100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 14, 2000 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - February 14, 2000

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY
Edited by Michael Kern and Ryan C. Moloney
Water poio 'best in midwest'
Weekend a clean sweep for undefeated women's team

Ire [trhU9un g

6

Michigan schedule Men's college basketball

L

The Michigan women's water polo
club is off to a great start. After nine
games this season. it s 9-0. This
includes a recent tournament win
this past weekend.
Coach Scott Russel. who has
coached the women's water polo
team for the past 13 seasons, attrib-
utes its past and present winning
streak to two different factors.
"Our team early has had a !ot of
success and we expect to be success-
ful again this year," Russell said.
,Part of this is recruiting .-- we
recruit terrific athletes who have an
opportunity to play at a number of
schools, but because this is the
University of Michigan they choose
to come here and that's a big advan..
age for us"
Past seasons of the women's club
water polo team have resulted in
some big wins. They have won 1i
,onsecutive Big Ten championships
and are considered "best in the
lidwest," compared with other clut
and varsity level teams.
"The other big aspect is that all of'
our athletes train year-round,"
Russell said. "This is not a part-time
sport for them, they don't just drop
in and play for a couple of months,
then go away for the rest of the year.

All of our top athletes are dedicated
to their sport - they train at the
same level as all of the varsity ath-
letes in the country, and they play 12
months out of the year."
The women's water polo club
enjoyed a clean sweep against two of
the four teams they faced this past
weekend. On Friday, the club pound-
ed Ohio State, 23-0.
Saturday, the club blasted Emory,
16-0. It also competed Saturday
against Miami, OH and won 14-5.
The meet on Sunday against
Michigan State provided the
Wolverines with stiffer competition,
but they managed to outscore them,
6-1.
Overall, Michigan has outscored
its opponents 115-12, during its nine
games played this season. As of now,
it is ranked 15th nationally, the high-
est ranked club team in the country.
The club relies on its speed to
challenge and outscore its oppo-
nents. "If we were a B-Ball team, we
would be the type of team running up
and down the court - a breakaway
team," Russell said. "We use a lot of
breakaways to try and push the
tempo, and make the other team
chase us."
--Rhonda Gilmer

Wednesday February 16
Men's Basketball at Wisconsin, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday February 17
Women's Swimming and Diving at Big Ten
Championships (Indianapolis, Ind.), 11:00 a.m.
Softball vs. Stanford (Poway, Calif.), 5:30 p.m.
Women's Basketball vs. Wisconsin, 7:00 p.m.
Friday February 18
Women's Swimming and Diving at Big Ten
Championships (Indianapolis, Ind.), 11:00 a.m.
Men's Tennis vs. Eastern Michigan, 4:00 p.m.
Softball vs. Cal State-Northridge (Poway,
Calif.), 6:30 p.m.
Ice Hockey at Northern Michigan, 7:05 p.m.
Softball vs. UCLA (Poway, Calif.), 9:00 p.m.
Saturday February,19
Women's Swimming and Diving at Big Ten
Championships (Indianapolis, Ind.), 11:00 a.m.
Men's Basketball vs. Penn State, 12:17 p.m.
Softball vs. Pacific (Poway, Calif.), 1:30 p.m.
Men's Gymnastics at Massachusetts, 7:00 p.m.
Ice Hockey at Northern Michigan, 7:05 p.m.
Women's Gymnastics at Georgia, 7:30 p.m.
Softball vs. Long Beach State (Poway, Calif.),
11:30 p.m.
Men's Track and Field hosts Silverton
Invitational, TBA
Women's Track and Field hosts Silverton
Invitational, TBA
Sunday February 20
Softball vs. Sacramento State (Poway, Calif.),
11:30 a.m.
Women's Tennis vs. Kcnruck}'. 1:00 p~.
Women's Baskethall at Michigan Stare, 5:00
p.mi.
Wrestling arCOhio State, 2:00 p.m.

No. 4 SYRACUSE 71, UCLA 67
No. I CINCINNATI 87, DePaul 64
No. 25 LOUISIANA STATE 70,
No. I1 Kentucky 57
No. 19 TEMPLE 73, No. 23 Maryland 65
SOUTH FLORIDA 87, NC Charlotte 83
Rider 78, CANISIUS 75
ST. JOSEPII'S 93, Fordhamn 86
LOYOLA (MD.) 57, St. Peter's 55
BRise St. 66, NEW MEXICO STATE 65
CREIGHTON 73, Bradley 56
SIENA 91, Marist 81
LOUISVILLE 76, Marquette 64
NIAGRA 77, Fairfield 74 (OT)
Georgetown 72, PITTSBURGH 65
Women's college basketball

Who: Mike Comrie
Hometown: Edmonton, Alberta

Why: Comrie tallied five points this weekend on two goals and three
assists. Comrie's weekend put him second in the nation and first in
the conference in scoring with 46 points. Comrie has already
surpassed his total from last year when he led the team in points.
Background: Last season's CCHA Rookie of the Year ... Led Michigan a
year ago with 43 points ... Named 1997-98 Canadian Junior 'A' Hockey
League Player of the Year. Comrle
'M' gynasts 's wing
into Las Vegas, baby

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Sport: Hockey
Year: Sophomore

NEBRASKA 75, Kansas 72
St Peters 83, SIENA 59
St Louis 61, N.C. CHARLOTTE 54
FAIRFIELD 66, Marist 55
Marquette 60, LOUISVILLE 49
N.C. STATE 67, Clemson 58
OLD DOMINION 91, American 51
NORTI I CAROLINA 85, Georgia Tech 62
Kent 66, NORTHERN ILLINOIS 61
VIRGINIA 57, Arkansas State 55
KENTUCKY 73, Suth Carolina 71
fames Madison 64, NC WILMINGTON 55
OHIO STATE 61, Northwestern 55
RICE 78, Tulsa 50
George Washington 85, St. Bonaventure 44
PENN STATE 78, Purdue 67
IOWA 80, Illinois 73
XAVIER 83, Fordham 50
WISCONSIN 77, Michigan Stare 69
Auburn69,ALABAMA 59

NHL Standings
CENTRAL W L T RT PT HOME
Sr . u' 51Ii 6 C 76 1-1-7 4
I troit 3 2 17 6 I 71 21.6-2
Nj4wilIc 26 3i 6 i 10-14-
ChicaWo 19 2H 7 2 47 9.14-3
NORThiIWEST W L T T 1'T5P HOME

N\BA Standings

Cycling prepares for season

AWAY
11.11A
io- 161i
841}-6
AWVAY
8.16-6
S-'0-

With all of the snow and sludge of
February kicking into high gear, it's
hard to believe anybody thinks about
cycling.
But the members of the Michigan
cycling club aren't just thinking
about it - they're steadfastly prepar-
ing for the opening meet of their
spring road season, Feb. 26 at Miami
of Ohio.
Of course the question, especially
in sub-freezing temperatures, is how?
"We'll ride outside until it's 25
degrees, then we get on the rollers,"
Seth Kleinglass said.
Rollers are devices which keep a
bike in a stationary position for
indoor training.
Otherwise, it's back on the streets
for as many as 20 hours of training
each week.
"Most serious guys go six or
seven days a week - we definitely
train by time," Kleinglass said.
"Usually we go about 18 miles a
day.".

The team consists of an A, B and
C team for men and an A and B team
for women. There is a S55 entry fee
into the club, plus an additional
charge for races, though Kleinglass
describes college races as "real
cheap."
The club is open to all students
and the skill levels range from begin-
ner to semi-professional. While
spring is the road season, the fall
consists of mountain racing.
The club was a national qualifier
last year and returns Mike
Tramontini - a national qualifier
and runner-up in the Big Ten confer-
ence in the mountain season.
"Anybody serious usually starts
before college," Kleinglass said.
"But I started as a freshman and I'm
a starter - it takes a lot of time and
it's expensive.
"It's an individual sport, but you
work together as a team, especially.
with strategies in the road season."
-Rvan C. Molonev

Cln ordo
Elm mtuvcv

2
17

2 1
27

S3
1>
6
10

6.

