas A&M Bonfire collapse said Tuesday that
they will need more time and money to complete the
investigation, which was originally scheduled to con-
clude on March 31.
Although investigators didn't specify by how much
they will exceed their $1 million budget, the Bonfire
Commission plans to ask the university for the funds
next Tuesday.
Jon Zagrodzky, a consultant with McKinsey & Co.,
a management and consulting firm providing the com-
et sion with pro bono assistance, said because the
nare of the investigation and research is so complex,
future work is difficult to plan, and findings may
extend schedules and budgets.
He added that a few uncertainties, such as the num-
ber of interviews required, are preventing investigators
from knowing how much money is needed to finish the
job.
"Basically, anytime you find that there is a lead, you

have to follow up - at this time we can't be precise
about how many of those we are going to end up
doing," Zagrodzky said. "Every time you add another
interview, it not only adds time to the budget but cost
as well:"
Leo Linbeck, chair for the commission, said
although he's anxious to complete the work, extending
the investigation deadline is necessary in order to effi-
ciently make a final conclusion.
"I suspect we could jump to conclusions today and
not be certain about the validity of those conclusions
and satisfy the people who desire a quick answer' he
said. "But the larger issue is how can we be thorough
enough in order to assure that the outcome is one
based on fact and truth rather than speculation and
hypothesis."
Also at the meeting Tuesday, the investigating firms
presented their findings thus far and their future plans.
Kent Lietzau, chief of staff for McKinsey & Co.,
said the teams have completed 40 percent of the inves-
tigation and analysis stage, adding that the next step is
to begin team reports and develop possible hypotheses
for the collapse that killed 12 and injured 27 in

November.
"A hypothesis development is in the near future -
taking the pieces to the puzzle they have collected and
begin exploring various options, various sequences and
various possibilities that may have occurred," Lietzau
said
He added that the commission will not start a final
report until the teams meet to discuss their individual
reports.
Fay Engineering, the team investigating the Bon-
fire's historical design, has completed log density tests
and finished analyzing photos of the structure from
1928 to the present.
Lietzau said Fay also conducted a rope experiment,
in which the team selected a portion of a one-inch rope
similar to those used in the Bonfire, kept it in tension,
then twisted and tightened the rope as it normally
would be in building the Bonfire.
"As you tighten the rope, you pull up some slack,
but at the same time you will stretch the rope, and the
top of the structure will be pulled toward that location
as well - which means other ropes will be tightened
and stretched," Lietzau said.

_

,"
Anx
..

Wisconsin students criticize police

Madison-area police
arrested anti-sweatshop
activists Sunday
By Andrew Krueger
The Daily Cardinal (U. Wisconsin)
ADISON, Wis. (U-WIRE) - In
the wake of Sunday's mass arrest of
anti-sweatshop sit-in participants in
University of Wisconsin's Bascom
Hall, arrested students criticized the
actions of law enforcement officers
at the scene and in the Dane County
Jail.
Wisconsin sophomore David
Ernesto Alvarado, one among the 54
s ents arrested, said the police
re onse was unnecessarily intimi-
dating.
"They knew we were peaceful,"

Alvarado said. "For them to come in
full riot gear ... it was very intimidat-
ing. I remember thinking, 'they can't
be serious."'
Alvarado said the sometimes-light
atmosphere during the arrests
masked fear.
"Just because we were laughing
doesn't mean we were having fun,"
Alvarado said. "We were afraid. Our
only response was to laugh."
Several protesters complained
about the use of pressure point holds
and rough treatment while being car-
ried out of the building.
"It seemed to be very gratuitous,"
said Wisconsin graduate student
John Peck, who was not arrested but
compiled a list of complaints against
the police. "A lot of people felt they
were like guinea pigs for the police
to practice on."

.

Junior Ben Runkle, one of seven
protesters in self-applied U-locks
intended to prevent removal from the
premises, said police applied force to
his throat and chin to get him to spit
out the key even after he had given
in.
"It was quite a few seconds of me
saying 'take it, take it' (before they
did)," he said.
University police were unavailable
for comment Tuesday. But, Letters
and Science Dean Phillip Certain,
who observed the arrests, discussed
what he saw.
"The police were concerned that
the students were prepared to attack
them," he said. "They had heard the
students were collecting vinegar and
fire extinguishers."
Certain also said pressure points
were used in some cases, but.-said it

is standard procedure.
Allegations of misconduct also
arose from the time demonstrators
spent in jail.
Alvarado said his brother, also
arrested, required medication. He
said medication was brought to the
jail, but not given to his brother until
he left the jail at 2 p.m. Sunday.
Dane County Sheriff Gary Ham-
blin said it is standard procedure to
hold back and verify delivered med-
ication, since it could possibly differ
from the label on the bottle.
Hamblin said medication given to
prisoners usually comes from jail
supplies.
Some protesters reported trouble
with the jail phones, including
inability to access certain numbers.
Hamblin said no such blocking
existed Sunday.

KI"TSUOG"'HI/Dily
Jvalamukhi Dasi, Purushasukta Das and Amalaharinam Das, members of
the Bhakti Yoga Club, perform a dance ritual on the Diag yesterday.
Study shows half
of students cheat

i

By Lauren Wiener
Daily Northwestern (Northwestern U.)
EVANSTON, III. (U-WIRE) - In
the arena of academic dishonesty,
colleges and universities nationwide
are facing a discrepancy between
policy and practice.
Half of all college students admit
to having cheated at least once dur-
ing their undergraduate careers,
according to a recent survey con-
ducted by Ball State University in
Muncie, Ind. At Ball State and at
other schools, cheating occurs
despite outlined academic integrity
policies.
To address the issue, Pennsylvania
State University is designing a new
academic integrity policy.
"We had a long-standing policy

that was very elaborate," said John
Cahir, vice provost and dean for
undergraduate education at Penn
State. "We became dissatisfied with
it because we detected widespread
sentiment that it was too complex
and bureaucratic."
The new policy will allow the fac-
ulty to make the final determinations
regarding consequences of cheating.
"By having the primary agents as
professors, it becomes a
teaching/learning situation," Cahir
said. "It becomes a more positive
experience for the student, one they
can learn from."
Although professors and teacher's
assistants may monitor exams, their
job becomes difficult when hundreds
of students take a test together, stu-
dents and administrators said.

COUNSELORS. Water-fron t Director
vWSI). Lifeguards. Art Instructor. needed loi
Jewish Coummunii xCenter s Raanana Day
Camp. June 26-Aucusi 18. Call Craig Pollack
tr further into at 971-0990.
CUSTOMER SERVICE/RETAIL SALES
50-year-old company
200X EXPANSION
P/T. F/T. No exp. - We train.
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Scholarships - conditions exist
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Guaranteed Pay
971-6122 M-W 2-7.
FEM. MODELS FOR nude photography,
Top daily rates for elite models. Prof.
supportive atmosphere Must be 18, No exp
rce Call Karen at 213-6710
FIFTY $ PLUS GAS expenses. Arc you
driving to the NYC metro area for spring
break' Will pay you to bring a 27 inch TV
from A2 area. Please call 973 420-9621 for
details
FOREIGN LANGUAGE instructors and
tra ttors needed. Call 662-0434.
Fk RNITIES * Sororities * clubs
Student Groups- Student organizations earn
S 1.000- S2.000 with the easy
campusfundraiser com three-hour fundraising
event. No sales required. Fundraising dates
are filling quickly, so call today' Contact
campusfundraiser.com (888)932-3238, or
visit www.campnusfundraiser.comn
FT & PT POSITIONS available @ the Ann
Arbor YMCA. Dependable. outgoing. self-
starters needed for customer service position
in an organization with established career
dex >ment and training programs. Call Jon
' -0536 ext 234 or fill out an application
350 S.Fifth Ave.. Ann Arbor FOE.
HAVE AN AMAZING SUMMER
ADVENTURE: Prestigious coed camp in
beautiful Massachusetts seeks carmy.
motivated college students & grads who love
kids! GENERAL & SPECIALITY (Athletics.
Tennis. Waterfront. Arts. Crafts, Theatre,
Pioneer. Etc). COUNSELORS needed. Join a
dedicated. fun team. Competitive salaries+
travel+room+board. Call Bob or Barbara at
1-800-762-2820.
IMMEDIATE INCOME Opportunity.
Make money while attending college, serious
mcu s only. 734-913-2184.
.JOIN PEACE ORIENTED Income-sharing
co-op trying to have smart kids. Near Univ.
Illinois. Students Welcome. 1-800-498-7781
www childrenforthefuture.ore
LABORATORY ASSISTAN'T'/Work Study
Student Only. Prepare Solutnons. mntai n
glassware, and assist with protocols in a
dermatology research lab. Prefer student with
science background or seeking
science/medical degree. Joyce Roth 763-
0355.
LI UARD Ann Arbor YMCA is looking
for' certified lifeguards. Flexible hours.
excellent training opportunities. YMCA
membership. & bus pass included. Call Mary
() 663-0536 ext 225 or fill out application 6
350 S. Fifth Ave. EOE.
LOCAL MORTGAGE company seeks
telemarketers for loan origination. $8-10/hr.
to Strtt Cal Craio (> 8-547-0757.

MUSIC LOVER- Concert promoter has SWIMMING POOL service and MSU VS. U OF M HOCKEY tickets for
openings for flyeriug staff. M-F approx. construction. Top pay for hard working, self sale 12!25/00 game) Call 517 351-1992.
1 lain- 2pm. Hourly wage + concert tickets. motivated people to work in the NW
665-4755. DETROIT SUBS. Must be trustworthy and MYRTLEBEA.H, SC- SPRING BREAK-
deoe.ndable. 248-4777727 GRAD WEEK. X75 & t'P PER PERSON.

MUSIKER TOURS AND SUMMER
DISCOVERY
SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES
Counselors needed for our student travel
programs And/or our pre-college enrichment
programs. Applicants must be 21 years old
by June 20. 2000.
We need:
*Mature
*Hardworking
*Energetic individuals who can dedicate 4-7
weeks this summer working with teenagers.
To receive an application or to find out more
information: Call (888)8SUMMER or
E-mail: wil summerfun.com to set up an
interview on Februlary 10. 2(8)0
OWN A COMPUTER? Put it to work! S25-
S75/hr PT/FT. www.home-at-last.net
1-888- 788-1033.
PART TIME CLERICAL. Must have
computer skills. MS Word, Excel. Up to
S 10/hr. Flex. sched. free prkg.
Stadiumn/Patiline area. 662-46t)
PART TIME TEMP.
20 brsiwk.. 58.00/hour
For Stockkeeping and/or
Cashier's work at UM
Wareh use. Call Jim
0. 76-1-2,470 between
12 Noon & 4:00 p.m.
PART TIME- office and light domestic
work. Mailings, computer entry, photo album
assembly. I mile south of I-94. 662-4404.
POSTAL JOBS to S18.35/hr. Inc. Benefits,
no experience. For application and exam
info.. call I 800-813-3585, ext. 3808, 8 am-9
pm. 7 days fds, inc.
SECURITY GUARDS FOR U of M
campus. No car req. Flex. schedule. On the
job paid training. Apply @ State Security
Services, 525 Church St., 668-0444. EOE.
SEEKING PEOPLE who have a passion for
does and their owners. P/T. h)pto S15/hi-.
aier unpaid ti amine. (888) 380-8282.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS
NEEDED FOR PREMIER CAMPS
IN MASSACHUSETTS
Position available for students as counselors
in all eamn sports. all individual sports such
as Tennais & Gof.: Waterfront and Pool
activities, and specialty activities including
art. dance. theatre. gymnastics, newspaper,
rocketry & radio GREAT SALARIES,
room. board and travel. June 17th-August
16th. MAH-KEE-NAC
www.campnmkn.com (Boys): 1-800-753-
9118 DANBEE www.danbee.com
(Girls) 1-800-392-3752.

V.',.'. '.X IcII pliI) IIIC{I r rIrL- ri.

UNIVERSITY TOWERS is a 240 unit
student housing property, .looking for a
sales/leasing person to help in our Ieasime
department. Must be people oriented andi
dependable. Afternoons and Weekends ai
Must. Responsibilities include leasing and
general office work. 56.50 per hour plus
commission. Also offeriig medical. dental
benefits & 401k plan. Send or fax resume o
University To~ ers
Leasing [Director
536 S.Forest Ave
Ann Arbor. M 48104
Fax 734-761-2027
WANTED! 50 SERIOUS PEOPLE to lose
weight for spring. Natural, guaranteed. I-
888-524-7271 www.123goslim.com
WANTED: HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS
Healthy men and women ages 18-65 who are
non-smoking and not taking any medications
are needed to participate in a study
examining the effect of commonly used
medications on enzymes found in the liver
and intestine. The study requires a physical
exam and a 14 day stay in the General
Clinical Research Center at the University of
Michigan Hospital. Participants will take one
of 4 study drugs or no drug, have blood
drawn and undergo medical procedures.
Compensat ion is S$1475.00. For more
nformat ion call Tele Care at (734) 763 -90H
and enter code 2205. Please leave your name.
phone number.
WATERFRONT STAFF NEEDED foo
summer day camp. Lifeguards- S/hr
Waterfront Director (WSI) - 51? 50/hr. work
3.5-4 hours per day. Monday - Friday. June
26 to August 18. Call 971 -0900 for more
information.
WEBSITE DEVELOPERS. Golden
opportunity to assist in developing a sports-
related website. If you are creative.
enthusiastic, knowledgeable, motivated.
please call 662-4600.
WILDLIFE JOBS to 521 60/hr. Inc.
benefits. Game wardens, securtv.
maintenance, park rangers, no exp. needed.
For applic. and exam info, call I 800-811-
3585, ext. 3809, 8am-9pm, 7 days fds. inc.

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MICHIGAMUA
Continued from Page 1A
Reilly said the SCC opposes the plan
for a panel. "Our condition is it would
be best to keep it open for everybody at
all times," Reilly said, referring to the
group's position that the space be turned
into a cultural lounge.
"They've misconstrued our reason
for being here," Reilly said. "They've
turned it into a question of office space
when it is a question of equal treat-
ment."
Delgado said tomorrow is the last
day Michigamua will sign an agree-
ment "until at the very least the middle
of next week."
Members of the senior honor soci-
ety Phoenix, which has meeting space
on the sixth floor of the Union, deliv-
ered a proposal to all parties involved
in the Union takeover yesterday. The
proposal calls for SCC to vacate the
tower immediately and for Phoenix to

regain access to its meeting room
while a dialogue takes place to "create
an appropriate contract and evaluation
system to examine allocated space to
all student organizations."
Phoenix members said they are
open to whatever decision the Univer-
sity makes regarding space allocation
but feel only the administration should
exercise jurisdiction over the issue.
"The key is that it's the administra-
tion's decision -- no one else should
make a decision but them," said
Phoenix member Jon Malkovich, an
Engineering senior.
Phoenix members said they believe
SCC's petition, delivered to University
officials Feb. 4, is a representation of
the importance of student concerns,
even if it may threaten their privileges.
"It's important to examine issues
that are important to students on cam-
pus," said Tracey Parker, a Phoenix
member. "But like we said before,
we're leaving no stone unturned."

Due to SPRING BREAK
CLASSIFIEDS DISPLAY ADS
will have
EARLY DEADLINE of
Wednesday, February 23
for the March 6. 7. & 8 publications.
Call 764-0557 or stop by Student Publication
Building to place your Classifieds ad!
LESSONS: Guitar. Bass. Banto. Piano. H.
lDUlcim1er, Sitar. Balalaika io. Brass. Fiddle,
Pere., etc. Herb David Guitar Studio 302 E.
Liberty 665-8001.

GRAMMYS
Continued from Page 1A
over Martin, Marc Antony, Lou Bega
and Andrea Bocelli to win the award
for "Brand New Day," the title track
from his newest album, which was
also awarded the Grammy for Best
Pop Album.
Elton John was presented with the
Lifetime Achievement Award and
introduced by friend Billy Joel. Elton's
career spans several generations and
genres, as he has received both Gram-
my and Oscar awards.
Beating out Lauryn Hill, Macy
Grey, Brandy and Mary J. Blige, Whit-
ney Houston walked away with Best
Female R&B Vocal with the song "It's
Not Right But It's Okay." The veteran
diva's performance, which was one of
the night's highlights, featured some
impressive choreography by the dozen
or so dancers accompanying her on
stage.
Will Smith opened the telecast with
an energetic, albeit poor, performance.
Following was the night's host Rosie
O'Donnell, whose opening monologue
proved that this talk show host has
become a little rusty at stand-up come-
dv. The monoloQue's few highlights

mances appeared unenthusiastic and
lacked the energy that the evening's
award show desperately needed. Even
Kid Rock's set, a medley of "Only
God Knows Why," "Bawitdaba" and
Grand Funk Railroad's "American
Band," fell short despite ample energy,
perhaps due to the short time length
allotted to his performance.
Awards not presented during the
three-hour telecast, comprising 88 of
the 98 total Grammys, were handed
out to older acts as well. The award for
Best Female Rock Vocal was given to
Sheryl Crow for her cover of Guns 'N'
Roses' "Sweet Child O' Mine." Best
Hard Rock Performance went to vets
Metallica, with "Whiskey in the Jar."
Lenny Kravitz took home the Best
Male Rock Vocal for "American
Woman" and, rounding out the rock
categories, Beck won for Best Alterna-
tive Music Performance with his
album "Mutations," while the Red Hot
Chili Peppers won Best Rock Song for
their hit, "Scar Tissue."
The only categories to pay respect
to new artists were those in the rap
genre and, of course, Best New Artist
to teen "genie" Christina Aguilera.
Honoring Eminem with Best Rap
Album, the newcomer also won for

child care f;

persoa

GREAT SUMMER
COUNSELOR POSITIONS
HAVE FUN * WORK WITH KIDS
* MAKE A DIFFERENCE*
SUMMER IN NEW ENGLAND
Residential summer camps seek
motivated staff in individual and
team sports: Baseball, Basketball
Tennis, Soccer Inline Hockey, Gold,
Swimming, Sailing, Mountainbiking,
Backpacking, Hiking, Canoeing,
cpnrnn Rnnanje Cruen Art/

BABYSITTER needed P/T for 5 yr. old and
18 mo. old. Call Kahita or Leland 741-7223.
BABYSITTER. Seeking warm, responsible
babysitter for six mo. old daughter. Tues.
Thur 9-1. 665-3290.

ATTRACTIVE. party-loving. 20-something
already dating energetic movie buff. How'd
they meet? Turns out she's his friends cousin
Sixdcerees showed them the connections
www.sixdeerees.com
SPECIAL GIFT- We're looking for healthy
women between the apes 21-35 for ege

Ic

i

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