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February 07, 2000 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-07

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28 - The Michigan Daily- SportsMonday - February 7, 2000

CLUBI PT-WEEKLY
Edited by Michael Kern and Ryan C. Moloney
Fencers slash by early competition
Men's team outscores opponents, 48-13

Rhonda Gilmer
For the Daily.
Last Saturday, the Michigan club
fencing team enjoyed a successful sec-
ond meet of the season at Wayne State
University.
The men's club fencing team defeat-
ed Detroit Mercy, 20-7, Michigan
State, 14-3, and Wayne State, 14-3.
The women's club team managed to
pull out a victory against two of the
three teams they faced. They defeated
Detroit-Mercy, 19-8, Michigan State,
22-5 and lost a heartbreaker to Wayne
State, 13-14.
The men's club team is now consid-
:red the best in the state. This comes
is a surprising and triumphant event
considering the youth and inexperi-
,nce of the team.
"I'm proud of the freshmen step-
Iing up after only a few months of
fencing, and taking down experienced
fencers," men's sabre captain, Jake
Laks said.
This loss doesn't come as much of
a shock -- both Wayne State teams
-njoy varsity status.
"We've gone up against some varsi-
:y teams and won," epee co-captain
lill Siegelbaum said. "We don't let our
-lub status define us in tournaments,"

The Wolverines work hard for their
success.
Practicing Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday nights, members drill and spar
to increase their speed and polish their
movements.
Footwork and bladework are essen-
tial to a good fencer and require small,
quick, and well-timed actions. With
only fractions of a second determining
who scores a point, every movement
counts.
Both men's and women's teams'
season begins in January and extends
throagh April. The first weekend in
March is designated as the collegiate
championship.
There are currently 30 members on
the men's team with 16 of those mem-
bers traveling and competing regular-
ly. Their are about 60 members on the
women's club team with 30 of those
members part of the traveling team.
Foil, sabre, and epee are the three
weapons used in fencing. The foil and
sabre are both light weapons used to
score points.
The torso and back are target areas
of the foil - whereas the target area
for the sabre is everything from the
waist up. The epee is a heavier weapon
where the entire body can be used as a
target to score points.

Michigan schedule
Wednesday February 9
Men's Basketball at Illinois, 7 p.m.
Friday February 11
Women's Tennis at N.C. State, 11a.m.
Men's Gymnastics at Winter Cup Challenge,
3:30 p.m.
Women's Gymnastics vs. Georgia, 7 p.m.
Wrestling vs. Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Hockey vs. Western Michigan, 7:35 p.m.
Men's Tennis at Great Northwest Shoot-out,
all day.
Men's Track and Field at Michigan
Intercollegiate, TBA
Women's Track and Field at Canon Classic,
TBA
Saturday February 12
Wrestling vs. Indiana, 7 p.m.
Hockey es. Western Michigan, 7:05 p.m.
Men's Gymnastics at Winter Cup Challenge,
8:00 p.m.
Men's Tennis at Great Northwest Shoot-out,
all day
Women's Track and Field at Canon Classic,
TBA
Sunday February 13
Men's Basketball vs. Indiana, 1:00 p.m.
Women's Basketball vs. Indiana, 4:00 p.m.
Men's Tennis at Great Northwest Shoot-out,
all day
Colleg basketball
SUNDAY'S SCORES
Lehigh 75 vs. ARMY 49
North Carolina 73, CLEMSON 60
DAYTON 93, Duquesne 77
Towson St 45, DREXEL 63
Delaware 70, HOFSTRA 82
IONA 96, Niagara 82
MANHATTAN 85, Lotla, Md 60
-21 MARYLAND 7822, No Carolina St 73
-8 Ohio St 88, MICHIGAN 67
-9 Tennessee 88, MISSISSIPPI ST 81
Depaul 80, NC CHARLOTTE 66
NORTHERN ILL1.69, Miami Ohio 59
Illinois 51, PENN ST 50
PITTSBURGH 72, Notre Dame 66
Fordhan 73, ST BONAVENTURE 68
Cdnisius 76, ST. PETERS 61
SW MISSOURI ST 64, Indiana St 48
SATURDAY'S SCoRES

=13 Texas 68, MASSACHUSETTS 57
-6 MICHIGAN ST 85, =7 Connecticut 66
Wisconsin 66, MINNESOTA 64
UNLV 72,-*19 Utah 66
1I Indiana 89, NORTHWESTERN 67
=14 OKLAHOMA ST 87, Texas A&M 55
4 Syracuse 74, PROVIDENCE 58
*20 Temple 74, RHODE ISLAND 40
x16 TULSA 103, TCU 70
=2 Stanford 67, USC 57
Men's gymnastics poll
NCAA Top 20, Jan. 31

Who: Jay Cantin
Year: Senior

Why: Cantin broke the four minute mark for the 1st time in his career
with an NCAA provisional qualifying time of 3:59.90. His time was the
second best in the nation this season.
Background: Cantin was an All-Amdrican last year and Big Ten mile
champion. He finished 12th at the 1999 NCAA championships.

IIfpe ihdIifjan ttg
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Sport: Track and Field
Event: One-mile run

Team Team average
1. Michigan 228.825
2. PennState 228.375
3. Ohio State 228.275
4. Oklahoma 228.025
5. Illinois 225.825
6.Iowa 225.625
7. California 224.925
8. Nebraska 223.925
9. Illinois-Chicago 222.425
10. Mass 222.050
11. Michigan State 221.925
12. Minnesota 221.325
13. Brigham Young 221.050
14. Stanford 220.050
15. Temple 218.250
16. Navy 214.800
17. Air Force 214.425
18. William&Mary 212.800
19. Army 212.250
20. Ari:ona State 208.050

women set pair of
Big Ten record times

Women's gymnastics poll
NCAA Top 20, Feb. 1

The Second Best Team in Yost
Club Hockey Looking for a No. 1 Seed

Team Team average
1. Alabama 196.2900
2. Michigan 196.0875
3. Georgia 195.9750
4. Utah 195.6833
5. UCLA 195.5250
6. Nebraska 194.7312
7. L.S.U. 194.6437
8. Penn State 194.3500
9. Stamnford Univ. 194.2000
10. Iowa State 193.8667
11. Denver 193.7875
12. Minnesota 193.3625
13. Washington 193.2583
14. NhQ i Se193.2375
15. Oklahoma 193.1750
16. New Hampshire 193.1187
17. West Virginia 193.1167
18. Arizona State 193.0937
19. Ball State 193.0437
20. Brigham Young 193.0083

By Brian Stoore
For the Daily
Ns a result of the success of the
Michigan men's hockey team, it's easy
:o assume that no other winning team
plays at Yost lee Arena. But, the men's
:lub hockey team has quietly emerged
is a powerful juggernaut.
Under the direction of second year
:oach Mike Radakovich, the team fin-
.shed up their regular season with a 19-
3-2 mark, following victories this past
weekend over Central Michigan and
Michigan State Next up for the team is
:he Midwest Collegiate Hockey League
'MCH L) playoff tournament in Dayton
n February 18 and 19.
The team is a member of the
division I American Collegiate
- >ckey Association (ACHA) and plays
3: the MCHL. Seven other teams make
ip this league incidding Kentucky,
Ohio State and defending champion
indiana.
Because of their impressive regular
;eason, the club earned a second con-
;ecutive trip to the national tournament,
which will be held in Indianapolis
March 1-4. Sixteen teams from four
different regions (Northeast, Central,
CLUe RESULTS
WOMEN'S HOCKEY
Feb. 4 Michigan 1, Michigan State 1
Feb. 5 Michigan 2, Michigan State 1

West, Southeast) will make up the field.
The Wolverines are coming out of the
Southeast region and hoping to capture
the title.
"Our goal at the beginning of the sea-
son was just to make it back to nation-
als," captain Jason Kiehler said. "But
after our sttong regular season, we feel
that we can win the championship"
The club finished last season ranked
No. 9 in the final national poll. But,
Kiehler believes that this year's team is
even stronger.
"Our team has tremendous depth,
and we are solid at every position,"
Kiehler said. "This is the best team
we've had in my four years at
Michigan."
Depending on the final rankings
which will come out this week, the club
will head into the national tournament
seeded first or second. This means that
the team will be bracketed with three
different seeds from the other regions
for the first part of the tournament.
This first part consists of a round-
robin where all four teams in the four
brackets play against each other. Then
the top four teams from each bracket
advance to the semi-finals where they'll
face each other to decide the champi-
Club Schedule
Men's Volleyball
Feb. 9 Mich. vs. MSU, 8 p.m. CCRB
Women's Hockey
Feb. 11 Mich. vs. LSU, 10:30 p.m.
Yost

-25 LSU 93, ALABAMA 60
-5 ARIZONA 90, Oregon St 73
-10 AUBURN 73, Arkansas 55
-1 Cincinnti 93, UAB 80
-17 Oklahoma 68, BAYLOR 59
-3 DUKE 106, Virginia 86
Ball St 78, EASTERN MICH 58
Purdue 84, IOWA 58
-15 KANSAS 87, Texas Tech 62
-17 KENTUCKY 76,.South Carolina 63

By David Edelman
Daily Sports Writer
The Michigan women's track and
field team began the month of February
with different goals but the same high
expectations.
With the Big Ten Championships
approaching, the Wolverines switched
their focus from conditioning to refin-
ing and speed work in hopes that a
greater emphasis .would be placed on
individual scores.
This strategy paid off this past week-
end at the Meyo Invitational in South
Bend, when two individual victories
topped the Big Ten record books.
Stellar performances -came from
seniors and freshmen alike - both
classes have contributed to the team's
success this season.
Senior captain Maria Brown placed
first in the 200-meter dash. Her time of
24.33 marked the best in the Big Ten
this year. Brown also placed second in
the 60-meter run.
Following Brown in the 200-meter
was freshman Carly Knazze who ran a
personal best of 24.62.
The Wolverines finished strong in
the distance and middle-distance
events, as well.
, Junior Regine Caruthers accounted
for Michigan's other victory. She fin-
ished first in the 500-meter run with a
Huskies rocked
by Spartans at
Breslin Center
EAST LANSING (AP) - Michigan
State coach Tom Izzo called it a story-
book game. Connecticut's Jim Calhoun
called it shocking.
Guess whose team won?
Charlie Bell opened each half with a
3-pointer as Michigan State bombed the
Huskies 85-66 in a long-awaited battle
between two of last season's Final Four
teams Saturday.
The Spartans, aided by a 15-9 edge in
offensive rebounds, scored 25 second-
chance points and got 20 points off
turnovers.
It was a school-record 24th straight
home win for the No. 8 Spartans (17-5),
breaking a mark set during the early
1930s and matched during the mid-
1960s.
The loss snapped a three-game win-
ning streak for seventh-ranked
Connecticut (16-5), the Big East power-
house which is 11-2 in nonconference
games. The Huskies' other nonconfer-
ence loss was to Iowa, another Big Ten
team.
"I admired Michigan State's game.
And I hated it," Calhoun said.
Morris Peterson led the Spartans
with 16 points, freshman Jason
Richardson scored 14, A.J. Granger

time of 1:13.62.
Other successful runners included
junior Katie Ryan who was the runner-
up in the 5,000 with a time of 17:05.82,
and senior Lisa Ouellet who placed
second in the mile. Her time of 4:49.92
is currently fifth best in the Big Ten this
season.
"The mile is usually a nemesis of
mine but I felt really confident at the
meet;' Ouellet said. "There were some
really fierce competition at the meet,
but the team responded well."
The competing athletes were under
quite a bit of pressure during this met. *
The Wolverines looked at thisnon-scor-
ing meet as a chance to prepare for the
upcoming Big Ten Championships
because the event provided runners
with one of their last opportunities to
qualify for the NCAA Indoor
Championships.
"I don't believe that individual com--
petition hurts the team effort," Ouellet
said. "All the hard work that takes place
out on the track goes into helping the
team. Things are beginning to look the@
way we want them to.
"Our freshmen are coming along and
the team is contributing as a whole. We
are in the running for the championship
more than people may think."
The women's track team will com-
pete in the Cannon Classic this week-
end in Indianapolis.
had 13 and Bell 11.
Khalid El-Amin scored 21 and Albert
Mourning added 13 for the cold-shoot-
ing Huskies, who hit only 26-of-60 from
the field. The Huskies played without
Tony Robertson and Doug Wrenn,
freshman reserves who were suspended
indefinitely Friday for unspecified vio-
lations of team rules.
NFL Pro-Bowlers.
shine in Hawaii
HONOLULU (AP) - Randy Moss
set records with nine catches for 212
yards, and Mike Alstott scored three
touchdowns in the NFC's 51-31 victory
over the yesterday in the highest-scor-
ing Pro Bowl ever.
Arizona's Aeneas Williams and
Tampa Bay's Derrick Brooks returned
interceptions for touchdowns as the
NFC dominated the game from the
start in snapping a three-game AFC
win streak.
The 82 points broke the record of 64
set in 1980.
Moss, the 6-foot-4 Minnesota star
selected the MVP, used his height
advantage to outleap the AFC defen-
sive backs, particularly 5-11 Sam
Madison of Miami and 6-foot James
Hasty of Kansas City.
Moss' last catch was a 25-yard TD
reception from Carolina's Steve.
Beuerlein with 1:05 tQ play that closed
the scoring.

NBA Standings

NHL Standings

EASITERN
O.rtm ko
Ncw Jti-y
CENTRAL
Milowaukee
I ir, 'hnc
MWDNVEST
Im .Antornia,
M iniwwtr
I7cnvr~r
PACMFC
LA L Aarm
(.oldrnSowe

W L PCT GB
29) 17 .61k -
28 17 .622 3
26 21 .M 43
22 26.458 8s
21 26-447 83
1S 29.383 12.5
1j 33.311 1i.5

HOME AWAY STK
IM- 13.12 Wn 2
168 1011 Won I
10.12 21.14 Won 2
17.7 41'S ' I
10-14 5"1) La.'r

W L PCT GB HOME AWAY STK

1' 16 .6it
25 20.556
2520 i55
26 22 .542
24 21 310
19 28.404
IS 27'r4A52
10 35 .450

4.5
4.5
5
7
11.5
11.5
20

20.2
18-3
1 i-S
14-3
15-7
6-16

10-14
7-17
10.12
12.14
H-16
4-29
i-17
3.20

Wo4 2
LWn I
Woni Z

CENTRAL '
Fahn ttx 1 ,2
\2'nccxrve'r
PACIFIC '
L4~v .Anpek^,
NORTHEAST'
R+-. 'on
ATLANTIC
Pib1&tphia
N1' R~itit'.r-.
Pit~htt~h
N3' 1.n r,9r
SOUTMEAST'
C oroitm
T:IMN Kay
Mim i

W L T
ii 14 6
3116 6
20 28 6
IS 28 7

w
IS
15

RT PTS HOME
0 72 6-4
2 69 21-5-2
4 iO 1C-12.3
2 45 9-143
RT PTS HOME
1 61 16-5-3
7 %6 12-6-9
2 54 15.7-4
6 46 &-174
RT YTS HOME
i 6 5 I ll-'
2 65 15.10-I
7 iS 1lI-2
3 56 13.9.3
I 531_'2-11-4
RT PTs HOME
S6) Hi -4
2 61 13-5
4 54 9-11-S
1 50 14-104
2 45 9-11-5
RT PTS HOME
4 75 21-4-2
1 631 6-5-5
3 56 1_'-12-2
5 55 16-9-3
1 33 6 1 -
R YTS HOME
1 67 1-i-2
1 5') 16-4-6
0 50 13.11-3
5 35 9-14-3
4 i 2 S-16.2

AWAY
1 7-,-2
1041.4
10.163
9-144
AWAY
10- IS-
6-164
S-17-'
7-10.6
AWAY
14-10-4
14.9.4
9-IS-i
10.12-4
AWAY
11-13-2
12411-4
9-I11-6
7-1i-3
9.1i-'
AWAY
1{L10-5
11.11-i
7-17-1
7.16.3
AWAY
I1I.13-2
9-14-2
S- 14-i
3-19.3
i1.4

W L PCT GB
30 17.6 k -
27 18.6003 2.5
28i ISM, \'2.>
21 24 .467 8.5
20 27 .46 I
19 29.345 11.5
113.279 165
W L PCT GB
k) I I.7M6 -
35 11 .761 .5
3i'19 .12 6
28 18.618 6.5
27 19 .58 2.5
121 .268 22
11 16 .:31 24

To contact the Michigan Daily about printing club sports information in this
section, e-mail the sports desk at dailyclubsports@umich.edu.
DAILY SPORTS:
THE HIPPEST CLUB IN TOWN

HOME AWAY STK
19.4 11.13 Ld'.t1
15.8 12-10W Wn'
16.7 I1-Il Wo'n1
189 3-15 L2
11.11 8-l17 "Wtn 3
12-131 7-16 Lxt 2
7-l7 6- iS Loi
HOME AWAY STK
IS-1 14.8 Wt,,n2
21-4 14-7 Wn i
15-S 3i-Il Lot I
17-3 11.14 Lit 2
19-i S4 W4n I
7.17 5.s5i1s
(li ctx)I12.LA CiMi%90
13+.ILis 403, V n ouvWr

fhlktrtliC11. Bo-nvkn 9 IC
13..noir I,I H xt wt 105

Ytxtrrdav's re'ult:
ALL STAR G;AME
WoArki. .AlI tr- '"),Nrth Angtitin AlStars 4

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La~' IAA:

Americans routed
by World, 9-4
TORONTO (AP) - A rout and a
shutout. Obviously, this wasn't a
normal NHL All-Star game.
Pavel Bure scored three goals ,
no surprise there - and goaltender
Olaf Kolzig played a rare shutout
period as the World team turned the
50th All-Star game into an uncom-
mon rout, dominating North
America 9-4 on Pavel's first twg
goals yesterday.
The Russian Rocket's third goal
came as the World stars erupted for
four goals in the third period.
All three came against Mike
Richter of the New York Rangers.
The hat trick was the 1th in All-
Star history, but the fourth in four
years in a game that has increasing-
ly emphasized offense, with an aver-
age of 16 goals scored over the las0
10 years.
That's what made Kolzig's shutout
third period so unusual, and his play
helped the World stretch a 5-4 lead
at start of the period into a blowout.

this summer, pack your
underwear, your toothbrush
and your [ u
19 1m

Planning Trips for Generations
X,"Y,andZ.

,,,...

33

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