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April 15, 1999 - Image 14

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-04-15

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14A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, April 15, 1999

Softball rebounds
with win in nightcap

MARK
SNYDER
Mark My Words

SOFTBALL
Continued from Page 10A
allowed Eiland and Gillies to rest.
Power pitchers, like Barda, are
known to have trouble pitching on
consecutive days.
"It didn't bother me that much,"
Barda said. "It's no big deal to me."
In the second inning, Michigan
jumped on the board first to take a 1-
0 lead.
Third baseman Pam Kosanke sin-
gled to lead off the inning and
advanced to third on a throwing
error. Tammy Mika drove her in on a
double.
Central Michigan responded with
two runs in the top of the fourth.
In the bottom of that inning, right-
fielder Melissa Taylor was called
safe at second on a stolen base
attempt - only to have the home-
plate umpire overrule the decision.
A visibly angry Hutchins
exchanged words with the homeplate
umpire.
But instead of continuing her
arguing - and risking a possible
early exit to the showers - Hutchins
used that call to rally her team.
"We didn't have a lot of emotion
until I got angry about the call on

Taylor," Hutchins said. "We were
just standing around watching the
game so I told them to get fired up
and they did."
Michigan iced the game with three
runs in the bottom of the fifth, and
another two runs in the sixth.
With the streak behind them,
Michigan is looking toward this
weekend where they can add on to
their current win streak - one game.
Northwestern is playing the role of
the duck next, but any Michigan
opponent should be careful.
It's hunting season.
Davie's Dingers
With her homer in the third
inning of the first game of
yesterday's doubleheader,
Michigan's Catherine Davie
climbed the list of the
Wolverines' all-time homerun
leaders.

CHRIS CAMPERNEL/Daily
The Michigan softball team split its doubleheader yesterday against Central
Michigan. The loss broke the Wolverines' 33-game unbeaten streak.

CENTRAL MICHIGAN (7)
ADR N RBI 1350OPO A
Manson,c 3 1 2 0 1 0 7 0
Burke, 3b 3 1 0 0 0 2 2 3
Robertshawss4 1 1 3 0 0 1 5
Barnes, cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 0 0
Weston,rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Morrison, rf 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
Kinney, p 4 1 2 0 0 0 0 1
Horton, pr 0 1 0 0 0.0 0 0
Skuta, 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 2 1
4 Bouck, If 3 0 2 2 1 0 2 0
Stephens,lb 3 0 1 0 0 0 7 0
Simmons, p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 7 13 73 3 21 10
E: 3 (Burke, Weston, Skuta). DP: none LOB: 8 26:
4 (Robertshaw, Barnes, Kinney, Skuta) 36: none
MR: none CS: none SH: 2 (Burke, Stephens) SF:
none SB: 3 (Weston, Bouck, Simmons)
MICHIGAN (4)
AS R H RBI BB 50 PO A
Conrad 1b 3 0 0 1 1 0 5 0
Koen, 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 5 0
Davie,If 4 1 1 1 0 1 0 1
Volpe, dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 4 0
Kosanke,3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 7
Mika, cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 0 0
Tuness 3 1 2 1 1 1 3 2
Conner, pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lappo dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Garza, ph 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Taylor, 'f 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
iland, p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gillies, p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 47 44 721 10
E: 2 (Conrad, Gilles) OP: 2 LOS 10 28: Tune 39:
hone HR: Davie CS: none SH: Taylor SF: none SB:
none
Central Michigan.....000 041 2-7
Michigan ..............001 200 1-4
Central Mi. IP H R ER BB SO AB BF
Kinney 7.0 7 4 2 4 7 30 35
Michigan IP H R ER SB SO ASF
Eiand 4.2 7 4 4 2 2 18 21
Gillies 2.1 6 3 2 1 1 13 15
At: Alumni Field
Attendance: 241

Pla er
Melissa Gentile
Catherine Davie
Sara Griffin
Alicia Seergert
Jessica Lang
Kelly Kovach

WRs
19
1.7
14
11
7.
6

CENTRAL MICHIGAN (3)
AB R NH RBI 3350OPO A
Manson, ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Burke 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 1 1
Robertshaw,1b4 0 0 0 0 0 11 0
Barnes, cf 3 1 3 0 0 0 1 0
Weston, rf 3 1 2 0 0 0 1 0
Morrison, rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kinney dh 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Simmonspr0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Skuta, 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3
Horvath, c 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Nolan,ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Foster, p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Horton, p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 28 3 8 2 2 0 18 10
E: 2 (Burke, Weston). DP: none LOB: 6 28:
(Kinney) 38: Bouck HR: none CS: none SH: none
SF: none SB: 2 (Barnes, Weston)
MICHIGAN (6)
Al R H RBI80 SOPO A
Conrad,lb 4 0 1 0 0 17 0
Kollen, 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 1 5
Davie, f 4 2 3 0 0 0 0 0
Volpe, dh 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0
Conner,pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kosanke,3b 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 3
Mika, cf 3 0 2 2 1 0 0 0
Tune, ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 3
Garza, dh 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0
Taylor, rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Barda, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Totals 29 6126 5 121 15
E: none DP: none LOB: 10 28: 3 (Conrad, Volpe,
Mika) 38: none NR: none CS: Taylor SH: none SF:
none SB: Davie
Central Michigan. 000 2 00 1 -3
Michigan .............010 032 x-6

