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January 14, 2000 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-01-14

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LOCAL/STATE
State House committee passes
2 anti-pornography proposals

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 14, 2000 - 7

Learning his fate

By Jeremy W. Peters
Da taff Reporter
Pula entertainment providers in the state of
Michigan may soon find themselves bound by rather
strict regulations as a result of two anti-pornography
bills that were sent to the state House of
Representatives on Wednesday.
If passed, the two bills will allow for the periodic
inspection of strip clubs, adult bookstores and adult
theaters for unsanitary conditions and will provide
reimbursement of legal fees to citizens who sue such
establishments.
"It's a health safety and welfare issue," said Rep.
M' Bishop (R-Rochester), who chairs the House
Co itutional Law and Ethics Committee, which
passed the bills to the House.
"The concern is for the areas surrounding these
businesses. They often suffer increased crime rates
... and decreasing property values;' Bishop added.
The bills that passed out of committee
Wednesday are part of a larger anti-pornography
package of 13 bills, many of which impose harsh-
er restrictions than the ones already before the

House.
House Speaker Chuck Perricone (R-Kalamazoo
Twp.), a long-time proponent of regulating the adult
entertainment industry, is one of many Republicans
supporting legislation that would force strip clubs to
close at 10 p.m., require entertainers to have licensees
and force those who wish to open adult business to
disclose the nature of their establishment.
Lenny Komendera, general manager at Deja Vu
Showgirls in Ypsilanti, said he is not only con-
cerned about effects the laws could have on busi-
ness, but also the potential danger they pose to
dancers.
Under one of the bills, dancers would have to obtain
a license before they work. This could make informa-
tion such as dancers' names and addresses available to
the public.
"I am concerned about the safety of the girls. This
opens the door for stalkers" Komendera said.
Lorri Rishar, spokesperson for Perricone, under-
scored the speaker's commitment to the passage of the
anti-pornography legislation.
"As speaker, it was an initiative he was (involved)

from the ground up. He feels very confident that this
package will withhold any constitutional challenges,'
Rishar said.
Rep. Liz Brater (D-Ann Arbor) expressed her con-
cern with a bill that would mandate that pornographic
material be placed behind counters in stores so juve-
niles could not have access to them.
"It is really hard to draw a bright line between
what is and what is not subject to regulation. There
are art books, sex education books," Brater said. "I
am concerned from a First Amendment point of
view."
Though the full House will not vote on any of
the bills until they have all moved through com-
mittee, the remaining 11 are either currently in
committee or will be making their way there in a
few weeks.
Despite the controversy surrounding his business,
Komendera still maintains his establishment is not a
threat to the community.
"We are an alternative source of entertain-
ment," he said. "We are not seen as a house of ill
repute."

.AP PHOTO
Thirteen-year-old Nathaniel Abraham leans back in his chair asrhe hears his
fate in court yesterday. The youngest murder defendant ever tried as an
adult, Abraham was sentenced to be held in a juvenile facility until age 21.

ClASS ES
Continued from Page 1.
that happen when the number of stu-
dents exceeds a class' capacity.
"All ve do is add seating. Normally
we add capacity any time we can," he
said.
John Whittier-Ferguson, director
of undergraduate studies for the
University's English Department,
saiehe department has about 1,000
concentrators, but between 6,000 and
7,000 undergraduates take English
courses throughout the academic
year.
He said the department has decreased
the number of graduate student instruc-
tors within the last three years.
"A couple of years ago, the English
department decided to decrease the size
of graduate program due to a tight
na al job market for new Ph.D.s. The
fact that we made this decision - one
that we are very committed to - has
meant that we have fewer GSIs to lead

discussion sections' Whittier-Ferguson
said, adding that the department contin-
ues to hire as many tenure track profes-
sors as possible.
Whittier-Ferguson said at the begin-
ning of every term he encourages facul-
ty members to prioritize the waitlist to
graduating seniors who need specific
classes to fulfill concentration require-
ments. But he said he "cannot require
faculty to follow a particular policy
with their class lists."
Other academic units have increased
enrollment in popular classes, but
despite their efforts, class congestion
continues.
"It became clear last summer that we
didn't have enough slots for the incom-
ing students, so we opened up another
lecture section last fall," said James
Hilton, chair of the undergraduate psy-
chology program, referring to the
1,200-student Psychology Ill class.
"We upped the enrollment by almost
400 slots in the fall."
He said the department initially

thought there would be enough slots
for the current term because 500 slots
were still available for the course two
days before registration ended.
Hilton said the course closed about
16 hours later.
By that time, Hilton said, the depart-
ment could not add another section.
"We were not able to find enough
qualified instructors for the semester,
while keeping up the level of quality,"
he said.
The economics department added
four sections to Economics 101 during
registration to accommodate students
who wanted to take the microeconom-
ics course,
This course is a required course
for a cross-section of University stu-
dents, including those in the College
of Engineering, the School of
Natural Resources and the
Environment and students who wish
to transfer into the School of
Business Administration.
"Less people took the class in the

fall than we were used to, so more
than the normal number of students
took classes in the winter," said eco-
nomics Prof. Jan Gerson, who teach-
es one of the Economics 101 courses
this semester.
Gerson said she feels optimistic
about increasing the number of sec-
tions.
"l believe everyone who wants to
take the class will - if students are
willing to get up at nine in the morn-
ing," she said.
Gerson said overrides for this course
proceed in the order of the waitlist.
"The only fair way (to issue over-
rides) for this class is in the order of
students who tried to get spots," she
said.
Acknowledging students' hassles
with registration, Gerson said the
University has a hard time anticipating
enrollment figures.
"You can never exactly tell ahead of
time how many people will register for
a class,"she said.

MARTI N
Continued from Page 1.
when asked, and will continue to do
so," Bollinger said. "We are fully com-
mitted to finding out the truth about
what may have happened and to uphold
to the highest standards and values in
our athletics program."
Should Martin be bound to testify, the
action will force the University to decide
whether such a development warrants a
re-opening of the investigation.
The FBI raided Martin's residence
last spring while investigating him for
alleged involvement in a numbers oper-
ation and uncovered evidence linking
him to at least five former Michigan
basketball players.
As Bollinger acknowledged last
May, evidence suggested that several
former players had taken cash pay-
ments from Martin while playing at
Michigan.
Because the Internal Revenue
Service has become involved in the
matter, federal authorities may be inter-
ested in unreported income by former
players via Martin.
After the raid, former players Louis

Bullock, Robert Traylor, Maurice Taylor,
Jalen Rose and Chris Webber were
issued subpoenas to appear in front of a
federal grand jury. That testimony has
not been released to the public.
Since the onset of the federal investi-,
gation, the University has been in con-
tact with the U.S. Attorney's office.
"We have been careful not to conduct
any inquiry that might interfere with
the federal investigation," Bollinger
said in the statement. "We will continue
to follow that practice."
Education Prof. Percy Bates, who
assisted in the original investigation,
said Martin was not compelled to dis-
close fully his involvement in 1997, and
the report would have been more thor-
ough if all those involved were forced
to cooperate fully.
But Bates said nothing now suggests
that the investigation should be re-
opened, and even a statement by Martin
may or may not prompt such action.
"As far as we know, anything that
went on has not been revealed - we
really have no new information,"
Bates said. "Right now all we know
is that something is being negotiat-
ed."

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MESSENGERS (2)-deliver campus mail on
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PAID LISTENERS NEEDED for semester
long study, at Kresge Hearing Institute.
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PHYSICAL ASSISTANT NEEDED for
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RESEARCH DATA COLLECTION AND
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The University of Michigan, Survey
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is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action
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RESPONSIBLE PERSON to drive two
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SECURITY GUARDS to work on UM

STUDENT RESEARCH assistants needed
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Eng. or other arts/hum majors to tape record
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equipment provided total of 10 to 20 hours
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SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS needed at all
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day to start. 15 minutes north of Ann
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SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
We are currently hiring motivated freshman,
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Compensation: salary of $400.00 per week
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Application Deadline is January 29, 2000.
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TEACHER! PART-TIME for before &
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WANT TO DO LUNCH????- The Ann
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WANTED: 29 PEOPLE to get paid $$ to
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WEB DEVELOPMENT. Seeking talented
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WEB SITE DESIGNERS &
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MIS, a web development company located in
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MIS offers flex. working hrs. and
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WEB SUPERHERO or graphic designer
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