100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 2000 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2000-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 26, 2000

Quote of the game
"1 think you are the finest, cleanest people in
the world."
- Indiana coach Bobby Knight, after he shook the
hands of every reporter in the press conference fol-
lowing his teams 35-point thrashing of Michigan.

M Indiana 85

Player of the game
Indiana guard A.J. Guyton
Guvton scored 18 points on 6-for- 12 shooting
and led a tenacious defense that held Michigan tC
25 percent fin thefield

S

Michigan

50

Knight extremely friendly to press

MICHIGAN (50)
FG FT RFB
MIN M-A NiA A O-T A F PTS
Blanchard 35 719 4-4 513 0 1 19
Jones 17 0-2 1-5 0-1 3 2 1
Asselin 20 1-4 0-3 1-6 1 4 2
Crawford 35 4-13 2-3 0-2 2 0 12
Gaines 22 1-13 4-5 0-1 2 3 6
Taylor 4 01 0-0 01 0 1 0
Groningen 25,0-6 0-0 0-1 0 2 0
Smith 17 0-0 2-2 2-5. 0 4. 2
Young 14 2-3 2-4 3-8 0 0 6
Vignier: 11 1-3 -0-0 1-4 0 3 2
Totals 200 16-64 15-2612-42 8 20 50
FG 250 FT .577 3-point FG: 3-14 214 (Blancsard
1.3, Crawford 2-4, Gaines 0-3. Groninger- 0-4). Blocks: 4
(Assein 2, You 2). Steafs: 3 (Crawford, Smith, Young).
Turnovers: 18 (Crawford 3, Jones 3, Smth 3, Gaines 2,
Vignier 2. Young 2, Asselin, Blanchard, Taylor). Technical
Fouls: Michigan bench.
At:Assembly Hall
Attendance: 17,326

INDIANA (85)
FG FT REB
MIN MA M-A O-T A F PTS
Washington 20 3-7 3-4 3-6 1 3 9
Newton 26 4-13 1-2 2-9 2 2 10
Haston 22 6-12 7-8 1-11 2 2 19
Fife 24 2-2 1.2 0-2 5 1 6
Guyton 28 6-12 4-4 1-2 4 1 18
Coverdale 7 0-1 1-2 0-1 1 1 1
Jimenez 8 1-2 G0 0.0. 2 0 3
Lewis 15 2-2 2-3 0-3 2 2 6
Hornsby 12 2-6 0-0 1-2 0 1 5
Richardson 11 1-1 0-2 0-5 0 2 2
Ode 18 3-6 0-0 1-5 0 2 6
Geyer 9 02 00 1-2 1 1 0
Totals 200 30-66 19-2710-4820 18 85
FG%2 .455 FT%:.704 3-point FG: 6-12, 500 (Newton
1-1, Fife 1-1, Guyton 2-6, Jimenez 1-2, H-ornsby 1-2).
Blocks: S (Newton 4, H-aston). Steals: 9 (Fife 2, Geyer,
Guyton, Odle). Turnovers: 10 (Newton 3, Lewis 2,
Washington 2, Fife, Guyton, Odle).
Technical Fouls: none.

Conference Overal

HOOSIERS
Continued from Page 9
Ellerbe said it would be easy to
trumpet the Indiana defense because
of the lopsided score.
"But we haven't even faced
Michigan State and Ohio State,"
Ellerbe said.
As for the Hoosiers, who held
Michigan to a season-low fifty
points? He conceded, after a pause,
that their defenses play was "pretty
good."
STATESE: While Groninger, an

Indiana native wearing maize and
blue, had a tough debut in
Bloomington, his mirror image on
the Hoosier bench seems to be living
it up.
Dane Fife, a Michigan native
wearing red and white, was notice-
ably eager as he took his spot in Bob
Knight's starting lineup. Fife's broth-
er, Dugan, played four seasons for
the Wolverines and now offers com-
mentary on Michigan's flagship sta-
tion, WJR.
SHAKE A LEG: In another eccen-
tric move that left reporters scratch-

ing their heads, Knight walked up
and down the rows of media at the
post-game press conference, shaking
each person's hand.
When one reporter asked if
Knight would wash his hands imme-
diately following the press confer-
ence, the unusually good-natured
coach replied in the negative.
"I think you people are the finest,
cleanest people in the world," he
said.
Knight did not ask reporters if
they would wash their hands after the
conference.