U hen did the Daily take hold?
To accurately assess the end
of a journey, the beginning
must be considered. Where did it start,
how long did it take and what pitfalls
emerged along the way.
With these words, the conclusion
draws ever closer. The last nightside
came two months ago, the last article
barely fit into this calendar year and
finally, it's time to say goodbye.
Maybe it was the midsummer night
when a window that opened a foot
became just open enough.
I remember the first day as vividly as
the last. With a friend in September
1995, the Daily opened its doors to a
green reporter who yearned for some-
thing new. After three hours of poring
through old copies of the Daily, the
only certainty emerged from my tired
hands - no news was good news.
Combining disdain for classwork
with a penchant for laziness was hardly
the path for an aggressive news
reporter so I decided to leave the Daily
- a career finished in one night.
On the way out of the building, the
sports banter ensued and I was hooked.
Could it be the summer when deliv-
ering papers became a reason to wake
up, Art Fair became an obstacle to
overcome and excitement seized us
daily?
Those who consider college a place
to find oneself tapped my shoulder that
fall evening and four years later, I'm
streaking along, on to the next phase of
an increasingly public life.
But I cannot assume the credit for
being drawn to the profession. The
Daily itself paved my path.
You've read in these pages recently
that there are people who love to follow
the journalism path, eager to explore
the world through the stories of heroes
while at the same time creating heroes
from the stories. I'm the type they
spoke about.
I love the life, have savored the expe-
riences, soaked in the highs and lows
with exuberance.
A possibility was when 12 college
students used planes, trains and auto-
mobiles "just to be there" as fans, as
freelancers, but mostly as friends.
The memories will remain vivid long
after meaningless classes wash away.
Who gasped 10 feet from Diallo
Johnson as his post route won the 1999
Citrus Bowl?
Who else stood with Red Berenson
in his lockerroom 30 minutes after his

second national title, watching him
beam with victory?
Where were the masses when Robert
Traylor - along with an assortment of
relatives - used his high school press
conference to leave Michigan hoops in
shambles?
Those are the moments the Daily
brought me.
But the Daily was about more tl&
giving me a chance to bask in the sad-
ows of other people's glory - it was
about the daily rush, the witty banter
and the lifelong friends.
It could be the fall when the three
wise men made roots in Big Ten bars,
enjoying the arguing well beyond last
call. Or the Buckeye morning, when
two passes became three for the tough-
est ticket in the country.
While I'll continue telling sports
ies for years to come, tomorrow it
becomes a job. Attending games
becomes a note-taking class, digging
for a scoop transforms into competition
and hard work goes from high-fives to
a boss' cold shoulder.
They say the money's bad, the hours
stink and the travel is brutal on a social
life. The change will bother me because
the Daily was never a chore. It was
always a place I wanted to stay fore
an interaction of creativity and passi ,
where I could give more than I had and
love every minute.
It's hard to pinpoint the moment
from four years that fueled my passion,
but saying goodbye - as you can tell
- is agonizingly difficult.
Though there's often a mocking tone
directed at the Daily, because few out-
siders understand. It's like any campus
group - a fraternity/sorority, an ath@
ic team, a multicultural club or MSA.
- that becomes an interlocking unit.
The only difference is we're sharing
everyone's stories.
Please don't try to imagine the hours
expended because, regardless of what.
Dailyites tell you, they don't count.
Maybe it was a head-bobbing friend
who taught me to live life and enjoy
work because the next day is uncertain.
We come as a blank slate, seeking
place, watching the clock and wantin
to leave.
We depart richer for the experience
and better for the memories but, in the
end, only time turns us away.
- This is Mark Snydersfinal column
for The Michigan Daily. He can be
reached via e-mail at
msnyder@umich.edu.

Central Mi.
Foster
Horton

IP H R ER BB
5.2 12 6 5 4
0.1 0 0 0 1

SO
2
0

A$
28
1

OF
32

Michigan IP H R ER BB SO AB BF
Barda 7.0 8 3 3 2 0 28 30
At: Alumni Field
Attendance: 241

CHRIS CAMPERNEL/Oaily
Traci Conrad, Michigan's leading hitter, went one-for-seven in yesterday's double-
header with Central Michigan.

U II

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