100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 27, 2000 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Icoreboard--

MEN'S NCAA
BASKETBALL
(20) Vanderbilt 61,
SOUTH CAROLINA 60
(16) Kentucky 75,
GEORGIA 69
(15) OKLA. ST. 71,
Kansas St. 56
(10) Florida at
DEPAUL, inc.

NBA
BASKETBALL
TORONTO 120,
Washington 105
Phoenix 93,
PHILADELPHIA 87
ORLANDO 111.
Boston 89
MILWAUKEE 112.
Sacramento 104

NHL
HOCKEY
DETROIT 4,
Toronto 2
New Jersey 3,
FLORIDA2
Washington 2,
CALGARY 1
St. Louis 4,
OTTAWA 1

¢IV,

Tracking 'M' beginnings
The Michigan men's soccer team released the sched-
ule for its inaugural season yesterday. The Wolverines
will open Aug. 25 at Evansville and play their first
home match on Elbel Field against DePaul, Sept. 3.

Thur day
January 27, 100

lOAI

'M' hoops heads
to Happy Valley
Wolverines look for Big Ten lead

Hoosier basketball larger than life'

Conference

Team
Penn State
Michigan State
Michigan
Illinois
Purdue
Wisconsin
Northwestern
Ohio State
Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota

7
5
5
4
4
3
2
2
2
1

L
t
2
2
3
3
3
4
5
b
6
6

w
16
14
13
15
12
10
6
9
7
5
8

L
3
4
7
5
6
11
8
11
12
10

By Arun Gopal
Daily Sports Writer
To borrow from ring announcer
Michael Buffer: "LLLLet's get ready
to rumblllle!"
The battle lines are drawn, and the
fight is about to begin.
Tonight, the Michigan women's
basketball team faces a huge test when
they take on the seventh-ranked Penn
State Lady Lions at the Bryce Jordan
Center in State College.
Under any circumstances, beating
the Lady Lions would be difficult.
Led by senior co-captains Helen
Darling and Andrea Garner. the
Nittany Lions won 16 of their first 18
games en route to a No. 4 national
ranking.
But Penn State's veneer of invinci-
bility came crashing down on Sunday
at Michigan State. Aided by a 2-3
zone defense, the Spartans held the
Lady Lions scoreless for over eight
minutes in the second half.
During this same period, Michgan
State tallied 16 points, which enabled
the Spartans to pull off a huge upset,
71-63.
In fairness, it must be noted that
Penn State was shorthanded in East
Lansing.
Sophomore forward Rashana
Barnes missed the game due to injury.
This left the Lady Lions at a disad-'
vantage against Michigan State senior
forward Kristen Rasmussen, who
racked up 17 points and 11l rebounds
in the victory.
Now, coming off of that loss, Penn
State is out for blood.
Michigan, which can tie Michigan
State and Penn State for a share of the
Big Ten lead with a win, is the Lady
Lions' target.
"There's no doubt that they're going
to be a little more motivated," Guevara
said. "I saw that game tape against

Michigan State, and they just couldn't
find the basket.
"They're going to come out to prove
that they're still tops in the Big Ten,
and they'll probably get some rolls'at
home that they didn't get in East
Lansing."
The preseason favorite to win the
Big Ten title, the Lady Lions are
spearheaded by Darling and Garner,
who comprise one of the top inside-
outside tandems in the country.
Darling leads the Big Ten in assists,
while Garner tops the conference in
blocks. Together, they present a huge
challenge for the Wolverines.
"We're going to have to slow them
down," Guevara said.."They've been
playing together for four years. We'll
have Stacey Thomas on Darling, and
since Garner gets out well on the fast
break, we're going to need good tran-
sition defense as well.
"But, they also have to slow us
down. Garner's gonna have to guard
Goodlow and Bies, so maybe we can
get some fouls on her."
One of Michigan's big keys every
game - strong performances from
their post players - will be especially
crucial tonight in State College.
The Wolverines' three-headed post
monster of Raina Goodlow, LeeAnn
Bies, and Alison Miller cannot allow a
superb inside presence like Garner t'o
get good position on the low blocks.
Meanwhile. on offense, Michigan's
trio has to solve two things that have
plagued them all year: blowing easy
layups and surrendering offensive
rebounds.
Everyone in the arena knows more
or less what to expect from Michigan
guards Anne Thorius and Alayne
Ingram and small forward Stacey
Thomas.
However, the Michigan centers and
forwards have been about as consis-

Yesterday's results:
Indiana 63, NORTHWESTERN 62
Tonight'sgames:
MICHIGAN at Penn State, 7:30 p.m.
Wisconsin at IOWA, 8 p.m.
Purdue at MINNESOTA, 8 p.mr.
Michigan State at OHIO STAT p.m.
This weekend's cames:
Minnesota at MICHIGAN, Noon
Indiana at OHIO STATE, 1 p.m.1
Northwestern at PURDUE, 1 p.m.
Michigan State at ILUNOIS, 2 p.m.
Penn State at WISCONSIN, 1 p.m.
tent as the futures market
"I feel like, reccntly, our post play
ers have been more consstent,
Guevara said. "If anythine I tink tht
our perimeter players will have to step
up. They haven't been very consisic.t
scoring recently:
If the Wolverines can pull off an
upset in this battle for BiT Ten
supremacy, it will undoubtedly be a
huge boost to their confidence.
So far this conference season.
Michigan has had a somewhat baffling
penchant for beating the good tes,
like Purdue and Illinois, and Iosing to
teams that they should handle, like
Indiana and Wisconsin.
So, coach, will the trend continue'
"One thing we've done veriyv ell is
play well against the ranked teams,"
Guevara said. "Hopefully, we can con-
tinue that.
"But we can't get too sky-high over
this game whether we win or lose.
because we have to come out Sunday
and play Minnesota, which happens to
be the worst team in the conierence.
"We need to approach each game
with the same intensity."

By David Den Herder
and Jacob Wheeler
Daily Sports Writers
GAS CITY, Ind. - To a passive
observer, the name of Michigan guard
Gavin Groninger's hometown -
Plainfield, Ind. - might aptly describe
the entire Hoosier State.
Even this quaint little burg in central
Indiana, Gas City, a convenient pitstop on
the I-69 return trip from Bloomington,
does little to dispel the stereotype.
But several cross-state explorations
reveal what must be obvious to every
Hoosier: Indiana is hardly unified in geo-
graphical -or cultural -- monotony.
The rocky terrain and Kentucky blue-
grass influence in the southern half of the
state contrast the endless flatlands and
somewhat nasal, Chicagoland accents of
the north. Indiana doesn't even have a
common time zone. The northwestern
portion uses Central Time, while the east
uses Central Daylight Time in the sum-
mer and Eastern Standard Time in the
winter.
Even so, most residents, north or
south, won't deny a common bond: their
infatuation with basketbal. When it's 5
p.m. in Gary, it's 6 p.m. in Bloomington,
and mom, dad and the kids. all anticipate

their team - be it the Indiana Hoosiers
of college hoops or the Indiana Pacers of
the NBA - soon taking the court.
Only in this state does it seem possible
that the woman working the register at a
McDonald's in Angola has no idea which
time zone she lives in, but she knows
exactly who is set to play Indiana at
Assembly Hall that night.
Most recently, that night was Tuesday,
and that team was Michigan.
And even though the Hoosiers were
up by 30 points for most of the second
half, there was not an empty seat in
the house at Assembly Hall - the
cathedral of college basketball - up
to and through the final buzzer.
Most of the faithful even staved for
one more chorus of "Our Indiana"
despite knowing what the outcome of
the game would be an hour earlier.
Nevermind that it was a schoolnight
- another Big Ten victory in
Bloomington was cause for spillover into
the local bars. Indiana students at Yogi's
-a local joint two blocks off campus -
feasted on mini-corndogs and local brew,
putting down their pool cues only to
watch game highlights replayed on
ESPN.
The bartender chimes in as Bob

Knight graces the row of televisions
above his head.
"He may not always have the most tal-
ent, but he gets the most out of every
player."
Even two seniors quietly sitting in the
corner, who "were bored" at 1 a.m. and .
decided to hit the bar, knew exactly what
their team had done that night, despit*
never setting foot in Assembly Hall.
"Everyone's happy now" says one of
the girls between sips of a drink she
claims not to know the name of. "You
should see this place when we lose, peo-
ple are so pissed."
As swing the Hoosiers, so swing the
emotions of Indiana students, and proba-
bly the collective emotion of the state.
But there does seem to be one common-
ality that never sways. From the mound
tainous south to the flat-lying north,
everybody feels at least some connection
to the hardwood.
That is why, while the Citgo atten-
dant and Subway sandwich artist can
come up with two completely differ-
ent explainations on how Gas City,
got its name, both will offer up a
smile - no matter how slight -
when somebody says the Hoosicrs
were victorious.
ts to
"We'll finish with the hard trainin,,
this week, but because Notre Dame is.
the final dual meet of the season, we'ld
taper the yardage down," Kerska said-
"The girls are really looking forward to
that, as we ready ourselves for Big Tens;.
and NCAAs."
This winter has been particularly
rough for athletes, who have comeU'
down with strong strains of the cold and-
flu. Swimmers are particularly vulnera-A
ble to viruses that affect the lungs.
"I would rather one of our swimmers
get a stomach flu than one in the chest,
Richardson said. "At least one in to
stomach can go away quickly, where a
bronchial infection can last weeks or
months. In the water, breathing is
everything."
"We've been pretty healthy, no bouts
with flu right now," Kerska said. "We
better knock on wood, though."

omen's swim figh

By Sam Duwe
1) Sports Writer
The fried Rice of last weekend was
tasty, but Michigan swimmers have a
hankering for something a little more
filling for ending their regular season
with - Wildcat kabobs and Lucky
Charms.
This feast of champions won't come
easy for Michigan coach Jim
Richardson and the womemi swimmers
of his dynasty, who easily handled Rice
last Saturday. The Wolverines, who are
ranked eighth in the College Swimming
Coaches Poll, will mcet No. 10
Northwestern and No. 23 Notre Dame
on Friday and Saturday, respectively.
"It's going to be a bairn-burner!"
Richardson said.
Northwestern's squad feaitures six all-
Americans while Notre Dame has a
perfect 9-0 record. Michigan beat both

teams in dual-meet competition last
season.
Assistant coach Stefanie Kerska
agreed with Richardson.
"The swimmers are matched up
across the board," Kerska said. "It
should be a battle all the way from first
place to fifth."
Although Michigan wants to win
these two meets for bragging rights, the
Wolverines plan to take more home
than a better ranking.
"This weekend will be great prepara-
tion for the postseason championships?'
Kerska said. "We'll have two days of
hard swimming, which can wear you
out, but if we can successfully do it
now, it shows that we can do it in Big
Tens."
This weekend will also mark a fun-
damental change in the way the team
operates.

..-m"

. ............. NOW

c A_... ... -"--"---

jw

I.

ITALIAN RESTAURANT @

NOBODY lives by BREAD alone.
So we throw in SOUP & SALAD, too.
UNLIMITED SOUP, SALAD & BREADSTICKS LUNCH: $4.95!
When we say unlimited soup, salad
and breadsticks, we're not kidding.
So even though it's only $4.95,
you still get as much as you want
of all three - fresh garden salad, warm garlic
breadsticks and great soups like our

4

4

Pasta e Fagioli. That's

4

r

,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan