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February 17, 2000 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I7-member committee to
select new athletic director

LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 17, 2000 - 5A

SEARCH
Continued from Page 1A
In addition to missing the Michigan
State game, Crawford was suspended
$five games by the NCAA for vio-
lating an amateurism bylaw.
Goss plans to step down Feb. 29
after overseeing one of the most suc-
cessful years in Michigan's athletic
history, including the expansion of
Michigan Stadium and two national
titles. Goss was also the University's
first black athletic director.
Guevara said she was pleased with
Goss's tenure but has high hopes for
the future.
look at where our program has
come in three and a half years. I look
at where some of the women's pro-
grams have come and where they've
been and where they've been able to
stay," she said.
"I know there are some programs
that maybe might need a few more
resources. Maybe somebody who
comes in here will realize that and
W us, whether it's fundraising or
wtever we need to do," she said.

Athletic Director
search committee
Chairman: James Jackson, psychology and Public
Health professor
Paula Allen-Meares, School of Social Work dean
Lloyd Carr, head football coach
Philip Hanlon, mathenatics professor
Denise flitch, president of Olympia Development Inc.
Ethan Johnson. LSA senior
Richard Katcher, Athletic Department Advisory
Board member
Mark Lambert, coordinator of aquatic events
John Matlock, assistant provost and director of the
Office of Academic and Multicultural Initiatives
Marcia Pankratz, women's field hockey coach
Marissa Pollick, M-Club president
Ashley Reichenbach, LSA senior
Suellyn Scarnecchia, Law School associate dean for
clinical affairs
Timothy Slottow, associate vice president for finance
James Stapleton.B&R Consultants president and
CEO
Beverly Ulrich, Division of Kinesiology director
B. Joseph White, Business School dean

SOLE
Continued from Page 1A
Rights Consortium, a student-developed
policy to enforce collegiate labor codes.
After SOLE members had established
their position in the office, LSA senior
Andrew Cornell read a statement that
stressed the group s policy of nonviolence
and its commitment to workers' rights.
SOLE members constructed in the
dean's office a "symbolic sweatshop to
bring the issue of workers' rights closer to
home;" Cornell said. The students offered
Neuman and her assistants the opportunity
to "work" in the sweatshop - complete
with textile factory sound effects -- but
were turned down.
Neuman's assistants were visibly dis-
turbed at the students' demonstration. "It
was kind of like a sneak attack," said
Sandy Petee, assistant to the dean. "I
asked what's happening and someone said,
it's a takeover.'"
Bollinger met with the students shortly
after the takeover, but SOLE members said
they were disappointed with the, outcome
of the meeting.
"He said he needed more time to study
other options. This is unacceptable to us.
We've given U of M five months. It
doesn't take five months to read IlI
pages," SOLE member Rachel Edelman
said.
University spokesman Joel Seguine said,
"Bollinger is keeping the WRC as one

We hope this is resolved quickly, but we are
prepared to stay."
L- Andrew Cornell
LSA senior

option. He is continuing to study it. The
University is continuing to talk with other
universities with similar situations. The
WRC has not been dismissed. Bollinger is,
for now, reserving the right to weigh other
options."
SOLE members spoke to Bollinger sev-
eral times throughout the day but said the
negotiations did not seem to make any
progress.
SOLE members said they are ready to
stay in the dean's office indefinitely until
their demands are met.
"We hope this is resolved quickly, but
we are prepared to stay," Cornell said.
When asked if he was worried about miss-
ing classes, Cornell said, "I was worried,
but I decided this is what it is more impor-
tant. A year from now, I'll be glad I made
this decision."
Meanwhile, students in Madison have
successfully taken over the chancellor's
office after encountering some resistance
from campus security, including the use of
pepper spray on some of the protesters,
students said.
Students entered the building yesterday

afternoon and seven of the protesters were
locked inside of the chancellor's office.
About 75 supporters followed and waited
outside the office.
The students trapped inside the office
were worried that they would be forcibly
removed and chained themselves together.
"We took those black U-Locks (bike
locks) and put them around our necks, r
then chained ourselves together in threes*"
Wisconsin student Brendon O'Sullivan
said.
After several hours, Ward announced
Wisconsin would be dropping out of the-
Fair Labor Association - a White House-i
sponsored coalition of corporations and
human rights group aimed at curbing labot
abuse in the apparel industry - which the-
protesters oppose.
But Ward also said he would be taking
the weekend to consider the issues put to
him by the protesters, now numbering
about 100 students, and is not planning to
meet with the students until Monday,
protest member Adam Klaus said.
Members of SOLE hope to meet with
Bollinger tomorrow morning.

*'Combine travel and study
* Open Enrollment
* Earn University credit
* Financial aid is available

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