(,31
f6r
50

1 7 t-1
1-6.9
1i-7-4
9.174

PACIFIC W L T
I'htxnu k, 19 6
NORHIFAST W L TI
Trn3o V 26
2620 9
lIor,li 21 26 S
&ron IS 24 15
19 2s 7
ATLANTIC W L TI
Phitaklphia 28 16 10
\lY,' ,.r. 24 24 ti
itt Nirgh 24 26 5
SOUrMEASr W L TI
Hr l 12 1) 4
Wi.hio-mm 27 IS 9
I. m~mi 21 2i :8
Tio,1a Bay 12 36 6
II IS 6
EInenw,, ' l i FFIt' I

RT M S HOME AWAY
I 67 16-2 141-4
2 67 15.10-I 15.104
7 62 11.12"2 11.17-i
3 W 14103i1142.4
I 5 i 12-12.4 11.14.4
RT Prs HOME AWAY
3 6 19.7-4 11.11:2
2 63 10..5 12-124
3 3i 14.10,i 1.16.3
4 55 9.12.9 9-1 2.6
3 4S 1.13i9.1i-2
RT vrS HOME AWAY
4 S 2142 12d114
1 67 17.6,5 11.10.5
1 39 13-12.3 1.12.3
5 58 17-3-4 7.11.i
RT PYTS HOME AWAY
1 71 2'"5.2 1 214-'
1 fr4 164,b 1-14.3
0 i4 I 1.11-I 1.140
6 36 9.1631 3.20.3
4 12 S.IS,2 3.2 '.4
Ti'dn'. (Ani,:
sI..' t~ j

EASTERN
oirItodo
1New vJcr'cy
\V, ingo
CENTRAL
Chasrlotte
Tmsno
Detroit
Nilhv,,ikce
AtlantA
MIDWEST
h. l ino-o's .
honuson
\ itln~t.
PACIFIC
LA Liuker
l'l,'io ss
G"olden Stm.e

W L PCT GBt
321 667 -
27 20.574 45
26 21 .553 5.5
25 23,.521 7
20 24 .326 7
1128.404 12.5
10 37.213 21.5
W L PCT GB
32' 17 .631--
29 18,617 2
27 20 .574 4
21 27.438 10.51
20 28 A17 11.3
20 30 ,401) 12.5
14 14 .292 17.5

HOME AWAY
20.3 7-17
16.8 10,11
17-7 8.16
14.1.' 12,14
14.10 5.18
13i9 4.21
6-16. 421

W L PCT
'18 i.617
27 22 1s
29 I S.01
19 340.3"S

GB HOME AWAY
-- 17-6 l1i-11
1 15.5 1l-13
4 17-S 10.14
10 17r9 4-19
12 1i-11 4-19
16 10-14 5.20

STK
Won I
L 4
L,'t 3
Lost 1
STK
Won 2
Won 3
Won 3
Lost 3
Wort 1
L.'~t 4
Ltd

By Rohit Bhave
Daily Sports Writer
Like Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau
in "Swingers," junior co-captain Justin
Toman led five other Michigan men's
gymnasts to "Vegas, baby," for the sec-
ond annual Winter Cup Challenge in
Las Vegas, Nevada.
Eighty-eight elite gymnasts from
club and collegiate teams around the
nation competed Friday and Saturday.
The meet's top three finishers quali-
fied for the U.S. National Team and a
chance to represent the United States in
the Visa/America Cup, the nation's
most prestigious international meet.
Toman finished tenth in the all-
around finals, although he was ranked
as high as fourth before a debilitating
8.0 performance on high bar.
Toman and freshman Kris
Zimmerman both qualified for the all-
around finals with respective prelimi-
nary finishes of fifth and 25th, needing
to place in the top 36.
Toman captured the parallel bar
event individual title with an excellent
9.8 routine, and finished fifth on the
floor exercise with a 9.1 score.
Sophomore Scott Vetere finished
fourth on the rings with a 9.2, and he
tied for fifth on the parallel bars with a
9.3.
Junior co-captain Kevin Roulston
completed an all-around set in the
meet, with his best event performance
on the vault, a 15th place finish. Kenny
Keener and Tim Dchr competed as spe-
cialists, respectively finishing 24th in
the rings and 16th the pommel horse.
Perhaps as a testament to their depth,
the top-ranked Wolverines brought six
gymnasts, the largest contingent of per-
formers at Winter Cup.
Michigan's depth has proved to be a
noticeable advantage in its other meets.
this season, especially in their tri-meet
against Minnesota and then-No. 2 Penn
State.
They blew out both opponents and
posted the NCAA's highest score, a
230.55, despite only winning one indi-
vidual event.

Like the previous weekend's hig1
profile showdown's against Penn State
and Ohio State, the Winter Cup mental-
ly hardened the participating gymnasts.
Michigan coach Kurt Golder has
emphasized the championship meets
and the U. S. National Team qualifica-
tion process this season by scheduling
their normal workouts every Friday,
instead of walking through a light
stretch. .
Although his squad may be slightly
fatigued from training on the day of the
meet, Golder maintains that this sea-
son's strategy has longer-term benefits.
"Training hard on Fridays provides
us the benefit of 10 extra practices, giv-
ing us an advantage by the end of the
year for the Big Ten Championships,
NCAA championships, and the (post-
season National team qualification
process),"Golder said.
While their teammates frequentW
Sin City, the rest of the team trained at
home and finally received a break from
the rigors of dual-meet competition.
Injured sophomore Daniel Diaz-
Luong, although invited to Las Vegas,
sat out and used the weekend to heal his
injury.
Diaz-Luong nearly competed last
weekend against Penn State and Ohio
State, but was unable to fulfill Gold*
requirements in practice the preceding
week.
The sophomore received all-
America citations on the vault and the
high bar last year, and should boost the
Wolverines tremendously on both
events upon his return.
The Wolverines travel to
Massachusetts to face the Minutemen
next weekend. Michigan expects to
give work to some inexperienced gy -
nasts in the meets before the Big
Championships.
Once the championship meets begin,
No. 1 Michigan will make another run
at their second consecutive NCAA
National Championship.
If Golder's squad accomplishes their
lofty goals, the Michigan men's gym-
nastics team will be, in the immortal
words of Vaughn, "so money, baby."

HOME AWAY STK
20.4 12.113 Wo2
18-7 19.12 Won 2
15S 1212 Lot2
18.10 5.17 Lust5
11.12 9.16 L I
7418 7,16 Won I

W L PCT GB HOME AWAY
3- 1 .776 - - I 3 20-
3711 .771 .5 23-4 14-7
30' k'2 7.3 i 1 1.13
312 .668 8 15.8 16.12
2'?1 ) o,'4 8.3 21.3 S-14
125 ,2 3 6 7-17 5.18
11ii .'24 27 S.16 3.22

ST K
Won 4
Won .3
WX,, I
Won I
Losxt 3

1wt.wt' Rv ~s6

Tr AV1..W,

Cowboys coaching legend dies at age 75

Tennis wins in Seattle

DALLAS(AP)-Tom Landry, the
Dallas Cowboys coach who led
America's Team to five Super Bowls
and paced the sidelines for three
decades wearing a stone face, busi-
ness suit and his famous fedora, tied
Saturday. He was 75.
Landry had been undergoing
treatment since May for acute mycl-
ogenous leukemia.
Baylor University Medical Center
called in Landry's family earlier in
the day. At 7:45 p.m. CST, the hospi-
tal issued a release in behalf of
Landry's family:
"Coach Tom Landry passed away
today .. at 6 p.m. He went peaceful-

ly surrounded by his loving family.
He will also be missed by his many
friends and fans, and he will never be
forgotten by all of us whose lives he
has touched so deeply."
Landry, who - coached the
Cowboys for their first 29 years, won
two Super Bowls with star quarter-
back Roger Staubach. His 270 victo-
ries are more than any NFL coach
except Don Shula and George Halas.
"Tom Landry's familiar presence
on the Dallas Cowboys' sideline for
three decades represented the NFL at
its best," NFL commissioner Paul
Tagliabue said in a statement. "He
will always rank as one of the all-

time great coaches and as an archi-
tect of one of the most successful
teams in sports history. He will be
remembered for many special rea-
sons, including his record as a coach,
the innovations he brought to our
game, and the personal integrity he
displayed."
Landry considered those innova-
tions his greatest contribution to the
game. His legacy continued through
the coaches he produced, including
Atlanta's Dan Reeves and former
New Orleans coach Mike Ditka, who
both went to the Super Bowl.
"He shaped my philosophy on
everything," Reeves said Saturday

night. "I followed his philosophy on
football and how he handled himself
on and off the field. He was a
tremendous influence on me.
"He was something unique to the
NFL. He was someone who had
tremendous knowledge of the NFL,
but he was also a man of such
integrity. He had a strong Christian
faith that was unusual at that time.
And he didn't just talk it. He walked
it, too."
He created the "Flex" defense that
placed one tackle a half-yard behind
the other and he used gadget plays on
offense, notably the quarterback
throwback and the halfback pass.

U U

Live in
New York City
This Summer
NYU Summer Housing
May 21-August V4 2000
Living in an NYU residence hall offers a
safe and convenient home base while you
are worldng, taking classesor doing
an internship.

.= WIDEWOnIS SPfORTS CENTER
SPRING ROLLER HOCKEY COME SUPPORT YOUR
Registration Deadline: March 3rd UNIVERSITY MICHIGAN
Season: March 4th - May 12th ROLLER HOCKEY
Ages: 6 through Adult CLUB TEAM AT THE CRHL
Team Fee: $900 Individual Fee: $95 TOURNAMENT ON MARCH
Adu LogopFomat: 10 O PI 24, 25& 26.
*Drop In Roer Hockty Avallable
For more Detais Cal (734) 913-462 or
Visit Our Website www.wwsports.com
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT

By Brian Steere
For the Dail%
On a surprising note for the Michigan
Athletic Department, there was actually
sports news from Seattle this past week-
end that did not pertain to Jamal
Crawford.
Instead of bringing home more stories
about Barry Henthorn and NCAA viola-
tions, the men's tennis team returned to
Ann Arbor on Sunday with the Great
Northwest Shootout title. The squad's
two victories in Seattle improved their
record to 4-0 on the year.
-The Wolverines began the four-team
(Michigan, Northwestern, Washington,
Tulsa) tournament with an impressive 6-
1 triumph over Tulsa, which gave
Michigan its 900th victory. Following
this landmark win, the team edged host
Washington, 4-3, in the finals to capture
the title.
Inthe match against the Golden
Hurricane, the Wolverines, who are cur-
rently ranked 32nd, posted six straight
singles wins after losing the doubles
point. Despite this impressive run,
Michigan head coach Mark Mees quick-
ly pointed out that it was a hard-fought
victory.
"Tulsa is a very good team, and we
knew this coming in;' Mees said. "The
match was a lot closer than the score
indicated."

In the finals against No. 26
Washington, Michigan provided plenty
of excitement as they stole a victory on
the Huskies' home court. After claiming
the doubles point by winning two of
three doubles matches, the Wolverines
earned a split -in their singles matches
with stellar three-set victories from
I Matt Wright, No. 2 John Long, a d
No. 4 Henry Beam.
After the victory was secured, Mees
expressed his happiness about the play
of his top two senior singles players.
"The match came down to their two
courts, and those are the close wins that
we need to get;' Mees said. "Both Matt
and John played outstanding third sets to
lead our team to victory
After losing the second set in a A
tiebreaker, Wright displayed his trade-
mark mental toughness by taking the
final set 6-2 from the Huskies' No. I sin-
gles player, Matt Hanlin.
In similar fashion, Long rallied for a
7-5 third-set win over Andy Posavac by
claiming the final two games after the
set was even at 5-5.
Beam's three-set singles victory over
Jeremy Berman was just one place
where the big man contributed dui g
the day. Beam also made his presw
felt at No. 3 doubles with senior Ron
Nano.
Beam used his powerful serve to
guide the Michigan duo to an 8-3 win.

what better way to say "1 loe your body'.
this Valentine's Day than with the newest
isse of GARGOYLE HUMOR MAGAINE?

* Minutes from NewYork's business
and cultural centers.

METR1OPVfl ARKIl HAVE OVER 500 JOBS AAIALE
THIS SUMMER IN A DELIGHTFUL PARK ENVIRONMENT
LIFEIARD, NATURALIST. PUBLIC SERVICE ATTENDANT.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan