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February 10, 2000 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-10

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The Michigan Daily - Weekend, etc. Mi

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- The Michigan Daily - Weekend, etc. Magazine - Thursday, February 1U, 2UUU

.. .O .! --- - - r

STILL STRUGGLING

FOR PEACE

Will signing peace agreements end pecopies' preconceived notions of one another? Above: Two Israeli
army officers stand guard in Bethlehem, as one unwarrantedly stares down an Arab-Muslim woman
walking by in the stane. Below: A Palestinian child hides on the rooftops of Jerusalem after throwing
rocks at a group of Jewish students.
P Photos tory
by
Kalick

Will giving back the Gola
for peace, mainly Israel's
Protesters in Northern Isra
tance to give up the Golar
as seen through the barbei
which serves as a buffer t

Tensions arise not only between Jews and Arabs, but within the two groups as well. Here two
Palestinian men are held back from a fight outside of the Old City, Jerusa em.

"Only when there is a genuine supp ort frGon the pe p- - ut / ihe stat nen
nd generals--can a eilation hip h.ei n stake /e genu ine and/ long-lasting."
,alman Shwoa' Fonneir I racl Ambassador to the

With the opening, and subsequent closing, of
recent peace negotiations, leaders of Palestinians,
Israelis and Syrians are again trying to reach solutions
to put a stop to the seemingly never-ending turmoil in
the Middle East. Unable to agree on a framework to
even conduct the talks, Israel and Syria frustratingly
closed their discussions before they really began. In
recent weeks, Palestinian Authority President Yasar
Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak have met
to attempt settling issues on the Palestinian Right of
Return, Israeli withdraw from the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, and the status of Jerusalem.
Yet while the signing of new peace agreements
is always the crucial starting

point, the success of new plans will be deter-
mined only by the willingness of the people
to carry out the terms of those pacts. Two
statesmen can come together to draw up
plans and shake hands, but do they fully rep-
resent the feelings of those that the plans will
govern? Will people believe in those plans
enough to help foster the peace that everyone
wants?
In the coming weeks and months, the
statesmen of these countries will come
together to once again put forth their ideas of
peace. Hopefully the people will be there to
help them follow through.

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