Team
Ohio State
Michigan State
Purdue
Indiana
Michigan
Penn State
Illinois
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Iowa
Northwestem

W
4
4
4
5
3
3.
2
2
2
2
0

.
1
1
1
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5

W
13
13
13
15
12
11
10
10
10
8
4

L
3
5
5
3
5
6
6
6
8
9
13

9

Michigan........18
Indiana....................45

32 -50
40 - 85

Yesterday's result:
INDIANA 85, Michigan 50

I

I ______________________________________________________________________________

DIVING INTO

HISTORY

0

By David Horn
Daily Sports Writer
ere are names that resonate
through Canham Natatorium.
Names like Mann, Stager, Hanley,
Urbanchek and Dolan. Equally mythical
among these names is that of diving
coach Richard Kimball. Now in his 44th
consecutive year involved with men's
diving at Michigan. Kimball has estab-
lished himself as a leading name in the
sport. His tenure is the longest among all
Division I coaches.
"Coach Kimball is the Bear Bryant
of collegiate diving," Michigan women's
swimming coach Jim Richardson said.
"He is amazing."
Kimball was born in Rochester,
Minn., in 1935. His older brother attend-
ed a private Catholic school where he
played football, baseball and boxed. But
the younger Kimball would not follow in
his brother's footsteps. Richard Kimball

showed promise in swimming and div-
ing as a young boy, and the decision was
made for him to attend the public school,
where a diving program was available.
As a middle schooler he competed
on the varsity level, and was ranked No.
7 in the state in his first year. In eighth
grade Kimball was ranked No. 4. In each
of his four high school years, the diving
phenom was ranked No. I in the state,
and led his team to four straight state
championships.
Kimball was recruited to dive at
Michigan, following a year spent at
Oklahoma. Coach Bruce Harlan - a
1948 Olympic gold medalist - and his
sophomore sensation would comple-
ment a strong Michigan squad that annu-
ally fought against Big Ten rival Ohio
State. In 1957, Kimball became the first
Wolverine in 20 years to be national col-
legiate diving champion on both the one-
meter and three-meter springboard.

. "Our coach was an OSU diver, so it
spurred a rivalry," Kimball said. "We
stole a lot of recruits from Ohio."
In 1959, the Wolverines were battling
Ohio State for the Big Ten title. Ohio
State divers Ron O'Brien and Sam Hall
challenged Kimball for conference
supremacy on the three meter board.
Entering the final dual meet of the sea-
son against Ohio State, Michigan had
won 26-straight dual meets. Despite a
disappointing performance from
Kimball, the Wolverines triumphed.
"For quality plus quantity, this is the
best team you've ever had," legendary
Ohio State coach Mike Peppe told mem-
bers of the Michigan team after the meet.
"Your second team could take the nation-
als. You had guys swimming we never
heard about who beat our best men by 20
yards."
But Kimball had yet to defeat his
Ohio State counterparts. At the national
meet, he would have his chance.
"Without a doubt he'll win the
NCAA championships," Harlan told the
Daily before the final meet of Kimball's
collegiate career.
Harlan's Namathesque prophecy was
realized. He suggested that the dives
Kimball attempted against Ohio State
were difficult dives at which he "lacked
expertise." But the NCAA championship
was another matter. Kimball's perfor-
mance was good enough for him to win
the individual title, helping the
Wolverines edge out a pesky Yale squad.
The success of a Kimball-led diving
squad made a tremendous impact on the
success of the entire swimming team -
more so than modem squads.
"There were instances when (the
divers) would score a third of the team's
total points," Kimball said.
The sentiment of Peppe regarding the
dominance of the Wolverines is echoed
today by their leading diver.
"My senior year we could have divid-
ed the team into three separate parts and
won first, second, and third at nationals
- that's how good we were," Kimball
said.
In the year after Kimball's gradua-
tion, tragedy struck the team. Harlan
died when he fell from a scaffold during
an exhibitional diving show. Kimball

would have to make the transition imme-
diately from diver to coach.
"I was in the right place at the right
time," Kimball said.
Thus, a new era began in Michigan
swimming and diving.
In 1960, Michigan's most prolific
diver in its history became its coach.
Over 41 years, Kimball earned every
honor that could be bestowed on a diving
coach, and has maintained and furthered
Michigan's reputation as a national
swimming and diving power. He has
served as U.S. Olympic team coach five
times, and has attended two additional
Olympic games with his own divers.
The sport of diving has changed rad-
ically in the 45 years that Kimball has
been in Ann Arbor. Although the degree
of difficulty of most dives is much
greater, Kimball suggests that it is not a
result of better athletes.
"Years ago you had to wait four years
for the approval of new dives," Kimball
said. "Now the sport continues to evolve
as dives continue to be added. The back-
wards handstand that is getting to be so
popular now I was doing back in the
60's. But it wasn't legal back then. It's the
changes in the sport and the new chal-
lenges that keep me coming back."
Recruiting is among the challenges
Kimball finds rewarding, but tiresome.
"Success breeds success," Kimball
said. "If you have a good program, peo-
ple become interested in it. Other coach-
es are using the fact that I've been here
41 years against me. They say, 'don't go
to Michigan. How long is (Kimball)
going to stay there?' Obviously after
being here this long the end is in sight,
but it's not the kind of thing you want to
be thinking about."

