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February 02, 2000 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-02-02

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The Mich.gan Daily - Wednesday, February 2, 2000 -11

'M' gymnastics
second in poll
After demolishing Kentucky
197.5-192.05 last Friday, the
Michigan women's gymnastics team
has risen to the No. 2 spot in the lat-
est GYMINFO National Rankings.
The Wolverines' average meet score
of 196.0875 places them just below
top-ranked Alabama, who finished
the weekend with an average of
196.29.
When Michigan set the nation's
highest individual meet score against
Kentucky, many gymnastics
observers expected that the
Wolverines would claim the top spot
in this week's poll. But Alabama sub-
sequently rose to the occasion, meet-
g Michigan's level of excellence by
scoring a 197.050 against nemesis
Georgia and a 197.000 against in-
state rival Auburn in two weekend
meets.
Last week the Wolverines were
ranked third behind No. I Utah and
No. 2 Alabama. However, the Utes
misfired in their last meet, scoring
-only a 194.8 in a loss to Louisiana
State. They are currently ranked
fourth, with an average of 195.6833.
Michigan will take to the mat
:again this Sunday in Kalamazoo,
when the team participates in the
State of Michigan Classic and aims
to join the Michigan men's gymnas-
tics team at the top of the polls.
The men's team is ranked first in
the nation for the second consecutive
weeks.
- Sarah Ensor

Spartans flock to An
State fans hold pep rally on Crisler steps to cheer on team

By Jon Zemke
Daily Sports Writer
Dozens of Michigan State basket-
ball fans found themselves out in the
cold in front of Crisler Arena last
night before the Michigan-Michigan
State basketball game.
The group of more than 100
Michigan State fans gathered on the
steps of Crisler Arena at the Stadium
Street entrance prior to the game
chanting, singing the fight song and
waving a large Michigan State flag.
"It's all about supporting the team
and showing Spartan Spirit,"
Michigan State junior Jarrod Folsom
said.
The group of fans were passing out
green and white pom-poms and
copies of "The Half Court Press," a
satirical Michigan State student run
leaflet that claimed to be "The
Official Newsletter of the Izzone."
"We pass out newsletters every
home game for the Izzone,"
Michigan State sophomore Adam
Raak said. "We did it for this game

too becuase it's so close."
The handouts were sponsored by
the Michigan State Alumni associa-
tion Raak said.
Among the topics was "ticketgate."
Some of the Spartan fans thought
that Michigan purposely tried to keep
State fans from buying tickets.
"A lot of people looked at it as if
we were protesting, but we aren't."
Raak said. "This is more of a pep
rally for the team than a protest.
"They tried to keep us out but we
got a few tickets."
Folsom said tickets for the game
were available to the general public
on the first day of sale, but each per-
son was limited to purchasing four
tickets.
After the first day though, they
were only available to University stu-
dents, faculty and staff. By the time
the tickets were once again available
to the general public in January, the
game was sold out.
"Even though it's cold and they
didn't want to sell us tickets we still
got some," Folsom said. "If it were us

though, we would do it to them too."
Folsom and Raak headed the initial
contingent of 14 Michigan State fans
that led the rally. Most of the fans
said they hadn't purchased their tick-
ets from the University but from
alternative sources.
"I got my ticket from a friend of a
friend of a friend," Michigan State
sophomore Jenny Doepker said.
. Doepker said that her group had
heard that up to 2,000 Michigan
State students had gotten tickets,
despite the limited opportunity to
purchase tickets offered by
Michigan.
Some of the fans were actively
looking for game tickets on the steps
of Crisler, despite Department of
Public Safety officers roaming
through the crowds.
DPS Sgt. Ty Chatell said that there
were 10 officers at Crisler Arena for
the game, two of whom were
assigned to curtail scalping outside.
"We always have at least one offi-
cer at a basketball game to curtail
ticket scalping," Chatell said.

DAVID KATZ/Daily
Dozens of ticket-less Michigan State fans rallied at the Crisler Arena steps last
night to cheer on their team by singing the school's fight song.

Senior to return for next dual meet

I IIJNJVER,~ . IT Y OF W ISCONSIN 1

Rams coach done
after 'super' win
ST. LOUIS - Dick Vermeil is
going out on top.
Yesterday, two days after winning
is first Super Bowl and after a long
talk with his wife, the 63-year-old
coach of the St. Louis Rams
announced his retirement.
His eyes filled with tears and his
voice choked with emotion, Vermeil
said it was "an unbelievable feeling"
to leave as a champion.
"I think the time is right," he said,
the Super Bowl trophy sitting on a
table to his right. "Very few people
in this profession get this opportuni-
This exit was a lot different than
the first time he walked away from
NFL coaching, complaining of
burnout when he left the
Philadelphia Eagles.
The decision elevates offensive
coordinator Mike Martz to coach.
The Rams signed Martz, who direct-
ed the NFL's top-rated offense (33
0oints a game) to a two-year con-
.act in December that assured he
would inherit Vermeil's job.
"I told everyone before the season
that Mike Martz was the type of
coach who would go after it - from
the first game to the last," said Isaac
Bruce, who caught the winning
touchdown pass in the Super Bowl.
Martz, scheduled for surgery for a
neck problem, didn't attend the news
conference.
- Vermeil coached two Super Bowl
ams 19 years apart. ,He led the
Philadelphia Eagles to the Super
Bowl in 1981, and that 27-10 loss
fueled his return to the profession in
1997. He leaves the Rams with two
years to go on a five-year contract.
Vermeil led the Rams to a 13-3
record this year after winning only
nine games his first two years.
Vermeil was close to missing this
ason because of his disastrous
eginning with the team. After the
Rams went 5-l and 4-12 in his first
two seasons, there was talk that he
could be fired.
NFL Pro Bowler
arrested for murder
ATLANTA (AP) - Pro Bowl line-
backer Ray Lewis was charged with
urder late Monday in the slayings of
two people outside an Atlanta night-
club hours after the Super Bowl.
Lewis, middle linebacker for the
Baltimore Ravens and the NFLs lead-
ing tackler this season, was -arrested
after a day of investigation into the
slaying near the Cobalt Lounge in
Atlanta's Buckhead neighborhood
about 4 a.m. Monday. He is the sec-
nd NFL player charged with murder
is month.
Lewis was taken into custody and
was expected to appear in court -yes-
terday morning. Earlier Monday, he
told reporters that he had been ques-
tioned by policeabut clearedof any
wrongdoing.

WARREN
Continued from Page 10
Dec. 30, has been excited about get-
ting back onto the mat and showing
more of the fire that he showed when
he beat Michigan State's Jason
Nusbaum on Dec. 10, his only dual
meet matchup so far this year.
"He's practicing now," McFarland
said. "There's no question he'll be in
for our next dual"
Despite speculation that Warren
would be in uniform over the past
two weekends, the senior star could
only be seen on the sidelines, wear-
ing a Michigan wrestling polo shirt,
and really blending in with the
coaches.
Perhaps a bit too closely.
Warren's intense attitude knew no
difference between rolling around on
the mat and helping his teammates
out.
At times, whether for bizarre calls
by the referee or a great/terrible shot
for one of the Michigan grapplers,
Warren was on his feet even before
McFarland.
But with all of Michigan's recent
victories coming by so slim a margin,
the coach was not willing to allow
any points to swing over to the other
team unnecessarily.

"A couple oftimes I had to tell him
to sit down," McFarland said, laugh-
ing. "If anyone on this team is going
to lose a point for arguing a call, it's
going to be a coach."
LEADING THE PACK: When the
team's stars went down, different
leaders had to shine. The coaches did
their best to find them, and if the last
few weeks have been any indication,
184-pound Andy Hrovat should be
leading this team for the next few
years.
Without Otto Olson, Warren, and
165-pound Jason Rawls, who could
not join the team for the weekend,
Hrovat became the hero. One of two
Wolverines to win both matches over
the weekend, Hrovat continued a
winning streak that started at the
Virginia Duals when he won all five
matches.
Damion Logan, Michigan's 141-
pound All-American last season, who
also won both matches, was rebound-
ing from possibly his poorest perfor-
mance of the season in the past week-
end's matches against Northwestern
and Michigan State. That weekend
was the first when Logan actually
showed signs of inconsistency, but
with a fall on Sunday and a big win
Friday, he appears to be back on
track.

Without Warren
Fourth-ranked Joe Warren's various
replacements at the 133-pound
position left the team
hoping for its star's retum.
The subs failed to match the senior
star's potential numbers, going only 2-
9 in Warren's month-long absence:
1/7 Air Force - Matt Michalski L 5-9
1/7 Indiana - Mich!ki L 3-8
1/8 Northern Iowa - A.J. Grant L 2-9
118VirginiaTech -Mat Warner W 10-2
/8 Lehigh -Warner W 4-0
1/15 Pennsylvania -WarnerL 2-6
1/16 Central Michigan - Grant L 1-3
1/21 Northwestern-Michalski L 5-6
1/23 Michigan State - Michalski L 0-8
1/28 Illinois - Michabki L 3-9
1/30 Purdue - Michalski L 3-13

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