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March 16, 1999 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-03-16

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8UXLER 75,
Oldbominion 62
XAVI ER 87,
Wake Forest 76
Princeton 61,
N.C. STATE 58
TCU 101,
Nebraska 89

NBA
BASKETBALL
TORONTO 89,
Charlotte 82
ORLANDO 74,
Philadelphia 73

New York at
MILWAUKEE Inc.
Utah at
MINNESOTA, Inc.
Cleveland at
CHICAGO, Inc.
Vancouver at
DENVER, inc.

SPORLTSt~n ul

The Michigan women's golf team opened play at the
Spring Lake Invitational in Sebring, Fla. yesterday. The
young Wolverines will use this tournament to gain
experience and momentum for the spring season.

Tuesday
March 16, 1999

9

Vargas to miss
entire season
By Rick Freeman
Daily Sports Editor
The Michigan football team suffered its first official
*tback of the 1999 season last week, when it lost speedy
sophomore halfback Justin Fargas for all of the 1999 sea-
son.
March 9, Fargas spent four hours in surgery to have a
new'plate inserted in his broken right leg.
Tie leg which was originally injured in Michigan's 27-
10 victory over Wisconsin Nov. 14, had been healing
normally until regular wear-and-tear proved too much
for one of the plates, Fargas said from his home in
Encino, Calif.
Fargas said he has been at home since he returned
Sere for spring break. At that time, it was discovered
that his leg would not heal properly unless the plate was
fixed.
"It's a little discouraging, because I had been making
progress," Fargas said. "It's nothing that's going to stop
me from achieving my goals."
He said his family and friends have kept his mind off
the pain, as have calls from teammates Larry Foote and
Dave Terrell.
"It's something that in the long run is going to make
me stronger," said Fargas, a former California state
ampion in the 100-meters.
Last season, Fargas was the Wolverines' third-leading
rusher, gaining 294 yards and scoring one touchdown.
The 6-1, 185-pound speedster also gained 311 yards on
16 kick returns.

Blue left out of all-
CCHA honors

By Chris Duprey
Daily Sports Editor
The CCHA All-Conference Team,
which was released yesterday, is
composed of players from almost all
of the league's best teams -
Michigan State, Ohio State and
Notre Dame, among others.
But representatives from one team
were notably absent from the award
roster - Michigan.
Not one Wolverine made the first
or second team, and only defense-
man Mike Van Ryn was selected for
honorable mention, the third tier of
awards. ,
Van Ryn, a sophomore, re-estab-
lished himself as one of the better
two-way players in the conference,
notching 10 goals and 10 assists
while helping to anchor Michigan's
blue line.
Despite the naming of Van Ryn to
the honorable mention list, Michigan
coach Red Berenson was surprised
by the lack of his teammates selected
to join him.
"I like to see our players get recog-
nition when they deserve it,"
Berenson said. "Bubba Berenzweig

has to be one of the premier defense-
men in the league, and to see him not
be recognized is really disappoint-
ing.
Berenzweig missed honorable
mention by just one point in the
coaches' poll, earning 14 points, one
behind Michigan State's Bryan
Adams and Notre Dame's Brian
Urick.
The senior captain's seven goals
and 22 assists this season were a sec-
ondary accomplishment to the
patient way he has handled a young
Michigan team, but in a postseason
award that is based largely on statis-
tics, Berenzweig's intangibles fell by
the wayside.
Josh Langfeld was also looked
over, as other, more prolific forwards
outshadowed the sophomore.
Langfeld, Michigan's leading goal-
scorer, has 21 goals and 13 assists to
date.
Freshman Mike Comrie got on the
voting scoreboard, but wasn't a seri-
ous contender for honorable mention
with just six votes.
See CCHA, Page 10

WARREN LINN/Daily
Justin Fargas' leg injury on Nov. 14, pictured here, will keep him out of action this upcoming season,
as Fargas had surgery on it over spring break.

Michigan's youth developed into
integral part of winning season

By Uma Subramanian
Daily Sports Writer
In early October no one knew what
to expect from the 1998-99 Michigan
women's basketball team.
Six months later, reflecting on a sea-
son that ended Sunday in a heartbreak-
ing loss to
Jchigan State, BASKETBALL
once nag-
ging questions Commentary
about the youth ------------
and inexperience of the team have been
answered.
Throughout the course of a tumul-
tuous season that featured record-
breaking performances as well as
lengthy losing streaks, one constant
emerged - the team grew. It grew
*h every victory and with every
heartbreaking loss.
"We did a pretty good job this year,
Michigan captain Stacey Thomas said.
"It was a learning process for every-
body and we had high expectations."
At the start of the season, the
Wolverines were young. Four fresh-
men would be forced to play pivotal
roles in order for the team to experi-
ence any success at all. And the critics
were out in force.
Sichigan lost four players to gradu-
a on in 1998, and with the loss of
Pollyanna Johns, Michigan's inside
game was gone.
As a result, no one expected the
Wolverines to go very far or do very
much.
Even Michigan assistant coach
Eileen Shea had a few reservations.
"I think because of our youth, I was-
t't sure what to expect" Shea said.
oking back it was a year we spent
building for the future."
The returning players, however,
would not be taken lightly.
"We had high expectations heading
into the season," Thomas said. "We
expected to make it to the NCAA tour-
nament and win the Big Ten tourna-
ment. We knew losing Pollyanna that it
would be tough.
"Though we didn't meet most of our

goals, overall we did a pretty good
job."
Along the way, the Wolverines
played some exciting basketball nearly
knocking off No. 2 Purdue and always
competing though they had a challeng-
ing schedule.
The season started off slowly with
an opening game loss to perennial
powerhouse Vanderbilt followed by a
string of nine victories over powder-
puffs like Bowling Green and Central
Michigan.
Once 1999 arrived, things began to
pick up. The new year brought a tough
Big Ten schedule, a game versus No. 4
Louisiana Tech., and national expo-
sure.
As January and February sped by the
intensity of the conference season
heated up and Michigan was right in
the thick of a very close race.
As captain, Thomas developed into
the team leader both on and off the
court and in the process scored her
1,000th point and broke her own career
steals record.
All the while the growing process
continued. And, it wasn't just the
Wolverines who noticed the develop-
ment of their team.
"It's pretty fun," sophomore guard
Anne Thorius said. "I was talking to
my friend (Michigan State forward)
Pernille Dalgaard who said that the
first time (the Spartans) played us their
coaches told them to only worry about

our perimeter game with me, Stacey
and Ann (Lemire).
"But before the last two games
against us, their coaches have been
telling them to not leave Raina
(Goodlow) and Ruth (Kipping) open
on the inside. That shows how much
we've grown as a team."
Michigan coach Sue Guevara always
remarks that her freshmen aren't fresh-
men anymore. And now, it's true.
The next time they take the hard-
wood as a team, they definitely won't
be.
The four freshmen will have trans-
formed into leaders in their own right.
But though they've grown on the
court and now have the experience of
another year of college basketball, per-
haps the most important story about
these Wolverines is that they've grown
together.
Instead of merely being 10 players
who meet daily at the gym, they have
all become friends.
"We do a lot of fun stuff together,"
Thorius said. "With six of the players
living in South Quad, we all hang out.
"People really get along on this
team. That's what makes it fun, and I
think that's why we improved this
year."
Though memories of Sunday's gut-
wrenching loss may remain for a
while, eventually only memories of the
successes and the camaraderie will
linger.

Council on International
Educational Exchange
1218 South University Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Phone: 734-998-0200

DANA INNANE/Daily
The Wolverines endured both winning and losing streaks this season, and came
out on top making it to their second-straight postseason appearance.

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