But for all the trouble that his skep-
tics create, Kimball continues to be a
leader and pioneer in his sport. He is
credited with popularizing the use of the
one meter dive in competition.
"Richard Kimball was the reason I
went to Michigan." said former Kimball
diver and current University of Florida
diving coach Donnie Craine. "ie is like
a second father to me. He was the best
man at my wedding. Kimball is still a
leader in the sport - when he talks, oth-
ers listen. He works harder than anyone
else, and always commands respect."
Kimball's accomplishments are
many. A four-time Big Ten Coach of the
Year; a two-time NCAA Diving Coach
of the Year; coach of four Olympic gold
medalists; a member of the International
Swimming Hall of Fame. But for all his
successes, his life hasn't been free of

drama. In 1988, his son Bruce was
involved in a car accident in which two
teenagers were killed and another six
injured. He served five years in prison
for vehicular manslaughter.
The walls of Richard Kimball's office
are decorated by photographs of him with
everyone from Jimmy Carter to Tom
Dolan, everywhere from Seoul to
Mexico City. He has been the most rec-
ognizable name in men's and women's
diving over the past half century. Kimball
was thrust into coaching at Michigan in
1960 and has not looked back. In
February of 1981 the Daily ran a feature
on the man that attempted to summarize
his accomplishments of 21 years. 20
years later, Kimball is 20 years more
accomplished, and despite his fellow
coaches' wishes the end of a very special
coaching tenure may or may not be near.

Richard Kimball

0

F '3

«I learned that chan1ge
is not easy~ but it i
possible."

DAILY ARCHIVES
In 1957, Richard Kimball became the first Michigan diver to win Nationals on both
both the one meter and three meter springboard.

'M' hockey may
host preseason
tourney i 2000
If all goes as planned, the
Michigan hockey team will play host
to one of college hockey's preseason
challenges next fall, the Ice Breaker
Tournament.
On his local radio program yester-
day, Michigan hockey coach Red
Berenson said he is "95 percent
sure that Yost Ice Arena will be
home to the 2000 Ice Breaker
Tournament.
The tournament is planned to take
place over the weekend of October
6-7.
Berenson wanted to bring together
the best teams from the best confer-
ences nationwide.
Next season's lineup hopefully
will include perennial powerhouses
Michigan, Colgate, New Hampshire
and North Dakota.
This year, Denver played host and
won the tournament.
The other teams that participated
in the Ice Breaker included Union,
Providence and CCHA member
Notre Dame.
- Sarah Ensor

WEDNEDA LUNCH SEIAL

When Sanjay Garla left college, he doubted whether his classroom lessons
related to the real world. But joining AmeriCorps helped him make the connection he had
been lacking. By the end of the year, he had launched a public education drive to help community
residents get the health care they needed. "AmeriCorps challenged me and helped me
grow," Sanjay says. "After that year, I returned to school with new skills and a better
sense of direction."
AmeriCorps Information Session * Wednesday, January 26, 2000
4:30pm * Career Planning and Placement " 3200 Student Activities Building
For more information, contact Courtney Nicholas at (312) 353-0574 or
E-mail cnicholas@cns.gov

1/3 lb. Cheeseburger
& Fries only $3.49
11:30-3:00pm
One third of a pound of
lean ground chuck served
on a kaiser roll with
lettuce, tomato, and
American cheese.
HUMP DAY HAPPY
HOUR BUFFET
Complimentary hors,
d'oeuvres 4-6pm
Happy Hour 3-6 pm
Mon.-Fri.
$1.00 off Pints of
Beer and Mixed
Drinks

LECTURE NOTE BLOWOUTI!
10 DAYS ONLY

338 S. State Street
996-9191
http://www.Ashleys.com

I%-

N r

i' ,

Bio 124
Bio Anthro 161
Bio Anthro 364
Comm Studies 101
Econ 101
Econ 102
Econ 402
Geo Sci100
Geo Sci 104
Geo Sci105
Geo Sci 107
Geo Sci110

Geo Sci114
Geo Sci115
Hist 160
Hist 218
Hist 389
Linguistics 210
Philosophy 232
Philosophy 356
Physics 125
Physics 140
Physics 240
Physics 242

Psych 111
Psych 330
Psych 340
Psych 350
Psych 360
Psych 370
Psych 380
Psych 390
Psych 400
Psych 436
Wom Studies 220
Wom Studies 240

LATE NIGHT FOOD S

l Al

O *m
Iu TOR

.I.oooff tciU..-- -=1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan