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February 15, 2000 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-15

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 15, 2000 - 11
Gym Dogs still hold mental advantage over Blue

Lions sign back
to five-year deal
PONTIAC (AP) -- The Detroit
Lions took dead ainm on free-agent
running back James Stewart.
Yesterday, they got their man.
Stewart, who led the Jacksonville
Jaguars with 931 yards rushing and
13 touchdowns last season, signed for
$25 million over five years, including
a signing bonus of $5.75 million,
The Lions, who got by with virtu-
ally no running game after the sur-
prise retirement of Barry Sanders on
the eve of training camp last season,
outbid the Cleveland Browns for
Stewart.
"A lot of it came down to how I felt
after my visit here last Friday,"
Stewart said at a news conference in
the Silverdome.
- "The staff, the coaches, everybody
really made me feel welcome"
Stewart said he also was influenced
by the fact that Detroit seems closer
to winning a championship than the
Browns do.
"This is like a puzzle here,"Stewart
said. "I fit into this puzzle real well. I
think in Cleveland I'd have to carry
the load. Here, I'll just be a piece."
Hasek to return
for one more year
BUFFALO, N.Y.(AP) - Dominik
Hasek wants a different kind of
farewell, and intends to do something
about it: The star goaltender of the
Buffalo Sabres will play another sea-
son. .
Hasek, one of the great goalies in
NHL history, missed three months
this season because of a groin injury.
He had planned to retire after this sea-
son but has reconsidered.
"What changed my mind, very sim-
ply, was the injury," he said during a
news conference yesterday.
Hasek announced in July that this
season would be his last. He said at
the time that the longer he stayed in
the United States, the harder his son
Michael's adjustment would be to life
in the Czech Republic, where Hasek
wants to return when he retires.
"When I made the announcement I
didn't expect to be out for more than
half of the season," the 35-year-old
goalie said. "I expected to have a full,
good season for the Buffalo Sabres."
The two-time Hart and five-time
Vezina Trophy winner aggravated his
groin injury Oct. 29. He is 2-0-2 since
returning Feb. 1.y

By Richard Haddad
Daily Sports Writer

Friday night, the Michigan
women's gymnastics team had the
chance to make a statement. A sea-
son-high crowd came out to watch
No. 3 Michigan take on No. 2
Georgia and the Wolverines were
hoping to knock off the Gym Dogs
for the first time ever.
Unfortunately for Michigan, the
results were not what it had hoped
for. The Wolverines fell - literally
and figuratively - 195.700-
196.725.
But the subpar performance can-
not be attributed to a lack of ability.
Michigan is just as good a team as
Georgia is. The difference lies in the
mental aspect of the sport - the
magnified intimidation and nervous-
ness' of sharing the mat with the
mighty Gym Dogs toppled the
Wolverines.
"It bothers me to hear Sarah (Cain)
and Karina (Senior) say we prepare
differently for Georgia than we do
for other teams," Michigan coach
Bev Plocki said. "We shouldn't be
preparing differently for anybody.
What we try to do every time out is
continue to be in control of our own
team, and if they were distracted by
Georgia, we were not paying atten-
tion to what we needed to pay atten-
tion to. And look what happened."
What happened was that Michigan
suffered a fall on the uneven bars,
two falls off of the balance beam,
and several stumbles on the floor
exercise. In contrast to the
Wolverines' recent performances, the
lapses represent a significant depar-
ture.

"When you have a string of
meets,like we've had, without count-
ing falls, I don't want to say it's
bound to happen, but you always
wonder how long that string can con-
tinue and when it will be broken,"
Plocki said. "It's just unfortunate that
it was broken here, in this arena."
Michigan's faults can be attributed
more to mental lapses than to physi-
cal inadequacies.
"When you're nervous, beam is the
event that you take the hit on," Plocki
said. "The thing I was most disap-
pointed in is that we had falls on the
floor; those are extremely uncharac-
teristic of this team.
"Our kids are human, and every
once in a while they're going to have
a fall, but we need to be able to
bounce back from that - to not
allow one problem to turn into a lot
of problems."
Failures on the beam have been a
common factor in Michigan's last
two regular season meets against
Georgia. This was just the most
recent episode in a series. A season-
low 48.075 on the final rotation of
the Super Six Challenge earlier this
year cost the Wolverines a victory
over the Gym Dogs. Last season in
Ann Arbor, three falls led to
Michigan's 47.725 on the event and
another Georgia win.
Georgia coach Suzanne Yoculan
went as far as attributing the Gym
Dogs' historical dominance over the
Wolverines to the same mental laps-
es.
"Many times, Michigan has had
teams on the floor that had the abili-
ty to beat Georgia," Yoculan said.
"Part of it is not necessarily a deficit
that Michigan has, but an advantage

that the Georgia team has, in terms
of our tradition and our legacy. We
know how to win."
That tradition and legacy mani-
fests itself in the form of the- etn
tiousness conveyed by the Ge ra
squad.
Each gymnast walked in synchro-
nization from event to event, i g-
ing their arms and tiptoe1in in
rhythm with each other.
GymDog star Kristi Lichys floor
exercise epitomized cool arrogarfce
Instead of beaming and playing to
the judges likermost gymnasts, Lichy
wore sly, subtle grins throughgu
Calm and relaxed, barely fired up
and refusing to beam or overly play
to the judges like most gymnasts do,
Lichy scored a 9.875.
Yoculan's comments verbalized
more of that cool arrogance.
"We've beaten Michigan every
time we've competed against them,
haven't we?" Yoculan asked.. "'The
time they were second in the fouttrv,
we were first. And when they were
fourth we were third. They roll over
to us a little bit, and the dayv will
come when they stop doing -that
because they're a good enough
team."
While Michigan's gymnasts adit-
ted to feeling a bit more nervous in
the face of a perennial power,
Georgia was lacking any similar sen-
timents.
"Georgia's not intimidated . by
many teams. I've never known them
to be intimidated at all," Yociilan
said. "The Georgia team has t istf
heart, a lot of desire to win.".
And when it comes down toitin
close competition, Georgia's going to
win, and that's the bottom linL'

JAM Hll N-,lUC1a)
The No. 3 Michigan women's gymnastics team fell to No. 2 Georgia this weekend at
home. The win for the Gymdogs was their third in the past two seasons over Michigan.

Boston U. bans popular cheer

(MCHIGAN MONDAYS

By Erik Malinowski
Daily Free Press (Boston U.)

(U-WIRE) - When the Boston
University Terriers took the ice last night
to challenge Boston College in the
Beanpot Tournament championship, stu-
dents missed what has come to be a stan-
dard line of defense against the Eagles.
In conjunction with the Boston
University Athletics Department, BU
Band Director Joe Wright has nixed one
of the more popular cheers from any
future Terrier hockey games, due to
crowd profanity and inappropriate
behavior.
"It's a tune called "Eat 'Em Up,"
Wright said. "It was here when I got to
BU eight years ago. It was around, but it
wasn't the power-play tune. We didn't
even have one. Then about four years

ago, we decided on that one. All kinds of
college bands play it"
For the last four years, every time an
opposing player has been sent to the
penalty box, Wright would strike up the
band for "Eat 'Em Up." Recently, Terrier
fans started ending the cheer with the
words, "F*** 'em up, f*** 'em up, BC
sucks."
After recent complaints from some
BU alumni, Wright and members of the
Athletic Department decided to look
into the issue.
"I've had conversations with people in
the Athletic Department," Wright said.
"There have been alumni who have been
upset at the kind of stuff that's been
going on. I don't know if they have any
way of solving it. But they've wanted to
know if there's anything we do to
encourage it."
"I've talked to him about this situa-

tion," said Gary Strickler, BU's Director
of Athletics. "We've had complaints
before [in past years], but we've had
more than usual this season. I can't be
sure that they were all alumni, though:'
College of Arts and Sciences junior
Rebecca Sansom, who plays trumpet in
the band, understands and agrees with
Wright's decision. Because of the band's
role as a representative of BU, she feels
the song should be scrapped.
"Part of our purpose is to promote
good sportsmanship at BU,' Sansom
said. "We understand it's better for us not
to play the song. We're all good-natured
people, and we never participate in the
cheers. People do understand that our
role is to be a representation of Boston
University."
Still, fans showed their disapproval
last Friday as BU took on the University
of Massachusetts at Lowell.

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Universit y of Michigan
Career Planning & Placement
_ - Fair

REC
SPORTS
INTRAMUJRALS

The University of Michigan
Department of Recreational Sports
INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM

WHAT'S

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February 15, 2000
3:00pm - 7:00pm
Michigan Union

PRE-SEASON
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Explore Internet/New Media Careers
advertising
marketing

NIKE

ENTRIES TAKEN:
Mon 2/14 to Weds 2/16
11:00 AM to 4:30 PM
ENTRY FEE:
$35 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Thurs 2/17, 6:00 PM, IMSB
TOURNAMENT DATES:
Sat & Sun 2/19 & 2/20, IMSB

RELAYS MEET
ENTRIES DUE:
Tues 2/22, 4:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$25 per team
MEET DATE:
Weds 2/23
U of M Track Building
EVENTS:
800m (each runs l lap)
1200m (2 = 1 lap; 2 = 2 laps)
1 600m(each runs 2 laps)
3200m (4 = 2 labs; 2 = 4 laps)

NIKE

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NIKE

ENTRIES TAKEN:
Monday 2/21 ONLY
11:00 AM to 5:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$72 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Weds 2/23, 7:15 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Tuesday 3/7
Sports Coliseum

MINI-SOCCER

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ENTRIES TAKEN:
Monday 2/21 ONLY
11:00 AM to 5:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$55per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Weds 2/23, 6:00 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Monday 3/6
Yost Ice Arena

Recruiters will be targeting all majors
Plan to attend the pre-fair program

NIKE

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